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  • Hi everyone. It's Jennifer here with a different kind of vocabulary lesson.

  • We're going to look at foreign words in English.

  • It's actually not such a strange topic because we all know that language

  • develops and changes over time.

  • There are different influences on a language, and that includes the influence of other languages.

  • So are you curious to know some of the foreign words in English? Then let's get started.

  • Carpe diem!

  • I'm going to share eight examples of foreign words in English, and you already heard the first:

  • Carpe diem. This is Latin and it means seize the day.

  • Hear this pronounced different ways. I hear carpe diem...

  • carpe diem... and there may be other variations.

  • We use the expression "carpe diem" to encourage someone to make the most of an opportunity.

  • One film that made this expression very memorable is Dead Poets Society

  • with Robin Williams.

  • If you haven't seen the film, I recommend it. You can easily find the "carpe diem" seen from Dead Poets Society

  • on YouTube.

  • So the next time you feel inspired to take a risk, you can cry out, "Carpe diem!"

  • Speaking of inspiration, let's talk about aficionados or aficionados. I've heard it said both ways.

  • We borrowed this word from Spanish, but here in the u.s. we definitely say it with an American accent.

  • It comes from the Spanish verb "to inspire affection."

  • You can be an aficionado of something: an aficionado

  • of wine, of art, of tennis. Or we could use a noun modifier before

  • "aficionado": a wine aficionado, an art aficionado, a coffee aficionado.

  • Similar words are "lover" and

  • "enthusiast." We can talk about a wine lover, an art enthusiast, a tennis enthusiast.

  • So aficionados are people who love something, and they've gained a lot of knowledge about this subject with great enthusiasm.

  • You can tell me in the comments what kind of aficionado you are

  • One language we've borrowed heavily from is French.We could have a few lessons on French words used in English.

  • Here's one you may hear in the news these days:

  • te-à-tête.

  • Literally, it means head to head, but it refers to a private conversation.

  • Think of it as two people putting their heads close together for a private talk.

  • I was at the hairdresser's the other day, and I heard a woman talking to her friend as she was leaving.

  • She said, "Call me sometime next week. We'll have a tête-à-tête."

  • But what really caught my attention was her pronunciation.

  • She said a tête-à-tête/

  • I don't say it that way, but again there are variation with these foreign words in English.

  • So although I sayte-à-tête, you may hear other variations likete-à-tête.

  • If you're ever unsure about pronunciation, you can go to an online dictionary,

  • especially a learner's dictionary.

  • They'll have speech models for you to listen to.

  • Another resource I've recommended to learners is YouGlish. Youglish.com

  • Just type in the word and you can even filter for British, American, and Australian English.

  • Think about the world news right now. Do you know which two political leaders are scheduled for a tête-à-tête?

  • Here's another French word and we use it to talk about leadership. Laissez-faire.

  • In my mind, this kind of sounds like the adjective "lazy."

  • So that's probably how I learned the meaning when I first heard laissez-faire.

  • Literally, it means to allow someone to do something.

  • We use laissez-faire as an adjective to refer to

  • the kind of approach that doesn't call for tight control or a lot of intervention.

  • It's a hands-off approach, so we can talk about a lazy fair approach, a lazy fair attitude.

  • Again let's go over some variations in pronunciation.

  • I've heard laissez-faire...

  • Here's a question.

  • Would you prefer to work for someone who supervises you very closely or would you prefer

  • someone who has a very laissez-faire leadership style?

  • Did you know English also makes use of Italian words?

  • When the weather grows warm in the U.S., more and more restaurants offer alfresco dining.

  • That means eating in the open air. In other words, these restaurants have outdoor seating.

  • Alfresco can be written as one or two words. I've seen it both ways.

  • It comes from the Italian word "fresh." So think of alfresco dining as eating in the fresh, open air.

  • Do any cafes in your area offer alfresco dining? Or maybe at home you sometimes eat alfresco.

  • The next foreign word is a fun one, and I admit even I have trouble spelling this one.

  • But luckily I don't usually have to write it. I only use it in conversation.

  • Doppelgänger.

  • Can you guess the origin?

  • Doppelgängerr. It's German.

  • It usually refers to someone who looks exactly like you.

  • You might tell a friend, "I saw your doppelgänger at a store yesterday. It was so weird."

  • As I understand, this word comes from the German idea of having a double, like a ghostly double.

  • Have you ever seen someone's doppelgänger?

  • Let's shift back to French. If I talk about people leaving en masse,

  • voting en masse, or

  • protesting en masse...

  • Can you guess what kind of numbers I'm talking about?

  • I'm referring to a high number, right? En masse refers to the whole, a whole group.

  • We use it as an adverb to explain that people are acting as a whole group, one body.

  • Why might people rush to the exits and mass?

  • I'll end with an expression that will help you explain your position on a topic.

  • Per se comes from Latin and it means by itself or in itself.

  • Sometimes you need to explain your general view or opinion on a matter and then comment on a more specific

  • aspect or case.

  • Here's an example. I don't have a problem with tattoos per se, but covering yourself

  • head-to-toe with them can be somewhat distracting.

  • Here "per se" is like "in general" or "overall."

  • What do you think about social media?

  • Use "per se" to create a contrast between a broad view and a narrow view.

  • Here are the questions I asked. You can use them for practice. Answer in the comments. Carpe diem!

  • I'll do my best to offer corrections as time allows, but you can also help one another okay?

  • If you enjoyed learning foreign words with me,

  • please like this video and follow me on social media for more language practice throughout the week.

  • That's all for now. As always, thanks for watching and happy studies!

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  • You

Hi everyone. It's Jennifer here with a different kind of vocabulary lesson.

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A2 US diem foreign dining french lazy heard

8 Foreign Words in English

  • 707 1
    Samuel posted on 2018/06/18
Video vocabulary