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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hi, welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • In one African nation, U.S. forces captured an al Qaeda operative.

  • In another, they raided a terrorist compound.

  • We told you about both of these operations yesterday, but today we have more details.

  • First, Somalia. The target was a man named Ikrima.

  • A suspected leader of the al Shabaab terrorist group.

  • A U.S. official says the mission was to capture Ikrima.

  • When it became clear that he couldn`t be taken alive, commanders made the decision for U.S. forces to get out.

  • In Libya, the target was al Qaeda agent Abu Anas al-Libi.

  • He was captured and taken to a U.S. Navy ship.

  • U.S. intelligence agencies interrogated al- Libi for information about al Qaeda.

  • He could be sent to the U.S. to face charges connected to terrorist attacks on American embassies.

  • The wars that you study in history class often involve nations fighting against other nations.

  • The war on terror is different.

  • When one leader is killed or captured, another can emerge, and these new leaders use new tactics.

  • STARR: Abu Anas al-Libi is one of the last of the old guard of al Qaeda operatives to be caught.

  • New networks and leaders are gaining strength, and U.S. commandos are on the front lines of going after them.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The Arab spring allowed a lot more travel, a lot more freedom of movement,

  • and we`ve seen groups cooperating with each other to launch attacks, pooling resources, and pooling training,

  • and that`s really concerning for American counterterrorism officials.

  • STARR: Al-Libi, a one-time associate of Osama bin Laden, was long wanted for his role 15 years ago in the attack on the U.S. embassies in Africa,

  • but the 9/11 era of al Qaeda operatives are largely dead or captured.

  • Key operatives like Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, an alleged 9/11 mastermind, he`s in detention at Guantanamo Bay.

  • Topping the list of still-wanted, Ayman al- Zawahiri, the leader of al Qaeda.

  • With a $25 million reward on his head, Zawahiri is believed to be hiding in Pakistan.

  • But some of the most hunted are part of the new al Qaeda affiliates, like al Shabaab in Somalia.

  • Its leader, Ahmed Godane, leads the group said to be responsible for the attack on the Nairobi shopping mall two weeks ago.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: By formally merging with al Qaeda, by doing an attack in which Americans were targeted, this group has put itself in the sights of the United States.

  • STARR: The U.S. is also hunting other emerging terrorist leaders.

  • Nasir Al-Wahashi (ph), a one-time bin Laden aide and leader of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, the Yemen-based group now considered the most lethal.

  • New al Qaeda leaders are social media savvy, using secure chat rooms and websites to recruit new young operatives.

  • Barbara Starr, CNN, the Pentagon.

  • CANDY CROWLEY, CNN ANCHOR: Coming on the 18th, you won`t be able to pay Social Security,

  • you won`t be able to pay Medicare, you won`t be able to pay all of these things?

  • JACOB LEW, TREASURY SECRETARY: I`m telling you that on the 17th, we run out of our ability to borrow, and Congress is playing with fire.

  • If they don`t extend the debt limit, we have a very, very short window of time before those scenarios start to be played out.

  • CROWLEY: Could you keep up on servicing the debt?

  • That is paying the interest on the U.S. debt, therefore not defaulting, as you (inaudible)?

  • LEW: Candy, if the United States government for the first time in its history chooses not to pay its bills on time, we will be in default.

  • AZUZ: That was Jack Lew.

  • He heads up the U.S. Treasury, whose job is to strengthen the U.S. economy and manage the government`s money.

  • That`s why he was discussing the debt ceiling, one of two major issues being debated right now in Washington.

  • The ceiling was created during World War I as a way to keep tabs on U.S. government spending,

  • but every time the U.S. has gotten close to it, Congress and presidents chose to raise the ceiling.

  • If they don`t agree to do that again by the time we hit it again, on October 17th,

  • the government will only be able to spend what it takes in, and that will mean that a lot of programs get cut.

  • Tom Foreman explained what in yesterday`s show.

  • You can view that in the archive on our website, CNNstudentnews.com.

  • The other issue, the partial government shutdown.

  • Congress and the president still haven`t compromised on government spending for the next year.

  • We`ve asked if you`ve noticed any effects of this.

  • Matthew said, "Yeah, I`m 16, so this is the first one in my lifetime.

  • The government is too big, so I like the partial shutdown."

  • Kathleen says, "People can`t get to Lake Mead for prime boating season, and that this impacts her entire community -

  • park rangers, boat repair, tour guides, everything."

  • These comments came from Twitter and from FaceBook.com/cnnstudentnews.

  • There is another debate going on in Washington, D.C.

  • It`s not about the shutdown, not about the debt ceiling.

  • It`s over the name of Washington`s pro football team.

  • The Redskins have been playing football for 80 years, but there`s some talk about changing that nickname.

  • Several media outlets have decided to stop using it, and just refer to the team as Washington, or Washington`s pro football team.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If it`s offending people, then it`s time to change it.

  • And this is a great time to do it.

  • Regardless of the history, regardless of its legacy, it`s offending - it`s offensive.

  • It`s a dictionary defined offensive term.

  • AZUZ: President Obama weighed in on the debate, saying if he were the team`s owner, he would think about changing the name.

  • Dan Snyder, who is the Redskins` owner, says that will never happen.

  • The team`s attorney argues that the name honors a legacy and tradition.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Hail to the Redskins.

  • That`s our song. It`s a song of honor.

  • It`s a song of tribute. It`s not a song of disrespect.

  • AZUZ: So Redskins, touchdown or turnover?

  • If you`re already on FaceBook, go to FaceBook.com/cnnstudentnews, like our page, and tell us what you think about this.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s time for the shoutout.

  • The line "What`s in a name?" appears in what Shakespeare play?

  • If you think you know it, then shout it out.

  • Is it "Hamlet," "King Lear," "Macbeth" or "Romeo and Juliet?"

  • You`ve got 3 seconds, go.

  • What`s in a name? A whole lot when those names are Romeo Montague and Juliet Capulet.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • AZUZ: You don`t run into too many Montagues or Capulets or Azuzes, for that matter.

  • Smiths are another story.

  • Smiths are another story. One of them, a high school senior, set off with his dad to meet people all across the country who share his same name.

  • The trip hit a snag in Seattle, and that`s where KOMO`s Kelly Koopmans caught up with the Smiths.

  • KELLY KOOPMANS, KOMO CORRESPONDENT: Pete Smith and Dave Smith both know a thing or two about generic names.

  • DAVE SMITH: Like I`m never in school and teachers can`t pronounce my name.

  • KOOPMANS: In fact, there are nearly 3 million other people with the last name Smith in the U.S.,

  • but this father/son duo is distinguishing itself through an adventure that`s anything but ordinary.

  • 17-year-old Dave hasn`t always done well in the classroom, so with his school`s permission,

  • Dave is earning history and English credits by criss-crossing the country with his dad.

  • They visit historic landmarks, they camp in national parks,

  • and Dave interviews complete strangers, with whom the only thing he has in common is a name.

  • PETE SMITH: It was my wife`s idea of, wouldn`t it be neat if you could network with all of these other David Smiths around the country.

  • KOOPMANS: And so, finding Dave Smiths was born.

  • The goal - to interview Dave or David Smiths in each of the lower 48.

  • Dave asks about their careers, their regrets, and advice.

  • Since September 12, they`ve hit 20 states, met 20 Smiths, all while camping in national parks.

  • PETE SMITH: Then we hit a big snag.

  • KOOPMANS: Until last week.

  • PETE SMITH: We`re just out here trying to go to the national parks, a once-in-a-lifetime trip, and they are preventing us from doing that.

  • KOOPMANS: When the government shut down, so did the national parks, forcing Pete and Dave to improvise.

  • So at least for now, they`ve decided to wait out the shutdown in Seattle, but it hasn`t stopped them from growing their network.

  • And as they add Seattle`s Dave no. 21, the Smiths show they`re one-upping the Joneses, living the gift of an ordinary name.

  • DAVE SMITH: Getting a lot of experience out of it, and just kind of trying to figure out what I want to do after the trip is over.

  • AZUZ: We`re going to keep rolling with this name theme, and look at the origins of the names of the states of today`s roll call.

  • Fairfield Center School in Fairfield, Vermont, a state whose name comes from the French words for green mountains.

  • How about the Thomas Johnson Jaguars?

  • They are from Maryland, which is named after the wife of England`s Queen Charles I.

  • And the Sercie (ph) High Lions are roaring in Sercie (ph), Arkansas.

  • Arkansas is a French interpretation of a Native American word.

  • Some of you may think there`s no such thing as too much candy.

  • This could put that theory to the test.

  • It`s not just a peanut butter cup, it`s the peanut butter cup.

  • The largest one ever made.

  • You got peanut butter in my chocolate, you got chocolate in my peanut butter.

  • Who cares, I want to eat it.

  • The ambitious baker combined 70 pounds of chocolate with nearly 160 pounds of peanut butter.

  • When he started, some people might have wondered, candy do it?

  • But now that he`s set a new record, I`m sure his cup`s running over from all the compliments that butter him up.

  • That sweet story is going to wrap things up for us today.

  • I`m Carl Azuz. We`ll see you again tomorrow.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hi, welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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