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  • Hi. I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com. How can you improve your pronunciation so

  • that you sound like a native speaker? Let's talk about it.

  • Today's pronunciation lesson is sponsored by my course, the Fearless Fluency Club. Can

  • I sponsor my own video? Why not? I wanted to bring you this technique because this is

  • the same technique that I use every month in my monthly pronunciation lessons for members

  • of the Fearless Fluency Club. Today you get a sneak preview in this special pronunciation

  • lesson. I hope it will be useful to you. Are you ready to get started? Warm up those muscles.

  • You might be wondering what this is. Don't worry. We'll talk about it in just a second.

  • First we need to talk about this special pronunciation technique, and it is shadowing, or imitation.

  • This means that you're copying, you're repeating directly after me. You're repeating exactly

  • what I'm saying or what another native speaker is saying.

  • There are two kinds of imitation or shadowing. The first one is imitating words or phrases.

  • This means that you're focusing on emphasis, you're focusing on making sure that your intonation

  • for the sentence is correct. The second kind of imitation or shadowing is shadowing specific

  • sounds. This means that you focus on linking, on reducing, on vowel sounds. You're focusing

  • on more specific parts of the word. Today I have good news. We're going to practice

  • both of these techniques. I'm going to tell you a quick story in three

  • sentences about what happened to my wrist. I want you to listen carefully. I'm going

  • to be speaking quickly as if I were speaking to a friend. Are you ready? Let's listen.

  • "A few weeks ago I went to the doctor because my wrist hurt really bad. It turns out that

  • I have this kind of tendonitis from picking up my baby too much. He told me that I should

  • wear this brace for a couple of weeks and then it'll get better."

  • Whew. That was a little bit fast, wasn't it? Let's go back and I want to help you, sentence

  • by sentence, pronounce exactly the same way that I do. Are you ready? Let's start with

  • the first sentence. What we're going to do is we're going to listen to that first sentence

  • a couple of times. "A few weeks ago I went to the doctor because my wrist hurt really

  • bad." "A few weeks ago I went to the doctor because my wrist hurt really bad." "A few

  • weeks ago I went to the doctor because my wrist hurt really bad." I'm going to repeat

  • this sentence a couple of times. We're going to talk about the words that are emphasized,

  • the words that were de-emphasized, or the words that were not stressed, and we're also

  • going to talk about an important linking that often happens in English and that you saw

  • in this sentence. I said, "A few weeks ago I went to the doctor",

  • "I went to the doctor", "I went to the doctor". Which word in this part is emphasized? What's

  • the important word here? It's probably not "to". It's probably not "the". It is "doctor".

  • "I went to the doctor". "I went to the doctor". What about in the second part of this sentence?

  • What is the emphasized word? "because my wrist hurt really bad", "because my wrist hurt really

  • bad", "because my wrist hurt really bad". Can you emphasize those words with me? Try

  • to repeat with me. "Because my wrist hurt really bad". Those three words are important

  • and they're emphasized. Now that you know which words are stressed,

  • let's talk about which words are not stressed, the opposite of stressed, un-emphasized, de-stressed.

  • You can probably guess in that middle section of the sentence. "I went to the ... to the

  • ... to the ..." "I went to the doctor". Phew. How can you say that? How can you say that

  • middle part the same way that I am? Well, take a look at the screen and you're going

  • to see that "to" becomes "t", "t". The "o" is completely gone. We often link together

  • "to" plus the next word, especially when we're speaking quickly, so you can say "t the",

  • "t the", "t the", "t the" "t the". Can you say that? "t the doctor", "t the doctor".

  • Make sure that your mouth is not making an "o" sound. "to the doctor". It's only "t",

  • "t", "t". "t the", "t the", "t the doctor". All right. Let's go back to say this full

  • sentence all together. I think you can do it. Make sure that you emphasize the right

  • words. Make sure that you link the right words. Make sure that you de-stress the right words.

  • You can take a look at the screen here and follow along. I want you to speak out loud

  • if you are ready. I think you're ready. Let's do it. "A few weeks ago I went to the doctor

  • because my wrist hurt really bad." "A few weeks ago I went to the doctor because my

  • wrist hurt really bad." I'm going to pause and I want you to say this

  • yourself. Ready? Go ahead. Great work. Let's listen to the original sentence a couple of

  • times. "A few weeks ago I went to the doctor because my wrist hurt really bad." "A few

  • weeks ago I went to the doctor because my wrist hurt really bad." "A few weeks ago I

  • went to the doctor because my wrist hurt really bad."

  • In the second sentence, we're going to also be talking about emphasized words, de-stressed

  • words and linking together phrases. Let's listen to that second sentence a couple of

  • times. "It turns out that I have this kind of tendonitis from picking up my baby too

  • much." "It turns out that I have this kind of tendonitis from picking up my baby too

  • much." "It turns out that I have this kind of tendonitis from picking up my baby too

  • much." As we listen to this sentence, I want you to be thinking about a wave. Here there

  • are parts that are emphasized and then not emphasized. Emphasized and not emphasized.

  • Let's say the sentence altogether a little bit slowly. I want you to read on the screen

  • and I want you to try to follow those emphasized words. Are you ready? "It turns out that I

  • have a kind of tendonitis from picking up my baby too much." Did you follow that wave?

  • Let's talk about which words you're going to link together. The middle part of the sentence,

  • you might have heard I spoke pretty quickly. I said, "that I have a kind of", "that I have

  • a kind of", "that I have a kind of". How can we say this linking in the same way? Let's

  • break it down into individual sounds. This is shadowing sounds. I want you to repeat

  • exactly what I say. Are you ready? "thet I", "thet I". Am I saying "that I"? No. I'm using

  • an "e" sound here instead of an "a". "thet I", "the ... e ... e", "thet I", "thet I have

  • a", "thet I have a". Can you say that with me? "thet I have a kind of", "thet I have

  • a kind of", "thet I have a kind of", "thet I have a kind of". Can you say that quickly

  • with me? Ready? I want you to follow exactly what I'm saying and repeat with me. "thet

  • I have a kind of", "thet I have a kind of". All right. Let's try to say this full second

  • sentence, emphasizing those important words and linking that middle part together. "It

  • turns out that I have a kind of tendonitis from picking up my baby too much." Can you

  • say that yourself? I'm going to pause and I want you to use those speaking muscles.

  • Don't get tendonitis in your muscles. You can do it. Ready? Go ahead. Great work.

  • Let's listen to the original second sentence a couple of times. "It turns out that I have

  • this kind of tendonitis from picking up my baby too much." "It turns out that I have

  • this kind of tendonitis from picking up my baby too much." "It turns out that I have

  • this kind of tendonitis from picking up my baby too much."

  • Let's move on to the final sentence, the third sentence. Let's listen to it a couple of times.

  • "He told me that I should wear this brace for a couple of weeks and then it'll get better."

  • "He told me that I should wear this brace for a couple of weeks and then it'll get better."

  • "He told me that I should wear this brace for a couple of weeks and then it'll get better."

  • Okay. I want you to repeat this sentence with me following on the screen, and again thinking

  • about that wave, the wave of emphasized words and de-emphasized words. Ready? Let's read

  • it together. "He told me that I should wear this brace for a few weeks and then it'll

  • get better." "He told me that I should wear this brace for a few weeks and then it'll

  • get better." Did you emphasize those bold words?

  • Now let's talk about how you can link together that de-emphasized part. The middle section

  • of this sentence has two un-emphasized parts. Let's talk about the first one. "that I should",

  • "that I should", "that I should". Do you hear a similar sound that we just talked about?

  • "That I should". Is it "that"? If you were listening before, you'll know, no, it is "the

  • ... e ... e", "thet", kind of like an "e" sound. That's when we're speaking quickly

  • and linking words together in a natural way. "Thet I should", "thet I should", "thet I

  • should". Can you say that? Say it with me. Repeat with me, imitate, shadow my pronunciation.

  • Ready? Let's say it together. "Thet I should", "thet I should".

  • The end of this middle section also has another linked together phrase. It is "for a few weeks",

  • "for a few weeks", "for a few weeks". Am I saying "for" with an "o" sound? "For" like

  • the number four? No. Here, "fer" sounds, again, like an "e" sound. "Fer ... er ... er". "Fer

  • a few weeks". This is really common when native speakers are talking quickly. We're going

  • to change vowel sounds like we already saw with "that", like we already saw with "to".

  • Here you're going to see "for" being reduced and changed to "fer". "Fer a few weeks", "fer

  • a few weeks." Can you say this with me? Make sure that you

  • emphasize these words in the correct way and that you're using the vowels accurately. Ready?

  • Speak with me. "Fer a few weeks", "fer a few weeks", "fer a few weeks", "fer a few weeks",

  • "fer a few weeks". In the final part of this sentence, I said,

  • "and then it'll get better", "and then it'll get better". What is happening here with this

  • contraction? "It'll", "it'll". Why is there a "d" sound when really it's "it"? Well, this

  • is pretty common in American English. The "t"s will change to close to "d" sounds. You're

  • going to say, "idul". It sounds like "idul". "Idul", "idul". We need to say it quickly.

  • If you're going to use this type of pronunciation, you need to say it quickly and link together.

  • Are you ready? "And then idul get better", "and then idul get better", "and then idul

  • get better". Can you say it with me? Repeat with me. "And then idul get better", "and

  • then idul get better". Let's go back and say this full third sentence

  • together and then I'm going to pause and you can say it yourself. "He told me that I should

  • wear this brace for a few weeks and then it'll get better." Okay. I'm going to pause and

  • I want you to say the sentence all by yourself. Remember those bold, emphasized words. Remember

  • linking together. Remember the vowels that change. Take a deep breath. Ready? Go ahead.

  • Wonderful work. Let's listen to this sentence a couple of

  • times. "He told me that I should wear this brace for a couple of weeks and then it'll

  • get better." "He told me that I should wear this brace for a couple of weeks and then

  • it'll get better." "He told me that I should wear this brace for a couple of weeks and

  • then it'll get better." To conclude this pronunciation shadow imitation

  • lesson, we're going to go back and read all three sentences together. I want you to remember

  • the emphasized bold parts, the un-stressed de-emphasized parts, the linked together phrases,

  • the vowels that change. Take a deep breath. You can do it. We're going to start with the

  • first sentence. I'm going to speak not too fast, not too slow, and I want you to repeat

  • exactly with my voice. Are you ready? Get those muscles going. Let's start.

  • "A few weeks ago I went to the doctor because my wrist hurt really bad. It turns out that

  • I have a kind of tendonitis from picking up my baby too much. He told me that I should

  • wear this brace for a few weeks and then it'll get better." How did you do? Did your pronunciation

  • improve in this lesson? Do you see that there are a lot of specific pronunciation tips that

  • you can learn just from normal sentences like this? This is something that you learn every

  • month in the Fearless Fluency Club. You'll have the chance to imitate sentences from

  • me and also from another native English speaker, because I think it's important to learn different

  • accents, different intonation, different styles of speaking.

  • If you'd like to get pronunciation lessons like this every month, you can join the Fearless

  • Fluency Club for only $5 for the first month with the coupon code "NEW". I would love to

  • help you improve your pronunciation to be beautiful, natural and easy to understand.

  • Thanks so much for learning with me. Keep up the good work with your pronunciation,

  • and I'll see you the next time. Bye. Are you ready to speak English confidently

  • and fluently? Click the link to join the Fearless Fluency Club for only $5 for your first month.

  • Learn with real, fast English and speak with friends from around the world. Thanks so much

  • for learning English with me. Bye.

Hi. I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com. How can you improve your pronunciation so

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A2 US sentence doctor wrist brace pronunciation hurt

Best English Pronunciation Lesson: Speak Fluent English

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    Samuel posted on 2018/09/26
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