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  • October this year.

  • Around the world, devoted fans

  • mourned the death of Steve Jobs,

  • the force of nature behind Apple.

  • He distorted reality. It's a mixture of charisma, chutzpah,

  • bullshit, self-belief, self-delusion,

  • and insane ambition.

  • Apple's hi-tech products have inspired fervour.

  • Oh, it's beautiful. It's very sexy.

  • Defining cool consumerism for a worldwide tribe.

  • Hyped by the man who personified the brand.

  • It works like magic.

  • They look so good, you want to lick 'em.

  • It's unbelievable.

  • No-one had quite that mixture of arrogance,

  • humility, talent and presence, which Steve Jobs had.

  • He's changed music, he's changed movies, he's changed computers a couple of times.

  • He's created industries that we didn't think we needed.

  • Jobs was a perfectionist.

  • To Steve, everything was about taste. Just like someone writing a great piece of music.

  • And a tyrant.

  • Steve Jobs yelling at you with his full force is kind of

  • a pretty frightening thing for most people.

  • How did a drug-taking college dropout

  • create one of the most successful corporations in the world?

  • His hippy background made him a better billionaire.

  • This is the inside story

  • of how Steve Jobs took Apple

  • from a suburban garage to global supremacy.

  • This is the launch of the Macintosh computer in 1984.

  • An early glimpse of the way Apple has marketed itself

  • to the world ever since.

  • MUSIC: "Chariots Of Fire" by Vangelis

  • The Macintosh was the first computer

  • with a mouse that was meant for all of us.

  • It has turned out insanely great.

  • APPLAUSE

  • We were all very idealistic and passionate.

  • This was our personal cause.

  • In this auditorium, three crucial factors

  • came together for the first time.

  • A new computer designed to be easier to use

  • than any that had come before.

  • Sold with an audacious message of revolution.

  • And hyped by Steve Jobs himself.

  • I'd like to open the meeting with a an old poem by Dylan. That's Bob Dylan.

  • LAUGHTER

  • Come writers and critics who prophesise with your pens

  • And keep your eyes wide...

  • What started here in 1984, with the launch of the Mac

  • became the template that certainly got improved upon as Apple became

  • one of the great marketing companies that the world has ever seen.

  • ..for the loser now will be later to win

  • for the times they are a-changin'.

  • APPLAUSE

  • The whole auditorium of about 2,500 people

  • gave it a standing ovation.

  • It was a very, very emotional moment because it was no longer ours.

  • From that day forward, it was no loner ours, we couldn't change it.

  • Jobs cast Apple as the plucky underdog,

  • taking on a domineering rival.

  • IBM wants it all

  • and is aiming its guns on its last obstacle to industry control - Apple.

  • Will big blue dominate the entire computer industry?

  • The entire information age?

  • Was George Orwell right about 1984?

  • APPLAUSE

  • 'We celebrate the first glorious anniversary...'

  • Apple created an advert that painted IBM as Big Brother.

  • the enemy of freedom.

  • These images have helped define Apple as a brand ever since.

  • 'We shall prevail.'

  • That was the birth of the Apple brand.

  • It was talked about

  • and it was literally focusing on a revolution.

  • And that revolutionary theme was absolutely at the core

  • of what made Apple successful over the next years.

  • The 1984 ad was the first time

  • when you started to get a real sense of the Apple club.

  • People who defined themselves by their association with the brand.

  • That they weren't IBM clones, they were these creative thinkers

  • who had a different attitude, in some way.

  • I think that's been the kind of common currency

  • that's been carried on since then.

  • Nearly three decades on,

  • Apple was still following the marketing template

  • set out all those years ago.

  • This year, Steve Jobs was centre stage for the launch

  • of its latest tablet.

  • And just like in 1984, his pitch

  • was that Apple stands for something more than selling computers.

  • It's in Apple's DNA

  • that technology alone is not enough.

  • That it's technology married with liberal arts,

  • married with the humanities

  • that yields us the result that makes our hearts sing.

  • From the launch of the Macintosh

  • to the unveiling of the latest iPad,

  • two events, which span a quarter of a century,

  • and yet which reveal a consistent vision in the company Jobs created.

  • It wasn't a vision born of a business school education.

  • It wasn't a product of consumer focus groups.

  • The roots of that vision

  • lay in the Californian counter culture in which he grew up.

  • MUSIC: "The Times They Are A-Changin'" by Bob Dylan

  • # Come gather round, people wherever you roam... #

  • The young Steve Jobs came to believe technology

  • COULD change the world.

  • In California in the 1960s and '70s,

  • Jobs found himself at the centre of two colliding worlds.

  • The hippy movement

  • and computers.

  • # Oh, the times, they are a-changin'... #

  • We spent a lot of time driving around in his old Volvo.

  • I don't remember ever listening to anything other than Bob Dylan tapes.

  • We would play them over and over again.

  • Born in 1955, Jobs was adopted by a modest family

  • and grew up in the Santa Clara Valley.

  • It was becoming better known as Silicon Valley

  • as hi-tech firms sprang up.

  • And nearby,

  • San Francisco was becoming the epicentre of the counter culture.

  • Jobs opened himself up to both.

  • He's got a lot of compartments in his mind.

  • He was intense and thoughtful and I liked that about him.

  • At college, Jobs met Daniel Kottke.

  • Jobs quickly dropped out of his course

  • and lost no time tuning in.

  • We both got copies of this new book, Be Here Now.

  • It was written by Ram Dass and all about his trip to India,

  • searching for a holy man who could explain what psychedelics do.

  • It was fascinating for me

  • and for Steve also and so that was the basis of our friendship.

  • Jobs became a hippy,

  • pursuing paths to personal liberation.

  • He and Kottke took their own trip to India,

  • and LSD, as this extraordinary tape reveals.

  • He spent long periods at a commune on a farm in Oregon.

  • We spent a whole week harvesting apples and, while we were at it,

  • we decided we would just fast on apples and see how that worked

  • and, um...

  • it makes you very light-headed, cos it's just like sugar.

  • Jobs was inspired by the counter culture

  • to believe society was there to be reshaped.

  • As near as I can tell,

  • Steve Jobs always had that ambition to change the world.

  • And he expected to do that by empowering, um...

  • everybody.

  • But Jobs didn't share all the views of his counter culture buddies.

  • Many hippies saw computers as tools of oppression,

  • produced by big businesses

  • to extend the sway of other big businesses.

  • Jobs, though, had grown up experimenting with electronics at home.

  • People who've done that

  • have another angle on, er, whether technology is bad or good.

  • They think that technology that pushes them around is bad

  • and technology that they can

  • push in their own direction they think is good.

  • While he was still at school,

  • Jobs worked at one of the big computer companies near his home in Silicon Valley.

  • And he made a friend who would shape his destiny.

  • We talked about electronics. I said, "I design computers.

  • "I can, you know, do any of them." He had worked at Hewlett Packard

  • and built himself what's called a frequency counter.

  • So we hit it off.

  • Despite his hippy outlook, Jobs had a ruthless streak.

  • He was asked by the fledgling computer company Atari to design a new Breakout game.

  • Jobs asked Wozniak to do it in just four days,

  • telling his friend they would share the fee.

  • He presented it like we were splitting the money 50/50,

  • but actually, it was, you know, probably a different story.

  • Wozniak worked round the clock to deliver the goods

  • but later discovered Jobs had paid him considerably less

  • than half the sum he had received from Atari.

  • You didn't think, "I can't trust this guy"?

  • or "He's a bit too sharp for me"?

  • Steve could have just said,

  • "I need money to buy into this commune up in Oregon."

  • Have you never harboured any bitterness that he might have? I don't harbour bitterness.

  • Even if somebody just did that right to my face, I would not harbour bitterness.

  • But I would acknowledge the truth. Um, I did cry.

  • I cried, you know, quite a bit, actually, when I read it in a book.

  • The seeds of Apple were sown when Wozniak introduced Jobs

  • to a subterranean world of DIY technology enthusiasts.

  • The Homebrew Computer Club had ideas of how small, little people

  • who knew things about computers

  • could change the world, could become masters.

  • The Homebrew Computer Club took computing

  • out of the hands of big business.

  • What happened was you wanted a computer or a piece of software

  • or some product that didn't exist.

  • You looked around, it didn't exist. So you built it.

  • Then you showed it to your friends, cos everyone wants to show off,

  • and your friends would say, "This is great, can I have one?"

  • The values were sharing. If you have parts that can help people.

  • If you have knowledge, you'll share.

  • Wozniak brought Jobs to the Homebrew Computer Club

  • where he was showing a new computer he had made.

  • It would become the Apple I.

  • He saw a business opportunity that all these people wanted to build

  • my computer design, but they didn't have building skills.

  • And he thought, "We'll put out some money,

  • "design a PC board, we'll make it for $20, we'll sell it for $40."

  • And I didn't know if we'd sell enough to get our money back.

  • We'd have to sell about 50.

  • And I didn't know if there were 50 people who would buy my computer.

  • And Steve said, "Yeah, maybe we won't get our money back,

  • "but then for once in our lives,

  • "finally, the two of us will have our own company."

  • Wow, man. He was... OK, he was the leader on that.

  • In 1976, Wozniak and Jobs began selling the Apple I computer

  • from the Jobs family garage.

  • Buyers had to add their own case.

  • The birth of Apple as a company had been masterminded by Jobs,

  • a hippy with a business brain.

  • A surprising number of people who came along as hippies

  • and counter-culture folks in the '60s and '70s

  • wound up going into business.

  • Business was a way to have some freedom in the world.

  • Steve Jobs later said he'd set up the business almost by chance.

  • We started Apple simply because we wanted this computer for ourselves

  • and our immediate friends wanted one once they saw us build a prototype.

  • So gradually, we were pulled into business.

  • We didn't set out to build a large company.

  • We started out to build computers for us and our friends.

  • To Apple's co-founder, the reality is a little less idealistic.

  • Steve was always sort of focussed on if you can build things

  • and sell them, you can have a company. And the way you make money

  • and importance in the world is with companies.

  • And he always spoke that he wanted to be one of those important people.

  • So he'd got the business side pretty clearly.

  • He got the business side but he did tie it in philosophically with,

  • "This is how you get good things to people."

  • It wasn't, "I only want money."

  • It was Wozniak's next computer,

  • which propelled Apple into the stratosphere.

  • Released in 1977,

  • the Apple II was the first home computer with colour graphics.

  • Over the next three years, sales grew rapidly

  • to more than $150 million,

  • taking Apple from a suburban garage to the pinnacle of a new industry...

  • personal computing.

  • There are some great partnerships, aren't there, in the world?

  • One thinks of Lennon and McCartney and you and Steve Jobs.

  • Who was Lennon, who was McCartney?