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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hey, I`m Carl Azuz delivering you October, 1st edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • First up today, uncertainty in the U.S. government.

  • It was scheduled to partially shut down at midnight last night.

  • When we produced today`s show, Democrats, Republicans and the president still had no deal on how to fund the government.

  • And they were still blaming each other for not compromising.

  • In a recent CNN/ORC poll, most Americans called a potential shutdown bad news.

  • JOHN KING, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Look, seven in ten Americans, 68 percent say it would be a bad thing to shut the government down for a few days.

  • What about the prospect of a shutdown that ran on longer for a few weeks?

  • Hard to get eight in ten Americans to agree on any political questions, but they agree on this:

  • a bad thing to shut the government down, for more than a few weeks.

  • AZUZ: Stock market was unhappy with all this.

  • Markets generally don`t like uncertainty.

  • And the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which gives snapshot of the whole market, dropped more than 120 points during the day.

  • At U.S. capital, the Senate rejected the House bill to fund the government, but delay Obamacare.

  • The controversial Affordable Care Act has been a major sticking point in government funding.

  • Both the House and Senate say they want to keep the government funded.

  • But the Republican controlled House wanted changes to Obamacare first.

  • The Democratic controlled Senate and the president didn`t want Obamacare touched.

  • So, that`s how things stood when put this show together.

  • But teachers, new details are at cnn.com.

  • ANNOUNCER: Time for the "Shoutout."

  • Which U.S. state has the highest number or residents under 18?

  • You know what to do.

  • So, is it New York, Texas, California or Florida?

  • You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • It makes sense that the most populated state, California, also has the highest number of young people.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout."

  • AZUZ: There`s a new law that aims to protect California`s young people when it comes to social media.

  • So, what they put on sites like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram.

  • Under the law, those companies would have to give young users a virtual delete all button.

  • But this only applies in California and it may not apply very effectively.

  • KYUNG LAH, CNN CORRESPONDENT: The cost of our oversharing,

  • but new California law wants to give children under 18 a chance to erase the digital footprint, literally, passing what`s called "The Eraser Button Law."

  • By 2015 if the California minor wants something like a video or picture deleted, the Web company has to do it.

  • JAMES STEYER, FOUNDER, COMMON SENSE MEDIA: They deserve the right to take that back, and the right to have that forgotten,

  • and not haunt them in their college admissions or trying to get a job,

  • or even in the way that they interact with some of their peers.

  • LAH: James Steyer, founder of Common Sense Media advocated for the law`s passage.

  • He admits, it`s not perfect, but it`s a step forward and predicts it will be replicated in other states and even at the federal level.

  • STEYER: Up until now, most of our laws have been written in reality by the companies, and they`ve just taken your data and your privacy.

  • ERIN LA ROSA, SENIOR EDITOR, BUZZFEED: The law to me just sort of shows how little lawmakers know about the Internet and how the Internet actually works.

  • LAH: Erin La Rosa is the senior editor at BuzzFeed, a site that feeds off buzz in the social online world.

  • She supports attempts by advocates and lawmakers to protect children,

  • but says in the online world, this law won`t do anything. Here`s why.

  • LA ROSA: So, let`s just take a photo of us.

  • LAH (on camera): We`ll do a selfie.

  • LA ROSA: Yeah. So, now we`ve got this photo. LAH: OK.

  • LA ROSA: Right. So, I`m going to upload this, let`s say, at Twitter.

  • LAH (voice over): Seconds after posting to Twitter, La Rosa`s colleague downloads the photo like millions of us do every day.

  • LA ROSA: This copy has now been shared on Facebook, on another person`s Twitter.

  • It can remove one copy, the other copies are still there forever.

  • LAH (on camera): So, trying to control this is ludicrous. LA ROSA: Impossible.

  • LAH: Impossible.

  • LA ROSA: Yes. It`s not going to happen, especially under this law.

  • LAH (voice over): Kyung Lah, CNN, Los Angeles.

  • AZUZ: There are a lot of Spartans out there watching us.

  • Far more than 300 and that makes us feel pretty good if they like us.

  • First today, we`re going to Bixby High School in Bixby, Oklahoma. Go Spartans!

  • Next, we swing up to Homestead High School in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Go Spartans!

  • Finally, Stanford Academy in Stanford, Connecticut. This is Spartans!

  • Good thing it`s not Thermopylae.

  • Well, as I mentioned at the start of today show, we are at the beginning of October,

  • and one event that`s being observed is national bullying prevention month.

  • And bullying is something that it`s difficult to define for everybody to agree on what exactly what it is, let alone to determine how to prevent it.

  • But we still got the ideas of some Atlanta area students for today`s CNN STUDENT NEWS viewfinder segment.

  • MAYA CARR, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: I think that you have to put student at certain scenario,

  • so we all see the documentaries in school, but if there was like a play or something,

  • that the children got interacted in, that will be great.

  • If we could see that like every day and like try to really feel how that person felt -- I think it`ll have a greater impact.

  • GARLAND JONES, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: Stop bullying. Make people aware of it and just say that what would you -- like how would you feel if you were in that situation of being bullied?

  • BENJAMIN GOLDFEIN, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: It`s not really stopping the bullying, but it`s making people more accepting,

  • because if people are more accepting, then bullying will stop.

  • We have to instead of trying to get rid of it, you need to prevent it in the first place.

  • MARILYN PRIMOVIC, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: I think we stop bullying by looking out for each other.

  • You have to look out for your neighboring, your friends and just identify it when it happens.

  • You`d be able to stand up for them and support them through it.

  • And kindly let the bullying -- hey, you`re bullying.

  • GORDON CLARK, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: I think students will stop bullying once they learned to understand each other

  • through doing sports together or doing leadership workshops or (inaudible) in clubs, or even eating lunch together.

  • I think understanding is the cure to bullying in America.

  • MICK MUSEY, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: You have to instill the mindset to not bully at a young age,

  • so starting with maybe like kindergartners, firs graders, second graders and elementary -- primary schools to,

  • you know, instill that bullying is bad and it can really harm kids in the future.

  • ROMA PARIKH, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: And I guess the easiest way to do it is just to make people aware that everyone else is just as flawed and human as they are,

  • and that if you`re going to m fun of someone else for something,

  • then you`ve got to realize that there`s always a chance for someone else to make fun of you, so why do it at all?

  • ANNOUNCER: Time for a "Shoutout" extracredit.

  • Where would you find the phrase -- "government of the people, by the people, for the people?"

  • Here we go. Was it in the Gettysburg address?

  • Preamble to the Constitution,

  • Declaration of Independence or "I Have a Dream" speech?

  • You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • These words were spoken in the Gettysburg Address by President Abraham Lincoln.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout" extracredit.

  • AZUZ: Has new technology given us a new look at President Abraham Lincoln?

  • When he gave that speech, the Gettysburg Address, media coverage was pretty much limited to newspapers and photographs.

  • There may be only one or two known photos of Lincoln on that day he gave the speech.

  • But a North Carolina teacher believes he might have found another.

  • Jennifer Phillips of affiliate WNS spoke to a former animator for Disney who spent his life working with pictures.

  • JENNIFER PHILLIPS: You can see him, he`s here and here.

  • CHRISTOPHER OAKLEY, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA ASHEVILLE: I`ve drawn Lincoln, I`ve sculpted him, I`ve painted him.

  • PHILLIPS: So, this assistant professor, along with his new media students, decided to work on a virtual Lincoln project.

  • OAKLEY: This is the speaker stand.

  • PHILLIPS: The idea to recreate the Gettysburg Address through animation,

  • and to do that, he had to study pictures of President Abraham Lincoln.

  • And that`s when he says he saw it.

  • OAKLEY: And I thought -- oh, who is that? And then it struck me, oh, my God, that`s Lincoln.

  • PHILLIPS: This is the picture at Gettysburg. And with the eyes of an animator ....

  • OAKLEY: Because you`re trained to notice differences.

  • PHILLIPS: Oakley says you`ll see a familiar top hat,

  • and to make sure he put a photoshopped pick over the blurry image he found, and says he got a match.

  • OAKLEY: I wrote to the Library of Congress and they said,

  • have you ever scanned it at high resolution the left side of this?

  • PHILLIPS: And so the boy, who admired the 16th president and brought characters to live, never imagined this.

  • OAKLEY: I had a new piece of evidence that nobody had ever seen before.

  • AZUZ: Robert Duckey, Disco Duck, the Ugly Duckling, Donald Duck, "Duck Dynasty", they all have something in common --

  • none of them are as big as this --

  • at 40 feet tall, you can see why this thing got top billing,

  • when it recently floated down the Alleghany River in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

  • It was done as a way to promote harmony.

  • Seriously, an artist said, all the waters of the world are like a global bathtub,

  • so since we`re all in it as one family, we`ve got to take care of each other.

  • Well, at least when asked what this is all about, no one tried to duck the question.

  • I know some might call me a lame duck for quacking puns like that, but we tend take to them like a duck to water.

  • Some puns are like sitting ducks. We get all our ducks in a row, and at showtime, it`s duck soup (ph).

  • We`re going to duck out for now, but if you watch again tomorrow, that will be just ducky.

  • For CNN STUDENT NEWS, I`m Carl Azuz.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hey, I`m Carl Azuz delivering you October, 1st edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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