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  • Hey everyone. Dan here from DeepEnglish.com.

  • This is the normal speed lesson for this week's listening fluency listening lesson.

  • At the end of this lesson, I'm going to be explaining some of the vocabulary.

  • As always, you can download these lessons in three speeds,

  • a slow speed, a normal speed, and a fast speed at DeepEnglish.com.

  • Okay, click subscribe to get these lessons every week, and let's listen.

  • Okay, today we heard three stories.

  • Some of these stories may be new to you.

  • All three of them are related to common English expressions we use today

  • but are hundreds of years old.

  • If this is the first time to hear some of these stories, you're not alone.

  • Many native English speakers don't even know these stories

  • but use these expressions frequently.

  • Okay, let's look at two of them: 'fall on deaf ears' and 'turn a blind eye'.

  • These two are related.

  • They both describe situations where something is being ignored.

  • But the way you use them is a little bit different.

  • Let's look at the first one.

  • The first one, 'fall on deaf ears'.

  • A couple examples might be if, imagine a woman wants some time off work.

  • So she asks her boss, "Can I have some extra time off work?

  • My family is sick and I need to take care of them."

  • And the boss says, "No," and ignores that request.

  • Her request falls on deaf ears.

  • Her explanation of why she needs time off falls on deaf ears.

  • Another example might be a man who suggests to his boss

  • that the company needs to improve their customer service

  • and the boss ignores this suggestion.

  • His suggestion to improve the customer service falls on deaf ears.

  • So that's 'falls on deaf ears'.

  • Let's look at the other one, 'to turn a blind eye'.

  • In the story we heard Admiral Nelson was ordered by his superior to run from a fight.

  • And literally, he turned a blind eye.

  • He put the telescope to his blind eye and he said, "I see no signal."

  • So he ignored the request to run from the fight,

  • but the important point is he pretended not to see it.

  • So that's the main difference with 'turn a blind eye'.

  • It's not just to ignore, but it's also to pretend not to see.

  • So let's look at a couple more examples.

  • Another example might be a company president's son works for the company.

  • And the president's son is making many mistakes at work,

  • but the manager ignores these mistakes.

  • He turns a blind eye to the president's son's mistakes

  • because he knows one day, the son will become the president.

  • He turns a blind eye. He ignores his mistakes.

  • Another example might be a woman who owns a fruit store

  • and she sees a homeless man stealing some fruit.

  • And she turns a blind eye to his stealing because she knows he's hungry.

  • She ignores him stealing. She turns a blind eye.

  • And the third expression we used was 'to throw the baby out with the bathwater'.

  • So to 'throw the baby out with the bathwater' means

  • to throw away the good things with the bad things.

  • An example of that might be if you had a plan

  • and you decided that that plan was no good

  • and you threw that plan out and you said, "I need to start over."

  • But maybe there are some good points in the plan that you should keep.

  • So for example, maybe you're planning a trip to Europe.

  • And you say,"I want to visit France and Spain and Germany in three weeks.

  • I want to spend one week in each country."

  • Now, you might think, "Hmm. One week in each country. Maybe that's not a good idea.

  • Maybe that's not enough time to really get to know the country,

  • get to know the culture.

  • You know, this plan is no good. I should not take this trip."

  • Now, somebody might say, "Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait.

  • Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater.

  • Maybe you can save parts of this plan.

  • Maybe you can go to France and Germany, and spend 10 days each.

  • Spend more time in each and leave Spain for another trip."

  • So don't throw the baby out with the bathwater.

  • Maybe parts of your plan are good and you don't need to start over.

  • Okay, so that's the three expressions.

  • 'Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater',

  • 'turn a blind eye',

  • and 'fall on deaf ears'.

  • So try using one of these expressions in the comments

  • and I'll get back to you and let you know if you're using it correctly.

  • Okay, I hope you enjoyed these lessons

  • and click subscribe to get notified of these lessons every week.

  • Okay, bye-bye.

Hey everyone. Dan here from DeepEnglish.com.

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A2 US blind deaf eye plan throw wait wait

Deep English - Idioms (Normal Speed)

  • 1981 175
    Samuel posted on 2018/05/31
Video vocabulary