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  • Previously on Genius...

  • Einstein may be the brightest mind

  • I have yet taught.

  • PERNET: He's a menace!

  • (yelling)

  • You are skipping classes

  • and challenging your instructors.

  • What I want to know, sir, is why?

  • My name is Professor Philipp Lenard.

  • - Herr Professor. - Mileva Maric.

  • One doesn't lose track of the sole woman in the room.

  • MILOS: She's up all night, filling her brain with things

  • I can't begin to understand.

  • Then how do you know she understands them?

  • EINSTEIN: I'm head over heels in love

  • with your mind. Be my partner.

  • In life, in love,

  • in endless scientific pursuit.

  • PAULINE: How is Marie? Everyone is quite excited.

  • - About what? - The courtship, of course...

  • - the potential of it! - I'm going to be a professor.

  • I will think for thinking's sake.

  • That is the most indulgent thing

  • - I've ever heard. - Oh, don't leave

  • like this, Albert.

  • Liar! How could you be

  • so careless with my heart?!

  • Physics should be an adventure.

  • Herr Einstein, enough!

  • Fail him if you must.

  • I am no longer concerned for his future.

  • - Miza! - Hello, Papa.

  • I am so sorry, Papa. I failed you.

  • Subtitle sync and corrections by awaqeded for www.addic7ed.com.

  • ♪ ♪

  • ♪ ♪

  • (mechanical humming)

  • (humming stops, resumes)

  • (whispering): Oh, my God.

  • - (click) - (humming stops)

  • Oh, my God.

  • Hold still there,

  • - please. - (humming resumes)

  • (humming stops)

  • WOMAN: I don't... understand.

  • MAN: It's a photograph, Anna,

  • of the bones beneath your skin.

  • Dear God, Wilhelm.

  • I have seen

  • my own death.

  • It is wonderful, isn't it?

  • Wilhelm...

  • you are going to be famous.

  • ♪ ♪

  • KATHARINA: I still don't understand, Philipp.

  • The invention is yours, is it not?

  • The modification to the cathode ray tube he used

  • were my innovation, yes.

  • This imposter, what's his name?

  • - Rontgen. - Well, if I read this article correctly,

  • this Rontgen fellow merely noticed something

  • using your invention.

  • He made an observation, yes.

  • An observation.

  • There. Taste your eggs.

  • Make an observation about them.

  • Too salty, perhaps?

  • Does that mean you cooked the damn things?

  • - No. - Of course not.

  • Because to make such a claim would be absurd.

  • He's snatched the credit

  • you justly deserve.

  • (snaps newspaper)

  • (exhales): How could I have missed it?

  • You'll make it right, my love.

  • I believe in you.

  • Your brilliance will be recognized.

  • EINSTEIN: I don't care about awards,

  • Michele, I care about science,

  • about understanding the world around me.

  • I'm not interested in shiny medals.

  • This is not just any award... it's called the Nobel Prize.

  • Says here it is to be awarded annually, and beyond notoriety

  • it comes with a great deal of money.

  • - Money? - Just think...

  • wealth and fame for being a physicist.

  • You are brilliant, Albert, you could win one.

  • Right now I'd trade ten of these Nobel Prizes

  • for a teaching job.

  • ♪ ♪

  • Steady.

  • I've clearly miscalculated the salary

  • - of an assistant professor. - Don't be thick.

  • I won it in a bet with the head of my department.

  • This sultry beast... 'tis only mine till sundown.

  • - BESSO: What was the bet? - I'm sure it's a riveting yarn,

  • and I'm happy to suffer through the whole damn thing

  • once we're actually on the road to Basel.

  • My first interview,

  • and I'm going to be late... perfect.

  • Like a virginal maiden, Albert, this machine needs

  • to be delicately wooed to a state of agitation.

  • If Marcel's history with the ladies is any predictor,

  • we'll be on the road by next Tuesday.

  • Albert, you will sweat

  • through that suit if you don't calm down.

  • Michele, I have sent my paper

  • to every halfway decent university in Europe,

  • and I've been rejected everywhere.

  • This is the first bite of the apple I've had.

  • Mileva's getting impatient.

  • Mileva? She's in Serbia... what does she have...?

  • - (engine starts) - Ah!

  • An historic day... Marcel Grossmann

  • finally gets something all hot and bothered.

  • Ah...

  • (exhales)

  • MAN: The capillary effect has been

  • well studied, Herr Einstein.

  • Your disquisition hardly adds

  • to the body of knowledge.

  • To say nothing of your verbose style.

  • The reading experience is undeniably taxing.

  • I would be remiss

  • to challenge your opinions, Herr Professor.

  • Science is not about opinions.

  • What I mean to say, Herr Professor, is...

  • you make many observations I hadn't considered,

  • much to my regret.

  • (chuckles softly)

  • Your record does you credit, I must admit.

  • And despite a large field

  • of gifted applicants, it seems that you're somehow

  • the most qualified candidate we've yet met.

  • I shall send your name

  • up to the committee for approval.

  • Thank you.

  • Thank... thank you.

  • MILEVA: Albert hasn't abandoned me, Papa.

  • Then where is he?

  • Tell me that.

  • Getting settled.

  • I need a home to return to once I've had the baby.

  • And then what?

  • Miza. Then what?

  • You change diapers all day long?

  • Wipe noses?

  • Sing lullabies?

  • No. I will earn my degree, Papa.

  • - I swear it. - For years,

  • I taught you never to rely on a man for anything.

  • Do I really need to explain the situation to you, Papa?

  • I just don't want you to punish yourself

  • for the rest of your life.

  • Not for making a mistake one night.

  • It wasn't a mistake.

  • And it certainly wasn't one night.

  • You were in Zurich... the Swiss are experts

  • at taking care of unfortunate circumstances.

  • I would never do such a thing!

  • I want to have Albert's child.

  • (shudders) I want more for you.

  • If you believe in me,

  • Papa, at least give Albert a chance.

  • ♪ ♪

  • (door opens)

  • (door slams)

  • (hinges squeak)

  • (door opens)

  • (door creaks)

  • Herr Einstein.

  • Good evening, Frau Schnellham.

  • You're quite the kitty, sneaking all about.

  • Just testing your impeccable hearing.

  • Still top-notch.

  • Do you have the rent or not?

  • Not.

  • You know your way out, then,

  • - kitty. - I've secured a position.

  • I'm merely awaiting

  • a final letter of approval.

  • Then it isn't secured, is it?

  • Well, perhaps there's word today.

  • I-I would check the post, but...

  • seeing as you've confiscated

  • my mail key...

  • Please, Frau Schnellham.

  • (sighs)

  • Many prominent academics and leading thinkers in the field

  • are talking favorably of my work.

  • (opening envelope)

  • Well?

  • EINSTEIN: I was given the impression

  • that the job was mine but for a formality.

  • I've made many inquiries in search of answers,

  • but I've been met with silence.

  • So you have come for help, then.

  • Just... a small favor,

  • Herr Professor, a letter of recommendation,

  • perhaps.

  • Perhaps, uh, like,

  • uh, this one.

  • (clears throat)

  • "Esteemed Herr Weber, forgive my impudence

  • "in writing you directly,

  • "but I beg you to intercede on behalf of my poor Albert.

  • As a concerned father..."

  • My father?

  • Herr Professor, I...

  • I had no idea.

  • I would... I would never ask my father

  • to intercede on my behalf.

  • Frankly, I'm mortified.

  • As you should be.

  • Like any other recent graduate, I am only asking

  • that you put in a word with potential employers.

  • Oh, but I have.

  • Many universities have sought my counsel

  • on your intellect and your character.

  • But in good conscience

  • I have not and I cannot...

  • recommend your character.

  • You gave me an unfavorable recommendation?

  • Several, in fact.

  • But that's sabotage.

  • You openly challenged my authority.

  • You publicly disrespected me.

  • How am I to justify sticking my head above the grass for you

  • when there are so many qualified alumni

  • who have actually earned my respect?

  • But this is my reputation we're talking about.

  • And mine, too!

  • If I recommend someone and they fail to live up

  • to my endorsement, how do I look?

  • But you don't understand, sir.

  • I have... I have obligations.

  • (chuckles) Obligations.

  • You are what? 22?

  • An unknown, unattached, healthy young man.

  • What obligations could you possibly have?

  • EINSTEIN: My name is ruined! All because I couldn't keep

  • my stupid mouth shut in Weber's class.

  • I already wrote to Mileva to tell her I got the job.

  • Mileva? What has she got to do with this?

  • Put in a good word for me, Marcel, in your department.

  • I am a flea on the smelly ass of academia.

  • No one cares what I have to say.

  • But there is a position I know of.

  • Decent wage, steady hours.

  • What is it?

  • It's in Bern at the patent office.

  • Um, clerical position, but very interesting work.

  • You could employ some of your engineering knowledge.

  • I'm a scientist, Marcel!

  • I'm better than a clerkship.

  • - You need money. - I need a thought,

  • a paper that can show people what I can do; I need time.

  • No, you need a job.

  • Why not ask your father

  • could he set you up in the factory in Milan?

  • Because he humiliated me.

  • I'm done with him, after the letter to Weber.

  • Did it ever occur to you that perhaps your father