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  • Hi, I'm Anne Marie with Speak Confident English and welcome to your Confident

  • English Wednesday lesson. Today I need to go to the store. Or I have to go to the

  • store. I must go to the store. What do you think? Are all of those sentences the

  • same? Do they mean the same thing with need to, have to, and must? Or are there

  • some differences in English?

  • If you're not sure, then be sure to watch today's lesson. We'll talk about how

  • English speakers use these in real life, so that you can use them in the same way.

  • Let's start by looking at need to because it's a little bit special, it's a

  • little bit different from have to and must. A few examples using need to

  • include: I need to get my haircut; it's out of control. Or I need to call my mom

  • on her birthday. She really needs to do well on her exam this week. In each of

  • those examples, when we say need to: I need to,

  • she needs to, it shows that something is important or it's something that we

  • should do. And that is the key. It is something that we should do or it's

  • important to us to do. She needs to do well on her exam this week because it's

  • important for her future. Maybe it's important for her opportunities to go to

  • a good university. I need to call my mom on her birthday because it's important

  • to me and yes, I should do it. It's the polite and loving thing to do to call my

  • mom on her birthday. Now let's look at have to and must

  • because there are many situations where both can be used and they have a lot of

  • similarities. So we'll start with how they are similar and we'll also look at

  • some differences. With have to and must we're expressing that something is an

  • obligation, that it's a necessity or responsibility or something that is

  • required. It's not just important, it is required. For example, I have to get to my

  • meeting on time or I must get to my meeting on time. When we

  • use those verbs, we're showing that it is an obligation, it is a necessity. Maybe if

  • I'm late to my meeting, my boss will be angry, maybe I'll get fired from my job

  • and I don't want to take that risk. It is not only important it is a necessity.

  • Another example is: you must have a passport to travel abroad or you have to

  • have a passport to travel abroad. In that situation, it's not only important but it

  • is a requirement. It's the law. You must or have to have a passport to travel to

  • another country. In those examples, must and have to are similar to need to but

  • they focus more or they have a feeling, a connotation of something that is an

  • obligation, it is a necessity. But we can also use must and have to in some other

  • similar ways. For example, both can be used to say that something is likely. For

  • example, maybe one day I go to my office, I walk in and I say oh my gosh it's so

  • cold in here! The heater has to be broken or the heater must be broken. In those

  • sentences I'm expressing the likelihood or that I think something is likely. It

  • is likely that the heater is broken. We also use must and have to

  • to show emphasis. Emphasis is when we use stress on a word or a syllable to show

  • its importance, its value. For example, I could say: call me after your exam. I'll

  • be really curious to know how it went. Or I could add

  • must or have to to show emphasis. That it's really important to me that you

  • call, that I truly am curious. For example, you must call me after your exam. I'm

  • going to be really curious to know how it went. Or you have to call me after

  • your exam. And finally both must and have to can be used to show that we really

  • desire something or we really want something. For example, I can say I must

  • have pizza on my birthday or I have to have pizza on my birthday. It's not

  • something I eat very often and I really want it on my birthday; it's something I

  • desire. It's definitely not a requirement. Well, maybe it's a requirement. But it is

  • something I desire and when I use must or have to it helps me express that. Now

  • that we've talked about how must and have to are very similar, let's look at

  • a few differences. Generally speaking, must is more formal which means we don't

  • use it as often in spoken situations or conversations. Now I did say generally

  • speaking. That means it's true in general. And there are always exceptions. There

  • are people who have different preferences when they speak, so you will

  • hear it in conversation and other speaking situations, but generally we use

  • have to when we're speaking. And again, generally speaking, I can say that

  • Americans tend to use have to. So if you're learning American English, you're

  • traveling to or living in the United States, then you will be more likely to

  • hear have to in conversations. Now we know that must and have to

  • both are used for obligation, necessity, and requirement. But is it

  • something that your boss said you have to do or is it something that you feel

  • you must do? Is it a rule at the university that you have to turn off

  • your phone during an exam or must you turn off your phone when you

  • study because it helps you stay focused? In those questions we're talking about

  • where or who the obligation comes from. Is it something coming from you, your own

  • personal obligation or is it an outside authority or rule? A university rule, a

  • workplace regulation, something your boss said you have to do. Another general rule -

  • remember general means most of the time but not all the time - must is often used

  • for those personal obligations. I must turn off my phone when I study because

  • it's too distracting. And have to is often used for outside authority or

  • rules. For example, you have to turn off your phone during exams because it's a

  • university rule or regulation. Okay, let's pause for a moment. How are you

  • doing? This lesson is a big lesson. There's a lot of information to think

  • about, a lot of general rules to remember. So let's pause relax for a moment. If you

  • need to, pause the video, think a little bit about what we've talked about and

  • then we have one final thing to discuss. Okay if you're ready to go, let's go on

  • to the very last part of our video. In all of the examples that we've discussed,

  • we've focused on positive sentences and in positive sentences need to, have to

  • and must are often similar. Must and have to are more similar. But

  • what happens when we use those in a negative sentence? For example, you

  • mustn't smoke in the building. If I say you don't have to smoke in the building,

  • are those two sentences the same? Do they have the same meaning? You mustn't smoke

  • in the building. You don't have to smoke in the building. No. They definitely do

  • not have the same meaning and that can be tricky. In positive sentences they

  • seem very similar but when we use them in a negative form it completely changes

  • the meaning. When we use must not, it means that something is prohibited. It is

  • against the rules or against the law. You cannot do it. But if I use have to or

  • need to in the negative form, for example I don't have to or she doesn't need to,

  • it means it's your choice. There's no obligation.

  • There's no rule. It's up to you. So we can definitely say you mustn't smoke in the

  • building. It's prohibited. It's not allowed; it's unacceptable. Or we could

  • also say she mustn't be late again or she'll be fired. She mustn't be late

  • again or she'll be fired. But for have to or need to I could say, I'm so glad I

  • don't have to get up early on Saturdays or I'm so glad I don't need to get up

  • early on Saturdays. In those sentences I'm saying that it's my choice. There's

  • no time I have to get up. I can get up early if I

  • want. I can get up late if I want. It's my choice. Okay we are finally done with

  • this lesson and you made it to the end. I'm glad that you did. I know that these

  • can be really challenging so now I want you to get some practice so that it

  • becomes easier for you to use these more naturally, in the same ways that native

  • speakers often use them. In the online lesson, I have a few challenge questions

  • for you where I want you to create your own example sentences. Use your real-life

  • using these verbs in some of the situations that I've talked about in

  • this video. So I have four challenge questions for you in the online lesson.

  • Make sure that you take a look at those and then share your comments, your

  • thoughts, practice in the comment section at the bottom of the lesson. It's the

  • best place to join the discussion and get feedback from me every week. Thank

  • you so much for joining me. I look forward to seeing your answers to my

  • challenge questions. And I'll see you next week for your Confident English

  • Wednesday lesson.

Hi, I'm Anne Marie with Speak Confident English and welcome to your Confident

Subtitles and keywords

A2 BEG US obligation lesson mustn necessity exam birthday

Have to vs. Need to vs. Must - What's the difference in English?

  • 699 79
    Samuel   posted on 2018/07/15
Video vocabulary

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