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  • CARL AZUZ: Welcome to CNN 10, your source for objective explanations of world news.

  • My name is Carl Azuz.

  • This is our second-to-last show of the season.

  • After tomorrow, we'll be off the air until January 3.

  • We're starting with news that a former lawyer for US President Donald Trump has been sentenced to three years in federal prison.

  • Last month, Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to lying to Congress.

  • There's an ongoing investigation involving Russia and the 2016 US presidential election, and Cohen admitted he misled Congress about a proposal to build a Trump property in Russia.

  • Cohen originally said that discussions about that

  • ended in January of 2016, when they had actually continued through the spring.

  • But that wasn't the only crime Cohen committed.

  • In August, he pleaded guilty to eight federal charges in a separate investigation.

  • Those included five counts of tax fraud,

  • one count of lying to a bank, and two counts of breaking campaign finance rules.

  • Those last two counts might involve President Trump,

  • because Cohen says Trump directed him to break those rules.

  • The president says no crime was committed

  • because campaign finance funds weren't used the way prosecutors say they were.

  • The judge who sentenced Cohen says his crimes were, quote, "a veritable smorgasbord of fraudulent conduct."

  • Cohen said he took full responsibility for his actions, and he criticized the president.

  • The lawyer said, quote, "time and time again, I felt it was my duty to cover up his dirty deeds."

  • Earlier this month, President Trump said Cohen lied to get a reduced prison term,

  • and should serve a full and complete sentence.

  • Meanwhile, the special counsel investigation continues into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election.

  • Across the Atlantic, in the United Kingdom,

  • unease over the Brexit from the European Union hangs in the air.

  • NICK GLASS: Long, long shadows on Westminster Bridge.

  • And with them, an abiding sense of weariness and fracture.

  • The last few weeks of British politics have been both divisive and interminable.

  • LILIAN GREENWOOD: We remain concerned that time is ticking.

  • Some of my constituents would like Brexit to be over and done with.

  • NICK GLASS: The cartoonists have been predictably merciless.

  • Theresa May on her marks going her way, everyone else in the opposite direction.

  • Both cartoons from a conservative newspaper.

  • THERESA MAY: As I have made clear, my focus is on the vote that will take place on the 11th of December here in this House.

  • NICK GLASS: And five days later.

  • THERESA MAY: This argument has gone on long enough.

  • It is corrosive to our politics, and life depends on compromise.

  • NICK GLASS: And a further six days later,

  • facing the prospect of a resounding defeat, she postponed the vote.

  • THERESA MAY: Does this house want to deliver Brexit?

  • - No!

  • NICK GLASS: Those looks.

  • If nothing else, Theresa May has been admired for her tenacity and resilience.

  • - 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.

  • NICK GLASS: A week, as they say, is a long time in politics, even at Christmas.

  • So "the lady is for turning," exclaimed "The Daily Telegraph."

  • The fact is, Britain still seems profoundly split over Brexit,

  • and so, toxically, are the two main political parties. And tempers are fraying.

  • JEREMY CORBYN: The prime minister is trying to buy herself one last chance to save this deal.

  • If she doesn't take on board the fundamental changes required,

  • then she must make way for those who can.

  • YVETTE COOPER: We still, even now, don't even know when she wants to bring this vote back,

  • or even what she wants the deal to be.

  • Does she not realize how chaotic and ridiculous this makes our country look?

  • NICK GLASS: "The Guardian" cartoonist has persistently pinioned Theresa May to Moby Dick in the water and at the cliff edge.

  • But like good old John Bull, we're all now wondering what's going to happen next.

  • One Labor MP in this place of historic ritual simply vented his frustration by briefly grabbing the ceremonial mace.

  • He was asked to leave the House.

  • Of course, as everyone is aware, this is only the beginning of the Brexit process.

  • A trade deal with Europe has yet to be negotiated.

  • Outside Parliament, the flags have been out, both British and European.

  • Protesters for and against Brexit have been in camp for days.

  • Some political commentators perceive Britain in limbo, teetering on the edge of a precipice, a constitutional crisis in prospect.

  • Nick Glass, CNN, Westminster.

  • CARL AZUZ: But for Prime Minister Theresa May,

  • there was some good news that broke last night.

  • She won a confidence vote from her own political party.

  • Here's what that means.

  • Prime Minister May can continue in her job as Britain's leader.

  • The vote tally was 200 to 117, with the majority of Conservative Party members indicating they do have confidence in Prime Minister May.

  • Before the vote, she said she would not run for re-election in 2022.

  • And as a result of the vote, she'll get at least another 12 months before her party could even hold another confidence vote.

  • But she still has a difficult job ahead of her.

  • Britain's Parliament has to approve any final deal on Brexit.

  • There's a lot of opposition in Parliament to the Brexit deal that the May administration negotiated with the European Union,

  • and the EU says it's not going to renegotiate that deal,

  • so the British leader's still caught between a rock and a hard place.

  • But while one of her rivals called on Prime Minister May to resign,

  • she says she's going to get on with the job of delivering Brexit and building a better future for her country.

  • 10-second trivia.

  • Which US president first declared the War on Drugs, calling drug abuse "public enemy number one"?

  • Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, or Ronald Reagan?

  • It was in 1971 that President Richard Nixon increased government funding to control drugs in America.

  • More than four decades later, drug abuse is still a problem in America, but the type of drug that's most abused has changed.

  • A new report from the US Centers for Disease Control says it's fentanyl, a man-made painkiller.

  • The CDC looked at drug overdose deaths between the years 2011 and 2016.

  • At the beginning of that period, fentanyl was involved in about 4% of all drug-related deaths.

  • Five years later, it was involved in almost 29% of overdose deaths.

  • That's more than heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine.

  • Fentanyl is an incredibly potent painkiller, and there are medical uses for it.

  • People with severe pain, or those who've just had surgery, are sometimes prescribed fentanyl.

  • But it's also made and sold illegally.

  • It's sometimes combined with other drugs, and that makes fentanyl even more deadly.

  • Drug overdoses are one major reason why the US government says American's life expectancy has declined for three years in a row.

  • The last time that happened, World War I and the Spanish flu were claiming lives.

  • Fentanyl was classified as an opioid, like heroin, hydrocodone, morphine, or methadone.

  • What makes these drugs so addictive and so dangerous?

  • DR. SANJAY GUPTA: Every eight minutes, someone in American dies from a drug overdose.

  • Now, most of the time, it's from an opioid like heroin or illicit fentanyl,

  • but also opioids like oxycodone or hydrocodone, the ones prescribed by doctors.

  • Take too much of any of these opioids and it can be deadly.

  • That's because they all work the same way.

  • They can dull pain and boost dopamine, giving some people a high.

  • But it's easy to get hooked on them.

  • Why?

  • Well, for one, your body can build up a tolerance.

  • The more you use, the larger dose you may need to get the same relief.

  • Secondly, you can become dependent on them.

  • In fact, your body releases natural opioids when you hurt yourself.

  • But if you habitually use opioids,

  • your body stop producing its own and relies on the drugs instead.

  • If you try and stop then, the body goes through withdrawal.

  • In fact, more Americans now die from opioids than from guns.

  • CARL AZUZ: The American Kennel Club recommends

  • that you put boots on your dog if you live somewhere that gets a lot of winter snow and ice.

  • South Dakota gets a lot of snow and ice,

  • so the Rapid City Police Department strapped some boots on Jerry the police dog for him to get used to.

  • Except he doesn't really seem to be getting used to them.

  • An officer eventually starts playing with Jerry, presumably to distract him and get him comfortable in his new boots.

  • There's no doubt they seem to give him paws, but they're not in-jerry-ous.

  • They're just like another layer of metatar-soles to keep his feet in-claw-lated and ensure his bark is worse than his frost bite.

  • I'm Carl Azuz for CNN.

CARL AZUZ: Welcome to CNN 10, your source for objective explanations of world news.

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[CNN 10] December 13, 2018

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