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  • - This is not sponsored.

  • Let's talk shutter speed, aperture, ISO,

  • all three things that you need to know how to use

  • without even thinking about it if you're doing photography.

  • Let's compare it to this bowl of cereal.

  • Let's call it the shutter speed.

  • I could eat it like this.

  • It's not the best, but it works.

  • It's definitely better now.

  • Let's call that milk the aperture.

  • But I'm still missing something.

  • A spoon.

  • Now all three, a much better experience.

  • I can enjoy this cereal the way it was meant to be enjoyed.

  • It's gonna work better for me.

  • It's easier to eat.

  • Tastes better.

  • Makes sense.

  • All three things compliment each other perfectly.

  • (upbeat music)

  • (techno music)

  • What's up everybody?

  • Peter McKinnon here.

  • And welcome back to yet another Two Minute Tuesday.

  • It's so great to have you here

  • and see all of your smiling faces.

  • Today we're talking camera basics.

  • Gonna try and keep it to two minutes.

  • Can't make any promises.

  • But I'm feeling good about it.

  • The cereal analogy to help those of you that don't

  • understand that shutter speed, aperture, and ISO

  • all compliment each other.

  • You can't use one without using the other properly.

  • You need all three of them.

  • So to take great photos and be fully manual

  • and proficient with your camera, your new camera,

  • or maybe your old camera, maybe you're getting back

  • into photography.

  • Those three things, that's six.

  • Those three things are super important

  • and they go together.

  • So let's start with shutter speed.

  • Shutter speed controls so many aspects of photography.

  • If you wanna get someone running fast pace

  • and you wanna stop that action

  • and make sure that photo's clear.

  • Maybe you're taking photo's of your kids

  • or your pets and they're running around really fast,

  • and you wanna make sure that they're not blurry,

  • having a high shutter speed opens that shutter

  • and closes it really, really fast, stopping the action.

  • So let's throw two minutes on the clock.

  • Good luck to me.

  • So breaking it down one by one.

  • Shutter speed.

  • Here's an example of me just doing

  • a straight up jumping jack to keep things easy.

  • We'll shoot this at one over 320.

  • So that's 320th of a second.

  • (camera click)

  • Boom, that's super fast.

  • You'll notice everything is nice and sharp.

  • Good to go.

  • Now, if we shoot that photo again,

  • let's drop the shutter down to a 60th.

  • That's much slower.

  • (camera click)

  • So it's opening and closing over more time.

  • But that also let's my limbs and things move in frame

  • because that shutter's not capturing it fast enough.

  • So you'll notice there's a bit of image blur.

  • A good example of a shutter speed moving from fast to slow.

  • Is take a look at this small little water fall here

  • with the water pouring over.

  • A fast shutter speed stops that action.

  • You can see the water clearly.

  • But if you slow that shutter speed down to even like

  • half a second it captures half a second of that flow

  • of water making it look like this.

  • So you can see how shutter speeds affect

  • not only just portraits but landscapes

  • and other items as well.

  • Now aperture kind of has two uses in photography.

  • Yes, it lets a ton of light in so you can get those

  • nice bright images and have fast shutter speeds.

  • But it's also gonna change what's happening

  • in the background.

  • If you're shooting a landscape, you wanna be able

  • to see that whole entire landscape

  • sharp, perfectly clear, good to go.

  • So you wanna make sure that aperture

  • is something like eight or 11 or 22 or really, really high

  • to make sure you're capturing detail.

  • So look at this portrait for example.

  • This was captured with the aperture at F14

  • is what it is called.

  • So that's a really, really, small opening of light.

  • But all the detail is there.

  • Everything in the background.

  • But we don't wanna see all this stuff in the background.

  • It's not the most pleasing background.

  • So if we open that aperture all the way up

  • as wide as it goes to 1.4, it's gonna make everything

  • in the background not in focus.

  • Now, we're gonna have tons of light coming in

  • because it's opened all the way.

  • So we'll have to make that shutter speed faster,

  • so it's not capturing as much light.

  • And then when you combine those two things together

  • you get an image like this.

  • (techno music)

  • The background is more shallow.

  • It puts more focus on the subject.

  • The portrait, the item that you're shooting,

  • the person that you're shooting.

  • And that's where those two things come together.

  • Now, like we've mentioned before different lenses

  • are going to give you different results.

  • Not every single lens can open up super wide.

  • Some are longer than others.

  • Some are short.

  • There's a myriad of different lenses

  • that do different effects.

  • That's why we change lenses.

  • That's why certain lenses evoke certain emotions.

  • That's why certain lenses are used for sports.

  • Certain lenses are used for documentaries and movies.

  • And that's what makes this whole art form fun.

  • Because there's so many different tools

  • to tell so many different types of stories.

  • Depending on what you're interested in.

  • Now where ISO comes into play

  • is mostly in low light situations, indoors, at night.

  • And then on top of that if we don't have enough light,

  • we can crank up the ISO.

  • For those of you who used to shoot film

  • back in the film days, you would buy certain ISO films.

  • 400 ISO film, 800 ISO film.

  • The best way to explain ISO it's kinda like explaining

  • it as fake light.

  • It's the sensitivity to the image sensor.

  • The actual device in your camera

  • that's capturing the photo.

  • When we're changing the ISO we're changing the

  • sensitivity of that sensor to light.

  • So just think of it as fake light.

  • You're inside, you've got your shutter speed

  • where you want it,

  • your aperture is as wide open as it can be

  • but you still need a little more light.

  • But if you got nothing else you can crank that ISO

  • and technically ad fake light to your photo.

  • It brightens it up.

  • But with each increment of ISO

  • the brighter it gets, the more you use it,

  • the worse the image becomes.

  • The more grainy it becomes.

  • The more pixilated it becomes.

  • Noisy images is what it's commonly referred to.

  • Now the better the camera is

  • the better they are in low light.

  • The higher ISO's they can shoot at without getting

  • grainy or noisy.

  • So my recommendation to you is that if you

  • are beginning in photography

  • and you are learning these things,

  • learn them well.

  • Make sure that you know your aperture,

  • your shutter speed, and your ISO.

  • When you know those three things so well

  • you can look at a scene, you can look at a photo

  • and instantly say, oh my shutter speed was too high,

  • oh my aperture wasn't opened wide enough,

  • that lens isn't fast enough.

  • I could probably bump the ISO.

  • When you know by just by looking at a photo

  • how to fix it, that's when you should move on

  • to the next step.

  • It's like any other skill in your life

  • that you've just forgotten about.

  • When you put your shoes on you don't think about

  • how you're putting them on.

  • You just put them on and you go.

  • So that's it for me guys.

  • I hope you liked this video.

  • I hope you got something out of it.

  • I'm gonna try and sprinkle in camera basics videos

  • here and there.

  • There's a large audience.

  • I don't think everyone's at the same skill set.

  • So I think it's important to try to kinda curate

  • some of this content to help people

  • that are further along, and people that are just starting

  • or somewhere in the middle.

  • Or maybe not sure if they're interested.

  • And that's the reason for a video like this

  • because I realized I don't have anything

  • like this.

  • So I hope it helped you out.

  • Hit that like button if you did.

  • Subscribe if you aren't already.

  • And, and, I will see you guys in the next video.

  • (techno music)

- This is not sponsored.

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B1 US shutter iso aperture speed camera photo

CAMERA BASICS!

  • 34 4
    bb hh posted on 2018/09/07
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