Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hi. I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • On September, 20th 2001 President George W. Bush declared the U.S. war on terror.

  • It`s something you`ve grown up with.

  • Two U.S. military operations that happened this weekend show it`s not over.

  • The operations were both in Africa, in countries that are 3,000 miles apart.

  • The first was in the Libyan capital of Tripoli.

  • This is Abu Anas al Libi. He is the member of the al Qaeda terrorist organization.

  • Early Saturday morning, a group of ten men surprised him on his way back to his home.

  • The men were U.S. Special Operations Forces.

  • A terrorism expert says that in a very precise operation the men snatched al Libi and were gone.

  • He was one of the FBI`s most wanted terrorists because of his alleged role in two bombings in 1998.

  • More than 200 people were killed and another 5,000 wounded when the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania were attacked by al Qaeda.

  • Libya`s interim government called the U.S. capture of al Libi a kidnapping.

  • It wants an explanation from Washington.

  • An American officials said the Libyan government knew about the operation.

  • The other weekend operation happened just a few hours earlier.

  • This was in the nation of Somalia, at a compound controlled by al Shabaab.

  • Now, that`s the terrorist group that was responsible for last month deadly attack in the shopping mall in Kenya.

  • Al Shabaab is also affiliated with al Qaeda.

  • On Saturday, a group of U.S. Navy SEALs raided the compound in Somalia.

  • A firefight broke out and the SEALS eventually withdrew.

  • They couldn`t confirm whether their target was killed, but no Americans were hurt in the raid.

  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said the two raids should send a clear message that the United States will never stop in its effort to hold those accountable who conduct acts of terror.

  • ANNOUNCER: It`s time for "The Shoutout."

  • Which of these states is part of Tornado Alley?

  • If you think you know it, then shout it out.

  • Is it West Virginia? Nebraska? Nevada? Or Tennessee?

  • You`ve got three seconds, go.

  • Nebraska is part of the region known as Tornado Alley.

  • The state sees around 50 twisters per year.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • AZUZ: At least one tornado touched down in Nebraska last Friday.

  • This storm flipped cars, raptured a gas line in the city of Wayne, Nebraska.

  • You can see some of the damage that it left behind right here.

  • The mayor of Wayne said luckily no one was killed.

  • Tornadoes usually hit in the spring and early summer, so the timing of this one was a little unusual.

  • That wasn`t the only severe weather around U.S. this weekend.

  • A strong winter storm slammed parts of South Dakota and Wyoming.

  • National Weather Service said reports of 20 inches of snow or more are pretty common throughout the region, some spots got up to four feet of snow.

  • And in Louisville, Kentucky, residents waded through knee-high water when heavy rains led to flooding there.

  • More than 80 people were evacuated from their homes, rescue crews had to use boats to get some of them to shelter.

  • One severe weather threat turned out not to make much of an impact.

  • Tropical Storm Karen was degraded to a tropical depression before it fizzled out over the Gulf of Mexico Sunday.

  • It broke out before it reached land.

  • Much of the U.S. government is still shut down.

  • National parks are closed, certain government services and reports were delayed.

  • But there are two bright spots for many government workers who have been furloughed, forced to take time off without pay.

  • One, the House passed a bill Saturday that promised they would be paid eventually.

  • The White House says the president would sign it, but we don`t know yet when the Senate will vote on it, that has to happen first.

  • Two, about half of those federal workers sent home are being called back into work starting tomorrow.

  • We`re talking about 400,000 people who are employees of the U.S. defense department.

  • More than 3 million government workers were not affected by the shutdown.

  • Has it affected you? Have you noticed effects from the partial shutdown?

  • If you`re at least 13 you can comment on our blog at cnnstudentnews.com.

  • If you`re already on Facebook, you can find us and like us at Facebook.com/CNN Student News.

  • And if you`re on Twitter, we are #cnnstudentnews and #carlazuzcnn.

  • The debate over the shutdown is about how the U.S. government spends money.

  • The debt ceiling is the limit on how much the government is allowed to owe for a spending it`s committed to.

  • It`s a separate debate, but it`s one that`s heating up because the country is getting close to that ceiling.

  • The treasury secretary says if the U.S. hits it, the consequences would be unthinkable.

  • TOM FOREMAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Take a look right over there. October, 17th.

  • That is the red letter date according to the Treasury, that is the date, upon which the government will have $30 billion to pay its debts,

  • and that`s a lot of money, but not compared to the money we owe.

  • About $60 billion on that day.

  • So, what are they going to do? Same thing you do if you had this kind of problem in your house?

  • They`re going to look at everything they can spend money on and pick some priorities.

  • For example, they might put money into Social Security, because that`s an important group a lot of people count on,

  • maybe some money into the interest on the debt, to keep it from getting any worse.

  • How about some money into Medicare and then maybe something into veterans and the military, and perhaps some money into Supplemental Security Income,

  • and then there is the problem:

  • the money is all gone, and yet hundreds of thousands of federal workers are now being unpaid,

  • all sorts of agencies are not being serviced, the FBI, the FAA, and many others. So, what can they do?

  • Well, first of all, they can realize that revenue keeps coming in,

  • and because a little bit comes in every few days, they could try to fund everybody to sort of a subsistence level,

  • not really making them healthy, but keeping them from closing down.

  • But that`s not really the solution, is it?

  • No, everybody here seems to agree the real solution is getting the debt ceiling solved,

  • so there is enough money to pay for everything fully, but that`s a whole different fight.

  • And until it`s solved, that red letter date just keeps looming.

  • ANNOUNCER: See, if you can I.D. me.

  • I`m part of the U.S. government.

  • My annual term starts on the first Monday in October.

  • I was established by Article 3 of the U.S. Constitution.

  • My members have included John Jay, Thurgood Marshall and Sandra Day O`Connor.

  • I`m the U.S. Supreme Court, the highest court in the land.

  • AZUZ: You know the Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S.

  • Here are five things you might not know about it.

  • Number one, it`s made up of nine justices.

  • Not judges, justices.

  • And those nine include the chief justice of the United States.

  • The Constitution gives Congress the power to determine the number of justices,

  • but it doesn`t say they have to be lawyers or judges first.

  • It also doesn`t` say how old they have to be to serve on the court.

  • The president nominates the justices, it`s up to the Senate to confirm them and once that`s done, they can serve as long as they want, unless they are impeached.

  • Two, Supreme Court justices decide what cases they`ll hear.

  • Every year about 7,000 petitions or cases are brought before the court.

  • 70 percent of them are turned away.

  • The court usually hears two arguments per day on the cases it chooses.

  • Its terms start in October, and they end whenever the court has heard all the cases it said it would.

  • Third thing, this is a different kind of courtroom.

  • There`s no jury, there are no witnesses.

  • Justices review each case in the form of a printed record.

  • Then they throw questions to attorneys on each side of the case.

  • Sometimes things get emotional, sometimes there`s laughter.

  • Fourth, no cameras are currently allowed in the Supreme Court, but that could change.

  • This has been debated in recent years with some justices saying it would make the court more open to the public;

  • others saying they might have a negative impact on the arguments.

  • The court does allow audio recordings to be played after proceedings are finished,

  • but as far as visuals go, you can only see sketches of what happens inside.

  • Number five, only one U.S. president has also been a Supreme Court justice.

  • William Howard Taft served as president of the United States from 1909 to 1913,

  • and then as chief justice of the United States from 1921 to 1930.

  • Check it, we`re adding three more states to our roll call map, and to do it, we`re leaving the contiguous and continental United States.

  • But we start in Nevada, with the Las Vegas Wild Cats from Las Vegas High School.

  • Thank you for watching.

  • Next we`re going to hop over to Alaska and check in with the Colony High School Knights.

  • Hello, everyone.

  • Finally, the Chargers from Pearl City High School in Hawaii put the 50th state on our roll call map.

  • Wrapping things up now with a tale out of Canada.

  • Here it is.

  • It`s a tail, dinosaur tail, or at least a fossil of one.

  • A construction crew accidentally dug it up last week when its equipment hit a rock with the tail inside.

  • The crew immediately stopped working, which is good news for fossil fanatics.

  • It turns out the rock is pretty fragile, and if the crew had kept digging, the fossil would have fallen apart.

  • If that had robbed scientists of the chance to check out this dino, you can bet it would have been a sore subject.

  • Thankfully, that`s not how the tale ended, but we have reached the tail end of today`s show, so we hope you have a great day.

  • We`ll see you tomorrow.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hi. I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

October 7, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

  • 1019 31
    VoiceTube posted on 2013/10/07
Video vocabulary