Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Shut down.

  • At 12:01 am on Tuesday, the possibility became a reality,

  • and the sides in this U.S. government face-off were blaming each other.

  • BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: One faction of one party in one house of Congress in one branch of government

  • shut down major parts of the government,

  • all because they didn`t like one law.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The president refused to compromise.

  • Senator Reid has not even, he`s already said he`s not going to go to conference,

  • he`s not going to go to the constitutional event where we`re supposed to come together and compromise.

  • AZUZ: About 2.6 million government employees were expected to keep working during the shutdown.

  • More than 840,000 were facing furloughs, sent home from work without pay.

  • One group definitely gets a paycheck during a government shutdown - Congress.

  • And Athena Jones explains why.

  • ATHENA JONES, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Congress` approval ratings may be at historic lows,

  • but that won`t stop members from getting paid,

  • even during a government shutdown.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They`ll still get paid. Is that appropriate?

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: No.

  • JONES: I worked the phones and hit the halls.

  • If there is a shutdown, members of Congress still get to collect their paychecks.

  • What do you think about that?

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I actually think nobody is above the law, and that means the president, the attorney general, as well as us.

  • All of them ought to be putting that on hold until this is resolved.

  • JONES: And what will members of Congress do with their money?

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I am urging my fellow members of Congress to donate their pay to charitable causes.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I am going to be writing a check back to the U.S. Treasury and giving my pay back and standing in solidarity with everyone else.

  • JONES: So why do senators and representatives get to collect their paycheck while hundreds of thousands of federal employees will have to go without?

  • Blame the Constitution.

  • Ordinary members of Congress in both chambers make $174,000 a year.

  • Congressional leaders make more.

  • No Congress can change its own salaries.

  • It can only vote to change the pay of future sessions of Congress.

  • Senator Boxer says she`ll probably give her paycheck to charity,

  • but that is no consolation to government workers like Dee Alexander (ph).

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: If we`re not getting paid, I don`t think Congress should be paid either, because I think they need to kind of feel what we`re feeling.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It is time for the Shoutout.

  • What is the most valuable brand in the world?

  • If you think you know it, then shout it out.

  • Is it McDonald`s, Apple, Coca-Cola, or Facebook?

  • You`ve got 3 seconds. Go.

  • According to a report about corporate branding, Apple is the new No. 1 when it comes to the most valuable brands.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • AZUZ: What`s in a brand? Value for one thing.

  • For the past 13 years, since consulting company Interbrand started ranking what it calls the best global brands, Coke was it.

  • The world`s most valuable brand.

  • But just this year, Apple ripened, reaching the top spot thanks in part to the release of its newest iPhone.

  • And Google found its way into the report`s second most valuable spot.

  • This does not mean Coca-Cola has lost value.

  • Interbrand says Coke gained value over last year by 2 percent,

  • but Apple jumped 28 percent compared to 2012;

  • Google a whopping 34 percent.

  • And when you look at how the estimated values of these brands break down,

  • you see Apple at the top, with an estimated worth of $98.3 billion.

  • So what?

  • Well, the shift shows the starring role technology is taking in our lives.

  • The majority of this year`s top 10 most valuable brands are associated with high technology.

  • Interbrand says their products change buying behaviors and how we communicate with each other,

  • but the rankings are not necessarily the last word on popularity.

  • If you turn to Facebook for a measure, Coke has more than 73 million likes;

  • Google has around 15 million,

  • and Apple has a comparatively tiny 9.7 million.

  • In fact, when you look at who likes FaceBook itself, you`ll see 95 million thumbs ups.

  • Almost as much as the other three brands combined.

  • Hispanic Heritage month celebrates the culture and traditions of Americans from Spanish speaking countries.

  • Today we`re checking out five English words that come from Spanish.

  • Maybe you can tell the difference between a gator and a crock,

  • but did you know that alligator comes from a Spanish word, allegarto (ph)? It means the lizard.

  • You`re used to eating in a cafeteria.

  • If you were at a Spanish speaking country, you`d pronounce it cafeteria, and it would be a coffee shop, not a lunch room.

  • There is no y in the Spanish word canion (ph), but there is in the English word canyon.

  • Canion (ph) means a long tube or pipe, and canyons are deep valleys, kind of like a half-pipe.

  • We talked about hurricanes a lot on our show.

  • The word goes back to Spanish sailors who learned about uracans (ph) from Caribbean natives.

  • Finally, patios. In the U.S., they`re usually off one side of a house.

  • In Spanish architecture, patios are often open courtyards inside a house.

  • But the word is spelled the same in both languages.

  • This edition of Career Connections recognizes the achievements of Latino and Hispanic Americans.

  • We`re profiling Diana Heredia for her work in the fashion industry.

  • Heredia is a textile director for world famous fashion designer Jason Wu.

  • She`s traveled to places like Italy, Paris, Switzerland, not too bad.

  • And Diana tells you her role is more than glitz and glamour.

  • DIANA HEREDIA, TEXTILE DIRECTOR FOR JASON WU: I am the director of textile development at Jason Wu at New York City.

  • My main responsibility is managing the scheduling of all the raw material that goes into producing a collection.

  • That could be anything from working on the color palette to working on prints.

  • Developing new treatments for leathers and skins.

  • Went to Syracuse University thinking I`m going to be an architect,

  • and after my freshman year, I decided that wasn`t really for me.

  • And that`s how I ended up in fashion.

  • Funnily enough, I grew up around fabrics and sewing machines my entire life.

  • Both of my parents sew.

  • So I didn`t think I would dedicate my life to this field,

  • but I guess it was a part of me all along.

  • I get to design four different collections, work on four different collections a year.

  • So you know, there is a lot of research that goes into it, you know, it`s a challenge every time.

  • Some ideas that Jason presents me with require a little bit more historical research, like for the fall 2012 collection, it was based off of the Qin dynasty in China.

  • What I love the most about my job is that there is very little redundancy to my day to day.

  • I`m going to say the obvious, but it was working on Michelle Obama`s gown.

  • I`ve been to the museum twice this year, and every time it`s like a little bit emotional.

  • My advice would be to if you do have a passion, don`t ignore it.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: See if you can ID me.

  • I am a body of water located on the U.S. East Coast.

  • Specifically, I`m an inlet that borders parts of Maryland and Virginia.

  • I was the site of the Civil War battle between the Monitor and Merrimack warships.

  • I`m the Chesapeake Bay, and my name comes from an Algonquin word which means great shellfish bay.

  • AZUZ: At least 10 different rivers flow into the Chesapeake Bay.

  • Explorer and conservationist Philippe Cousteau was examining some of the environmental concerns during their journey.

  • Along the way, he`s breaking down some of the terminology and he`s helping us show you real life examples of stuff that`s right out of your science book.

  • PHILIPPE COUSTEAU, CONSERVATIONIST: I`m Philippe Cousteau here for CNN STUDENT NEWS on an EarthEcho expedition,

  • and the word of the day is tributary, because we`re in Virginia on a tributary of the Rappahannock River, in the Shenandoah National Park,

  • and I am with Park Ranger Sally Hurlbert here.

  • Sally, tell me a little bit about what is going on.

  • SALLY HURLBERT, PARK RANGER: Well, we`re looking up at the (inaudible) falls,

  • and the water that you see cascading down the falls is actually on a journey all the way to the Chesapeake Bay.

  • COUSTEAU: So this feeds into the Rappahannock river.

  • HURLBERT: Yes.

  • COUSTEAU: And then into the Chesapeake, and ultimately into the ocean.

  • HURLBERT: Right.

  • AZUZ: Teachers, you can find more about the EarthEcho project and Philippe Cousteau`s work at CNNstudentnews.com.

  • Go to the resources box, and look for the earthecho.org link.

  • Today`s roll call is very presidential.

  • We`ve got two schools named after U.S. presidents.

  • The first is Herbert Hoover High.

  • It`s home of the Huskies, and it`s in Glendening (ph), West Virginia.

  • Before he was president, Dwight Eisenhower was a general, and in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Eisenhower Generals make today`s roll call.

  • Finally, the Titans from Tollgate High School in Warwick, Rhode Island take us home.

  • Not unusual to see surfers in Huntington Beach, California.

  • It is slightly unusual to see four-legged surfers,

  • but that`s what this is all about at the Surf City Surf Dog event.

  • A chance for radical rovers to hang ten, or 20.

  • We`re not sure how an idea like this started, but it`s coming down the pipeline for a while now.

  • This is the fifth year of paw-ticipation from determined surf dogs.

  • Now, they`re all just riding a wave of excitement.

  • Dogs with experience staying overnight in temporary locations make the best wave riders, because after all, they`re used to boarding.

  • Kind of a long way to go for that, but it`s going to wipe out all the time we have.

  • For CNN STUDENT NEWS, I`m Carl Azuz.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Shut down.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

October 2, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

  • 1040 31
    VoiceTube posted on 2013/10/02
Video vocabulary