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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: It is Friday, and that is awesome. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • We talked earlier this week about the tense relationship between the United States and Iran.

  • In recent years, Iran`s controversial nuclear program has added to that tension.

  • Iran says the program is for peaceful purpose, the U.S. and other countries believe Iran is trying to build nuclear weapons.

  • One way the U.S. and other countries have reacted to Iran`s nuclear program is with sanctions.

  • Now, these are punishments, penalties that restrict Iran`s economic activities.

  • Sanctions are designed to pressure Iran into talking with the international community.

  • Yesterday, Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Jawad Zurif and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met in New York about Iran`s nuclear program.

  • Here`s why that`s significant.

  • It`s the first meeting between high level U.S. and Iranian officials in more than 30 years.

  • ANNOUNCER: Is this legit?

  • Ben Franklin was the first person to run the U.S. Postal Service.

  • It`s true. In 1775 the continental congress appointed Franklin as the first U.S. postmaster general.

  • AZUZ: Back in the 18 century, the good old days, it cost six cents to send the letter through the mail.

  • In 1975, 200 years after Ben Franklin became the postmaster general, it cost ten cents.

  • Today, a first class stamp cost 46 cents, but the postal service wants to increase that to 49 cents staring next January.

  • Then you might say, who cares, I don`t send anything through the mail.

  • That`s part of the issue.

  • Every year the amount of mail the postal service handles drops by hundreds of millions of pieces.

  • The postal service lost $16 billion in 2012, another 1740 million from April through June of this year.

  • One of the ways to make up those losses is by increasing stand prices.

  • The postal service board of governors describes that move as the last resort,

  • this three cent increase could raise $2 billion for the postal service, but the board of governors has to approve it first.

  • The postal service isn`t the only part of the U.S. government that`s facing some serious economic questions.

  • Congress and President Obama have to consider something called the debt ceiling.

  • This is a limit on the total amount of money the U.S. government can borrow,

  • the ceiling, $16.7 trillion of debt is in sight and heeding it could have some consequences.

  • CHRISTINE ROMANS, CNN BUSINESS ANCHOR: The shutdown maybe more imminent, but the administration`s officials I`m speaking to are more concerned about the debt ceiling, which happens after that. Why?

  • Well, during a shutdown, mandatory spending wouldn`t be affected.

  • That means seniors, for example, could still get their Social Security payments, but that`s not the case if the debt ceiling is not raised.

  • There would be no spending once the government runs out of cash on hand. And what day is that? October 17th.

  • That`s the day when the U.S. will have less than $50 billion.

  • Maybe $30 billion on hand, and the government can`t borrow any more money.

  • That means, just like when your bank account is empty, and you can`t find any extra source of cash,

  • the government will have to stop paying some of its bills, bills like our interest payments on some of our debt, right?

  • We wouldn`t be able to pay interest to China on massive loans.

  • What about Social Security?

  • There could be people who wouldn`t get Social Security checks.

  • Medicare and Medicaid.

  • When the money runs out, how do you pay for that? 110 million people are on one of those programs.

  • And what could be worse here, what really could be worse here, is we don`t know the reaction from the markets.

  • How many hundreds of billions of dollars could we owe in borrowing costs if interest rates rise.

  • We don`t know until we get there, and by then, the damage is done.

  • AZUZ: U.S. government debating what to do with its money -- how do you handle yours?

  • The amounts are probably smaller, but you still have to decide how much to spend, how much to save.

  • So, for today`s CNN "Viewfinder" we asked some high school juniors and seniors for their best monetary advice.

  • MYKEL SKINNER, HIGH SCHOOL JUNIOR: Don`t spend it all in one place, because you`re going to need it.

  • You know, it`s easy to spend money and it`s hard to make it back.

  • So, I would say save your money, like especially as a girl, like when you go shopping, and there is a sale, you want to -- you just want to go crazy a little.

  • But you need to really learn to restrain yourself and don`t spend it all.

  • ROMA PARIKH, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: It`s not just flips of paper, even a credit card.

  • It`s a lot of work that goes into it, and that`s something I`ve learned by having a part time job

  • and needing to get funds for a vacation school trip that I want to go to is that it`s not easy.

  • You think, it is. Because you kind of grow up having you parents pay for things,

  • but when you get to it, when you get down to it,

  • there is a lot more to getting money and spending it.

  • AMAYA CARR, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: So, budget and to write everything down.

  • I`ve recently got my first job,

  • and I can estimate how much money I make, but I know I have to spend,

  • and I know what I need to save, like for college,

  • so I`ll write everything down, and it makes it easier.

  • BENJAMIN GOLDFEIN, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: Well, I`ve always been taught in my household that whatever I made regardless,

  • even if it`s a birthday gift, if I`ve worked at a job, at least 50 percent of it goes in the savings.

  • MARILYN PRIMOVIC, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: The most valuable lesson I learned about money is to save.

  • Save, save, save. Especially in this economy.

  • As a kid, I always grew up -- and whenever I got birthday money, I would stick in the bank and at the time interesting rate was really good.

  • So, I would just get excited every month to get a little bill in the mail and see how my interest did,

  • or whatever and so, just encourage kids save money and put it away and --

  • oh, and don`t buy sodas when you`re at restaurants, because that`s expensive.

  • AZUZ: Our "Roll Call" map is filling up.

  • Today, we`re adding three more states we haven`t mentioned until now.

  • Let`s start out western Montana.

  • That`s where you`ll find the Renegades from the Rapelje High School.

  • We`d been to South Dakota, now we have the North.

  • The Devils Lake Firebirds from Devils Lake, North Dakota

  • and the Averill Park Warriors from Averill Park, New York, round out today`s "Roll Call."

  • Thanks to all of you for watching.

  • Football players at Utah`s Union High School played the game last Friday.

  • Afterward, the coach kicked them off the team, all of them.

  • Administrator said they haven`t gotten a single complaint from parents about this.

  • GEOFF LIESIK, KSL REPORTER: This isn`t your typical football practice, especially during homecoming week.

  • Neither is this, but it`s exactly what Union High head coach Matt Labrum wants to see.

  • MATT LABRUM, HEAD COACH: We`re still practicing, but we`re practicing on some different skills.

  • LIESIK: The Cougars have had a few academic issues this season, as well as some attitude problems.

  • And last week, the coach has learned that a player or two might have been involved in the anonymous cyber bullying of another student.

  • LABRUM: This felt like everything was -- was going in a direction that we didn`t want.

  • Our young man going and so we felt like we needed to make a stand.

  • LIESIK: So, after Friday`s home game against judge, the coaches made all their players hand in their jerseys.

  • KARTER ROOK, FOOTBALL PLAYER: I was definitely said, because I love playing, and I always want to play.

  • JORDAN GURR, FOOTBALL PLAYER: I figured we`ve just been cut (inaudible) we`ve done.

  • I`ve figured there is no more games.

  • LIESIK: Players left the locker room in tears, telling their parents the team had been disbanded,

  • but their season wasn`t over, they were being given the option to play again under some very specific terms,

  • outlined in a letter signed by the entire coaching stuff, but called for the election of new tea captains,

  • two days of community service instead of practice,

  • mandatory attendance and a character education class and at a study hall session.

  • LABRUM: And I think it`s going to bring our team closer, I think we`re going to be more accountable,

  • not only for ourselves, but for our buddy next to us.

  • LIESIK: We got (ph) to a number of coaches around the states.

  • Some fear this punishment might be too extreme while others say coach Labrum knows his players and what`s best for them.

  • As for this school district and the school, they said they`ve had nothing but support from parents.

  • AZUZ: All but a handful of the Union High players met their coach`s requirements.

  • They got their jerseys back on Wednesday night.

  • And they played their homecoming game tonight.

  • On our blog, we`ve been talking about the NCAA`s rules concerning the amateur status of college athletes.

  • Many responded like this,

  • one thing that makes college football so powerful is the fact that these students are playing a game they love, and not doing it for the money.

  • However, I believe that policies should be put into place to provide for all medical expenses that result from playing."

  • Abby thought so, too.

  • They bring in a lot of money for the school when they play, so the school should at least cover it if they get injured."

  • Joshua writes, "If they players are getting a scholarship, they are saving money that would go to college expenses. Doesn`t that mean they are getting paid?"

  • From Tyler, "They are in college to learn and college is a good way for scouts to see your capability to play in the NFL or any other pro sports.

  • Kobe or Kobe writes, "If the NCAA is making money off students athletes, they are, in a way, being taken advantage off, which isn`t fair towards them."

  • But Jenna says, "They are playing in college and not the NFL.

  • If they want to further their career then need to graduate in time and move forwards with their sport."

  • The University of Wisconsin`s Camp Randall Stadium can hold more than 80,000 people.

  • For one moment last Saturday, all eye were on two.

  • This is Captain J.R. Lund. She`s been serving in Afghanistan for six months.

  • This is Lund`s daughter Bella.

  • The 13-year old had no idea that her mom was standing 50 yards behind her until this moment.

  • YouTube video captured Captain Lund and Bella sharing a personal moment in front of the badger faithful.

  • Even in the midst of tens of thousands of Wisconsin fans we`re guessing (ph) they enjoyed their reunion without anyone badgering them.

  • It`s time for us to go, we will reunite with you after the weekend. Have a great one.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: It is Friday, and that is awesome. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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