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  • (upbeat jazz music)

  • - [Chris] It is an art to make this dough

  • because when you spend

  • many hours making something that people enjoy,

  • it becomes a masterpiece.

  • That is what makes it all worth while.

  • - [Michael] Fresh pasta is more

  • of a special occasion.

  • You have to have practice at it.

  • It's a labor of love.

  • It's the smell of the egg when you cook it,

  • you can taste the egg and the flour,

  • it's pretty darn good.

  • (upbeat jazz music)

  • - [Chris] I think of what my father used to say,

  • "if it's an egg noodle,

  • that means you put egg in it."

  • When you're making,

  • like a fresh egg noodle dough,

  • with a machine where you now

  • have to put it together,

  • it involves using your hands,

  • your mind, and your heart.

  • (laughs)

  • We like to maintain quality

  • with our raviolis and egg noodles.

  • And the only way you can do that

  • is by using quality ingredients.

  • You really need to understand the dough,

  • understand the weather.

  • Is it too wet?

  • Is it too dry?

  • Do I add water?

  • Do I add a little more flour?

  • Basically have to be consistent with that dough.

  • That machine came from Italy,

  • it's been in the store since 1950.

  • I like to say sometimes,

  • I'm part of that machine.

  • In order to make that be of the quality we want

  • when we sell this.

  • The most bought pasta that we make and sell

  • is taken back to the home.

  • And I think the significance of something like that

  • is where unlike a store bought package pasta,

  • the texture, the flavor,

  • is gonna be different.

  • It has that homemade quality taste

  • as if they were there,

  • maybe making it with their grandmother.

  • My grandmother had some recipes

  • making pasta at home.

  • And in 1935,

  • they opened up Borgatti's Ravioli & Egg Noodles.

  • This is actually the recipe, of course,

  • my grandparents were using

  • when they opened up the store.

  • (bright violin music)

  • It is an art to make this dough

  • because you're involved with creating it,

  • kind of designing it,

  • finishing it,

  • using your hands and mind

  • and your heart.

  • Pasta should feel very soft,

  • but yet strong.

  • It becomes a masterpiece.

  • Been here 82 years.

  • I came into the picture around 1976

  • as an 18 year old.

  • I think of it as a dream of my grandparents.

  • I'm just, you know,

  • fulfilling their dream.

  • It is a passion, a love,

  • is when you spend many hours

  • standing there making something

  • that people enjoy.

  • A customer would come back and say

  • "I've had your noodles,

  • I can't imagine ever buying package pasta ever again."

  • When you hear things like that,

  • that is what makes it all worth while.

  • (bright orchestra music)

  • (jazz music)

  • I always think of like,

  • when it comes to food

  • or when you think about pasta,

  • it's something that brings us together.

  • We share good times and good moments, you know?

  • I used to come here when I was young,

  • help out, putting raviolis together

  • and packing raviolis.

  • When they first opened up the store,

  • in order to shape the raviolis,

  • they didn't have a machine.

  • They were actually making these raviolis

  • near the window of the store

  • so people could see what was going on

  • in this store.

  • When it was selling in the 1935,

  • when they opened up a hundred little pieces,

  • only cost you about one dollar.

  • My father used to say,

  • "use good quality ingredients.

  • Focus on the past,

  • what got you here?

  • What made this place what it is?

  • So always be mindful of that."

  • What started out as a family business,

  • continues as a family.

  • Keeping it simple

  • because at the end of the day,

  • am I doing it to make the money?

  • Or am I doing it because I know

  • when people sit down to this,

  • they'll say these are the best raviolis

  • I ever had in my whole life?

  • (laughs)

  • (upbeat jazz music)

  • With pasta,

  • it's something that brings us together.

  • I mean there's a variety of different ways

  • noodles could be served these days;

  • it's not always the same way.

  • You just feel good and go oh boy.

  • (laughs)

  • (smooth jazz music

  • - [Michael] Pasta is everywhere

  • and Italian food is everywhere.

  • But good pasta is something hard to find

  • because there's so many nuisances in pasta.

  • You have to really focus on

  • the equal parts of the flour and egg yolk.

  • I grew up in Wisconsin in a Norwegian family

  • and so food was very very important, always.

  • Whether it was breakfast or dinner,

  • there was something always going on in the kitchens.

  • When I started cooking,

  • there was no Food Network,

  • or it wasn't on TV like it is today.

  • I remember watching Yan Can Cook

  • and great chefs on the Discovery Channel

  • as a young person.

  • I was in college and made a decision

  • that after a football injury

  • that I was gonna become a chef.

  • And when I told my father that he said,

  • "that's fantastic,

  • but how do you expect to make a living?"

  • I started in the kitchen

  • just to kinda see if I really liked it.

  • And I remember going there the first day

  • and being mesmerized

  • by eggs and flour comin' together

  • and be something such as pasta.

  • Needless to say after the first day,

  • I was ready to roll.

  • Probably one of the things

  • that attracted me the most

  • was coming in early in the morning

  • and working with pasta.

  • It's something that I can get my hands messy with.

  • Never forget that cooking is a vocation,

  • it's something that use

  • and do with your hands.

  • Obviously I love fresh pasta.

  • I don't want people to think

  • there's anything wrong with dry pasta either.

  • But fresh pasta in some instances

  • is more of a special occasion.

  • It's a labor of love.

  • It doesn't happen instantly.

  • You have to have practice at it.

  • It's like doing anything,

  • you have to enough repetition

  • to know that when you touch it,

  • it feels right.

  • It feels dry.

  • It feels humid.

  • I can look at something

  • and give it a spray of water

  • because I know it needs it.

  • Those types of things

  • all come with time.

  • I'm still perfecting my craft.

  • You know we're constantly

  • pushing boundaries of pasta,

  • and we're having fun.

  • (jazz music)

  • The garganelli for example,

  • is a dish

  • that there's an old story.

  • About how garganelli became garganelli

  • is they were all laid out over

  • the work surface

  • and there was tortellini pieces of meat

  • put on every one of the squares

  • and a little cat

  • ate all the filling off the squares.

  • And so the chef is sitting there

  • with all these squares of pasta

  • and she didn't know what to do.

  • So she grabbed a comb

  • and she rolled them over a comb,

  • so that's how that pasta happened.

  • Now I don't know if there's any

  • real truth to that story or not,

  • but it sounds great.

  • We toss it very simply

  • with prosciutto and cream and parmigiano.

  • The beauty of that pasta is the fact that

  • it absorbs in the sauce quicker.

  • You can smell the egg when you cook it

  • and toss with cream,

  • you can taste the egg and the flour.

  • So it's all in the details.

  • To sit down and eat it a complete meal with pasta

  • is something I don't do all the time,

  • but it's pretty darn good.

  • (jazz music)

  • (sultry music)

  • Pasta is something that

  • is the cornerstone of the Altamarea Group business.

  • It's a cornerstone of what I do.

  • It's what people come to the restaurants for.

  • The pasta has fulfilled so many of my dreams already.

  • Knowing that people are coming

  • to eat your food,

  • that's pretty cool.

  • These people like came in on a train

  • like an hour and a half from work,

  • they go an hour and a half back.

  • Like you better pinch yourself, right?

  • It's really really something

  • and those types of things

  • are what keep me driving to make pasta

  • as close to perfection as we possibly can.

  • We're really sure

  • that we're cooking for the people

  • that we have in front of us.

  • And the person behind the stove

  • cooking the pasta has to be passionate about it.

  • And this is a pasta that is

  • bone marrow, braised octopus,

  • red wine, tomato, and basil.

  • Proud of that dish

  • and at the same time,

  • you will never be able to take off, so.

  • You're only as good as your last pasta dish.

  • That's what we like to say.

  • I don't know anything else either though,

  • do you know what I mean?

  • It's just kind of what I do.

  • - [Michael] It's my 29th year cooking in the kitchen.

  • - [Chris] I've worked with my father,

  • close to 40 years.

  • - [Michael] The most important thing really,