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  • Hi.

  • I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • I used to study English.

  • I'm used to studying English.

  • What's the difference?

  • Let's talk about it.

  • The two verbs used to and be used to are often confused by English learners.

  • These expressions sound similar but they mean different things so today I'm going to help

  • you learn when to use them and also how to create a sentence structure that's correct

  • and that's also going to be commonly used in daily conversations.

  • Let's start with the first one.

  • Used to.

  • If I said to you, "I used to go to bed late," what does this sentence mean?

  • What does imply?

  • Well it implies two things.

  • The first one is that there's a continual action that happened in the past.

  • I used to go to bed late means that continually, in the past, I went to bed late.

  • But it also implies something else that's really important.

  • It implies that I don't do this anymore.

  • This continual action has stopped.

  • My sentence was, "I used to go to bed late," but what it really means is, "I used to go

  • to bed late but now I don't."

  • You don't need to say that final part because it is implied.

  • Implied means that we understand what you mean, but we're not exactly specifically saying

  • it.

  • You could say, "I used to study English every day," and we understand in the past you continually

  • studied English every day but now you don't do that anymore.

  • You're continual actions have stopped.

  • I just shared with you a positive sentence using used to.

  • I used to go to bed late.

  • But what if we want to formulate a negative sentence?

  • What will that mean?

  • What will that imply?

  • If I said, "I never used to go to bed late," here we have a negative sentence.

  • Never.

  • I never used to go to bed late.

  • What does this mean?

  • What does this imply?

  • What are we saying without saying it directly?

  • Well, if you remember from the positive sentences, it means that there was a continual action

  • but now that action has stopped.

  • Here we have the opposite thing.

  • There was not a continual action but now there is an action that's continuing to happen.

  • If I said to you, "I never used to go to bed late," this means in the past I didn't go

  • to bed late but it implies something has changed.

  • Now I continually go to bed late.

  • You could say, "I never used to go to bed late but now I do."

  • Both of these positive and negative sentences show that something has changed.

  • An action that was continual has now stopped or an action that wasn't continual is now

  • starting.

  • There is a change in something that's happening.

  • Now that you know what this expression means, let's talk about the sentence structure.

  • How can you formulate and create a sentence that's accurate and correct with used to.

  • Well, the best way is to use used to plus an infinitive.

  • I used to go to bed late.

  • I used to study English.

  • I used to play with my sister.

  • Here we have used plus to play, to go, to study.

  • You're using these two parts together to create a beautifully grammatically correct sentence.

  • Before we go to the second expression I want to ask you a question.

  • What is something that you used to do when you were a child?

  • What did you used to do?

  • Now you might remember, this means something that was a continual action in your childhood

  • but now it doesn't happen anymore.

  • It has stopped.

  • You might say, "I used to do my homework every day."

  • "I used to climb trees."

  • "I used to call me friends."

  • And that means those things don't happen anymore.

  • They were continual in the past but now they're not.

  • Take some time.

  • Pause this video if you need to to write a sentence, to think of a sentence, to say a

  • sentence out loud using used to.

  • Now we're going to move onto be used to.

  • How can you make accurate sentences using this?

  • When can you use them?

  • And also what are the difference between used to and be used to.

  • Let's talk about it.

  • I'm used to drinking tea every morning.

  • Are you used to drinking tea?

  • Or maybe you're used to drinking coffee.

  • What are you used to drinking every morning?

  • This is using be used to.

  • We're not using the first expression, which is used to, we're adding a be verb.

  • I am used to drinking tea every morning.

  • Here our key expression, be used to, is linked with every morning.

  • You can kind of have a sense of something that is a habit.

  • Something that right now is continuing now.

  • It hasn't stopped.

  • It is continuing.

  • Every morning I drink tea.

  • And that's exactly what be used to means.

  • It's something that is continuing now.

  • It is your habit now.

  • You might say, "I'm accustomed to drinking tea every morning."

  • But this expression, accustomed to is pretty formal and it's not really common in daily

  • conversation so instead you can say, "I'm used to studying English every morning."

  • "I'm used to watching Vanessa's videos."

  • "I'm used to doing something."

  • Let's talk about how you can make be used to sentences grammatically correct.

  • Well, if you said, "I am used to sleeping late," here we have our key expression be

  • used to plus sleeping.

  • Sleeping.

  • This is an I-N-G verb so you need to have an I-N-G verb directly after this expression.

  • I'm used to studying English with Vanessa.

  • I'm used to drinking tea.

  • Make sure that you used that I-N-G verb.

  • Now I want to know for you, what's something that you're used to doing every morning?

  • You might say, "I'm used to hitting snooze on my alarm clock."

  • "I'm used to eating toast."

  • "I'm used to running out the door because I'm always late."

  • What are you used to doing?

  • This is a habitual action that happens all the time.

  • It happens continually.

  • Before we go, let's do a quick recap.

  • A recap is a review.

  • If you say, "I used to study English every day," this means that it was continual but

  • now it has changed.

  • Now you don't study English every day.

  • Or if you say, "I am used to studying English every day," this means that right now it is

  • a continual habit.

  • You're continuing to do it.

  • I hope that that second one is true for you but let me know in the comments, what is something

  • that you are used to doing.

  • Thanks so much for studying English with me and I'll see you again next Friday for a new

  • free English lesson here on my YouTube channel.

  • Thanks so much.

  • I'll see you later.

  • Bye.

  • The next step is to download my free e-book, Five Steps To Becoming a Confident English

  • Speaker.

  • You'll learn what you need to do to speak confidently and fluently.

  • Don't forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel for more free lessons.

  • Thanks so much.

  • Bye.

Hi.

Subtitles and vocabulary

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A2 US continual sentence bed study english action studying english

USED TO vs BE USED TO: What's the difference?

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    Samuel posted on 2018/10/19
Video vocabulary