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  • - Hello everybody,

  • thank you for coming.

  • Can we give one more round of applause

  • for all the filmmakers and great actors for RTX.

  • (audience applauding)

  • So we're gonna answer some questions now

  • and I'm going to introduce the people on this panel.

  • I'm Jack Davis, the CEO and co-founder of Crypt TV.

  • This is--

  • Does anyone know who this is?

  • - [audience member] Dead Meat.

  • - Oh, it's Dead Meat?

  • Oh shit, we got the wrong person here.

  • This is James Dead Meat Janisse.

  • Coming to the stage, perfectly fashionably late,

  • Annie Northman who's actually a Crypt fan

  • and that's why we wanted to have her here.

  • Maybe our biggest fan, our first fan,

  • we're very lucky to have her.

  • And Kate Krantz, Chief Content Officer of Crtypt TV.

  • - Oh yeah.

  • - And maybe looks like one more person's

  • gonna join the panel.

  • Oh oh.

  • Uh oh.

  • (laughing)

  • Hey, buddy.

  • It's pretty unsettling.

  • I guess that's the point though.

  • So thank you so much everyone for coming.

  • Yeah, get your pics in.

  • He'll get here.

  • Since we have such a great audience here,

  • and I appreciate everyone waking up early,

  • I wanna make this as much QandA as possible

  • so you guys can ask James any questions,

  • or Annie, or Kate, or myself.

  • But real quickly I'll start with you, James.

  • You are such a talent.

  • So much of your work is done in analysis

  • and you do opposite at Kill Counts in the podcasting.

  • How did it feel to shift gears and go back to

  • I know some of your roots in acting.

  • - Yeah, it was weird 'cause for the you know

  • past year I've just had total control

  • over all my creative projects

  • with everything on Dead Meat and the Kill Count

  • and everything else so

  • especially that hosting is very different than acting.

  • Hosting is just being myself

  • and goofin' around about movies,

  • and to show up on set and for them to be like,

  • "No, you're like a heartless psychopath."

  • I'll try, yeah alright.

  • - How did the blood fountain bath feel?

  • - Oh my God, dude.

  • So that was the last day of shooting on Look-See season two.

  • It was an overnight shoot

  • and it was in Griffith Park in Los Angeles,

  • like a large wildernessy park

  • and that was around five in the morning that we did that,

  • 'cause it was obviously the last thing we had to do

  • 'cause I would be covered in blood and so you know,

  • we're fighting to get it in before like dawn

  • and it was just, there was viscera in that fake blood.

  • There was like fake,

  • I think it was like pantyhose filled

  • with weird chunks of things

  • and on hit me in the mouth and it tasted weird.

  • And then I had to drive home covered in blood.

  • It was a weird experience.

  • - It's just so awesome that James thinks the blood is fake,

  • so cool.

  • (laughing)

  • So, Annie.

  • - Yes.

  • - Well as the Crypt fan up here

  • as our, maybe out biggest fan,

  • what's your immediate reaction to Look-See season two?

  • - It was really awesome, I really liked it.

  • - Well that's good.

  • So when did you discover Crypts?

  • Are you a big Rooster Teeth fan and in general

  • how much of your entertainment do you watch

  • on YouTube and companies like Crypt versus TV or film?

  • - Well at first I discovered Crypt on Facebook actually.

  • It was like a video.

  • It was a vampire video.

  • I was like watching that one

  • and I was just watching it thinking like,

  • "Oh my God, this is really cool."

  • And so after that I was just like

  • clicking through the videos,

  • and scrolling and scrolling,

  • and after that I was just hooked.

  • - Can you also show off this awesome vest you've made.

  • I'm sure everyone here appreciates it.

  • This I the coolest thing I've ever--

  • You can describe it to Kate.

  • (laughing)

  • - It is all by me.

  • Everything made by me, sewn by me.

  • (audience applauding)

  • - You know, obviously you have someone like James up here

  • who's so talented in Crypt in that community spirit

  • and the YouTube spirit.

  • We love people who make things themselves,

  • so very cool.

  • So, Kate, what do you think the biggest parts

  • of Look-See season two are?

  • Is there anything maybe you want to not explain,

  • but talk about that went into making this season

  • and where you see it going from here?

  • - Yeah, so I mean I hope you guys liked it.

  • We make it for you guys.

  • (audience applauding)

  • But our process, I don't know if you guys recognize

  • how much control you guys have over what we make at Crypt.

  • So we release the first season, you guys liked this guy,

  • which we like him too.

  • And we saw that you guys wanted a lot more understanding

  • of like how long has he been around, his backstory.

  • So that's why we went back in time to show you

  • that this guy's been around for a while.

  • - Of course it forms our understanding

  • of who we should be working with

  • to see what the fans respond.

  • So I wanna ask you James,

  • how do you incorporate your incredible,

  • very engaged community's feedback into your work

  • and how do you think they will feel

  • about seeing you in a new role?

  • And as it comes to being a creator, having a vision,

  • how do you also incorporate other people's feedback.

  • - Oh yeah, well there's kind of like a give and take

  • because a lot of people want me to do a lot of things

  • and if I did them all, I would just implode

  • from everything that they want.

  • And so it's definitely like just trying to balance

  • what I want to do, what I think would be best

  • for the channel and my own creative endeavors,

  • and then what people want too.

  • Because for instance like with the Kill Count

  • a lot of people are like do Infinity War Kill Count.

  • I'm like it's not really my thing, sorry.

  • Sorry if you're out there

  • and you just want me to do Infinity Wars.

  • It's just I feel like that's not being true to myself

  • 'cause I wanna incorporate what people want to see

  • and what people want me to do

  • while never feeling like I'm like selling out.

  • And that's why it's so fun with Crypt TV

  • is because Alex, all your team members hit me up in an email

  • and I actually missed the email until months later

  • and then I checked it out and I was like,

  • "Oh, this is--"

  • 'Cause I've gotten emails from like mobile games

  • and people who want me to plug their stuff and I'm like,

  • it just doesn't feel right.

  • It's not something I actually believe in.

  • But when I checked out Crypt's stuff

  • specifically Look-See especially, I was like,

  • "Oh, this is something I can really get behind."

  • And like when I talk about it I can be sincere about it

  • because I actually really do like it.

  • - It's so interesting to hear that.

  • Annie, how important is it to you as a fan

  • that the channels you follow stay organic in what they do?

  • And what would you say Crypt does well

  • and actually I'd even wanna hear when we stray away,

  • you feel like the community doesn't like?

  • - Well it also kind of depends on the person

  • 'cause some people may like the really scary stuff

  • and other people may like the really silly stuff.

  • Like me, I like it all.

  • I'm not that picky.

  • It can be silly, it could be funny, it--

  • - [Jack] The best type of fan.

  • (laughing)

  • I wish everyone was you.

  • - I'm not that picky, I love everything about it.

  • - Interesting.

  • And Kate, when it comes to the filmmakers you work with,

  • does anyone here an aspiring filmmaker

  • or wants to act, or direct, or write?

  • Okay, a few hands.

  • Put those hands up.

  • What would you say our process is

  • and what would you say, having worked in film before,

  • what opportunities does this platform give,

  • and how can people best take advantage of that?

  • - I mean, I'm a little biased

  • but I think that we are good about

  • abiding by best idea wins.

  • And if you have talent, you have passion

  • about what you're doing,

  • we will always love to work with you.

  • Like that's exciting to us more than anything.

  • It's not about the resume, it's about the vision

  • and we like cultivating fresh talent.

  • And we saw Landon off of a couple YouTube videos,

  • some of which were like his a cappella videos,

  • if you wanna deep dive into some of those, good time.

  • But he has a real point of view and perspective

  • so we were able to work with him

  • in a way that was digital-friendly.

  • He understands that the fan comes first

  • and that's something that we always hammer.

  • It's all about the fan.

  • And we can always create something new,

  • and fresh, and original if we abide by that.

  • - James, what's the most difficult part

  • of being a obviously self-supported?

  • You're making your own stuff,

  • your audience is what's getting you your Google checks.

  • What's the most difficult part of that though?

  • What are the things that you think people don't see

  • that goes into this you know, amazing work you do

  • but I'm sure feels like a labor of love sometimes.

  • - Yeah, it's the amount of work that goes into it.

  • And I try to show that, I try to show behind the curtain.

  • That's why I do editing live streams on my channel

  • to show people the work that goes into a video

  • because it seems like sometimes people think that

  • the video takes as long as it takes to watch it, to make it.

  • And they're like, "Why are you spending all this time

  • on a 15 minute video?"

  • And it can be up to like 40 hours for one of those videos,

  • and I'll do an editing live stream

  • and it'll be an eight hour stretch of editing

  • and people will be like amazed by it.

  • And I'm like, that's not even the whole thing, man.

  • That was just today's work.

  • So I really like, that's kind of

  • one of my missions on YouTube is to show people

  • the work that goes into being a YouTuber.

  • I think that a lot of people think

  • that it's just this really easy job to fall into,

  • and it's the dream job, I'll never complain about having it

  • because I love what I do and I love

  • that I get to do it, I'm very fortunate.

  • But I don't want people to think that it's a simple thing.

  • I want people to know the reality behind it,

  • that it's constant work and especially

  • relying on other people, it's very unstable.

  • And can be scary sometimes.

  • - And when it comes to relying on other people,

  • what do you think, do you feel like the movies

  • that you're actually covering, those studios, support you?