Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hey guys this week we are focusing on watercolor this is going to be a

  • two-part tutorial this week we'll start with all the supplies that you need to

  • be successful with watercolor painting and then a few weeks from now I'm going

  • to produce a techniques watercolor video so look out for that one and make sure

  • you watch until the end of today's tutorial because there is a super

  • giveaway this is an awesome prize pack especially if you're a watercolor artist

  • or getting started in watercolor so watch to the end of the video for

  • that

  • Guys I just want to take a sec to say thank you to everyone who's supporting

  • me on patreon you guys are awesome and this week because we're doing watercolor

  • supplies I've released a whole pack of watercolor clipart it's hand painted by

  • me flowers leaves everything you need to create beautiful watercolor inspired

  • blog headers landing pages you can use this for your social media graphics so

  • go get that now it's all available for a $2 donation on my patreon site so I'm

  • going to start today's video with what I think is the most important of

  • watercolor painting supplies and that is watercolor paper now even if you're

  • painting with watercolor paints that you made out of kool-aid or coffee or I

  • don't know whatever you still want good quality watercolor paper because part of

  • the painting process is really all about how the paint absorbs into that paper

  • and as we all know thin paper like computer paper buckles when it gets wet

  • and that's what you really don't want so we're gonna have a long talk of a good

  • watercolor paper now I just received these beautiful

  • pads of watercolor paper from Canson there are a hundred percent cotton and

  • we'll talk about what that means and I have one to give away as part of our

  • prize pack for today so make sure you watch till the end of today's tutorial

  • for the giveaway okay so there's a lot of info out there about paper but it

  • doesn't need to be confusing and everything you need to know about the

  • paper that you're buying is contained right here on the front cover so we're

  • gonna sort of go through this label and demystify it so first of all what's easy

  • okay twelve sheets we know what that means we've got twelve pieces of paper

  • this one is ten by fourteen inches I do like to typically by larger pads of

  • paper because if it's ten by fourteen or

  • nine by twelve I can still cut it in half and get two useable sheets they're

  • four different pieces of works that's why I usually buy large and next piece

  • of information it says a hundred percent cotton and that means that this paper is

  • artist quality so paper that is pH neutral acid-free and 100 percent cotton

  • it's not going to deteriorate or yellow over time the way an old newspaper does

  • and that's important if you're selling your work so you know if you're just

  • painting and scanning it into the computer and making clipart or you're

  • just practicing you can purchase student quality paper that does contain acid and

  • you don't need to worry about it and you can save the money but if you're making

  • work that you want to hold on to that you want to pass down that you want to

  • sell even if you're producing prints so you're printing your work out onto

  • watercolor paper and you need to make sure that it's a hundred percent cotton

  • and so that time won't cause any trouble next piece of info 300 grams per meter

  • squared or a hundred and forty pound we have the weight of the paper and that

  • will always be listed on the front and GSM means gram per meter squared and

  • pounds means pounds per ream of paper so 140 pound is a pretty typical weight and

  • it's the one that I paint with often typically you're gonna see these four

  • weights ninety pounds or 190 GSM that's a really thin it's good for making

  • prints 140 pounds is a good weight I think it's recommended that you do

  • still stretch 140 pound paper and I have a video all about that that I'll link in

  • the description next would be 260 pound most people

  • would say at that point it's not as necessary to stretch your paper now it's

  • gonna cost you more but it's sort of nice you can skip that step and then 300

  • pound being typically the most commercially produced or machine

  • produced heaviest paper and it's very thick and dense I use 140 pound because

  • it's so available being one of the machine produced weights and being on

  • the lighter and it's gonna be a good price point and since I'm not doing

  • landscapes or something where I'm putting tons of color on there and doing

  • lots of washes I think I think I can get away without stretching it but I guess

  • that's a personal choice we'll call it okay and then last thing probably the

  • most important is this word right in the middle and that is rough and there are

  • three types of watercolor paper there's rough paper cold pressed and hot pressed

  • and those words refer to the type of surface that you're going to be painting

  • on now rough paper such as this has a prominent tooth and a textured surface

  • when you paint on it you're going to sort of get a grainy effect and you'll

  • get a nice pooling of the paint rough paper is good for wet on wet and it's

  • also good for building up washes of color it can absorb a lot of paint and

  • it's nice for dry brushing because of that texture if you want to do clouds or

  • trees you can dry brush and you can pick up that texture and use it to your

  • advantage one sort of drawback I guess would be that it can be hard to control

  • those small delicate brush strokes because the surface is so toothy so just

  • something to think about next we have hot pressed paper and hot

  • pressed is at the other end of the spectrum it has a fine grain and a

  • smooth surface it's not very good for building up multiple washes and colors

  • because very little pigment gets beyond the surface of the paper the paper sort

  • of gets overloaded and that has to do with how much pressure is applied in the

  • making of the paper and how close the cotton fibers are so you can see here on

  • this hot pressed paper the painting is a little bit flat the paint doesn't have

  • anywhere to go but on a rough paper the paint and water can seep down in between

  • those cotton fibers which are farther apart so it's better for ink pen and ink

  • for gouache and I don't use it very often because it can be hard to build up

  • nice amounts of color and you certainly don't get that beautiful watercolor

  • texture that you desire now the one positive here is that it's really nice

  • for scanning into a computer so if you're doing a lot of watercolor that

  • you want to use online say for your blog header using a hot pressed paper means

  • that you're not picking up all that shadowy texture in your scanner when you

  • go to use this as a graphic so that's something to think about but then again

  • you don't get the beautiful watercolor look so this one I'd consider it much

  • much better for pen and ink okay and then in the middle we have our

  • Goldilocks paper and that is cold pressed and it

  • is in between rough and hot pressed so you get a nice textured paper that's not

  • overly rough so it's good for doing small detail but it's also good for

  • doing washes and building up color it's the choice of many artists because it is

  • the best of both worlds and it's truly my favorite paper and the one that

  • you'll see me use over and over again on the channel the last thing you want to

  • consider when it comes to paper is do you want to stretch your paper it's

  • always a good idea to do so I'm a very lazy artist and I rarely do that but

  • there is one product that can help with that and that is a watercolor paper

  • block it's a really cool product and I have a couple here from Canson all the

  • sheets are stuck together to form a block and this is good for plein air

  • painting or when you're outdoors or on the go you can do your painting and then

  • you take a little exacto knife once it's dry and then you carefully cut out or

  • cut off that top sheet and peel it off and this will keep your your paper

  • fairly stretched while you're painting okay next we're going to talk about

  • watercolor paints now there's a lot of wonderful things about watercolors

  • they're fun to use they're non-toxic they're easy cleanup and of course they

  • mix with water which makes them beautifully translucent and very fluid

  • and that fluidity well and same with the translucency actually those two

  • attributes can make watercolor your most hated medium and for a long time I

  • absolutely hated watercolor first of all that translucent nature it makes it

  • really hard to cover up a mistake and the fluidity it means that, that paint is

  • liable to get away from you and you're always not quite in control of the paint

  • but as I get older that's what I've really come to love about watercolor is

  • that, that fluidity I have to enjoy the process and it's not

  • about always getting it right so now that's actually one of my

  • favorite things about this medium now there are three different types of

  • watercolor paints there are water colored tubes pans or disks and liquid

  • watercolors and there's no one type that's better than another all of them

  • can be purchased in artist quality or student quality or craft quality but

  • it's really just about choosing the one that's right for you

  • maybe you really love discs but then you prefer tubes when you're doing

  • large-scale pieces you know so all of them I think are quite equal you simply

  • need to decide which type is best for you and then you need to decide which

  • quality you're willing to pay for if you're selling your work go with artist

  • quality if you're practicing stick to student quality to save money and when

  • you're talking about artist quality you're really talking about the quality

  • of the pigment so watercolors are made up of finely ground pigment and that

  • pigment is what color's the paint and then there's other ingredients in there

  • and we're not going to get too detailed but there's you know something to bind

  • the paint there's something to moisturize it so it doesn't get dry and

  • gross and there might be something to help facilitate the flow of the paint

  • but it's really all about the quality of that pigment and a good quality pigment

  • means that the paint will have a nice vibrancy of color my trueness of color

  • and also a longevity of color so you want when you're buying artists paint

  • and you're spending that extra money for those paints to last on the page and

  • stay true over the years of course if you're just practicing and you're

  • getting to know this medium you're not gonna want to spend the money on artist

  • quality paint so hunt around for something that is a good price and has a

  • good pigment as well say something like this praying watercolor set part of the

  • problem you're gonna have is just simply that the colors are so washed out you're

  • not going to be able to get a real vibrancy of color but it doesn't mean

  • you can't make something nice them and I use this prank set to do a

  • wreath and it's one of my most popular videos and I will link that in the

  • description below as well and if you're a fan of the channel you know that

  • probably you can guess my favorite type and that is the pans or the discs the

  • reason I like them is because I find them really easy to get started with you

  • can sort of jump right in when you're painting with discs a lot of them come

  • with a palette in the lid the Sakura set does and I just mines in the kitchen in

  • the sink or something but that makes it really easy you can just get your water

  • and start mixing tubes are really nice because they you can mix up large

  • quantities of a color so if you're trying to mix a certain shade of blue

  • that doesn't come in your set it could be a hard to mix up enough of that blue

  • to do a whole 20 by 30 piece say you're trying to do a sky wash but when you're

  • working with a tube that's gonna be much easier isn't it because you can mix up a

  • large amount and then the nice thing about the liquid colors is that they are

  • very very vibrant so you can get an extremely vibrant color and they're

  • actually dye based so they will stain the page and they're wonderful for doing

  • illustration work especially okay and when it comes to paint brushes

  • specifically for water color again this is a big subject I could probably do a

  • whole video just on this but I just want to give you enough information that you

  • can make informed choices and you're not just sort of bogged down with info so

  • what should a brush do well a good brush a successful paint brush should hold a

  • good amount of paint and water sort of in its belly

  • so above the tip you want to have paint in your brush a good brush should have a

  • nice delicate fine point whether it's around or flat it should have a nice

  • fine tip and finally a good brush will allow your paint to flow onto the page

  • in an easy smooth fluid motion so that's sort of what you're wanting out of your

  • brush and then brushes if there's three things you're going to think about when

  • you're shopping for a brush and the first is the type so the type of hair

  • the size and the shape now when it comes to different types of brush bristle hair

  • there are animal hairs so I think gosh okay it's pig and ox and squirrel are

  • quite common and and goat so you'll see a lot of those and I'm pretty sure this

  • is the hog hair brush the the light-colored ones

  • I'm not into using animal brushes very often I just find they're not for me and

  • I know a lot of people also prefer you know a man-made / animal made and I

  • totally get that as well so I'm not usually using these kind of brushes

  • I prefer synthetic bristles and synthetic bristles are usually made from

  • nylon or polyester and well some of the typical animal hair brushes like hog

  • hair brushes will be really cheap there are very expensive sought-after animal

  • brushes that are much more expensive and the synthetic brushes are meant to mimic

  • those really high quality ones so for my purposes I really like the nylon

  • bristles and so once you've chosen what type of bristle you're going to go for

  • it you need to think about the size of the brush and this often just comes down

  • to well what size is your project so if you're doing a lot of 4 by 6

  • cards you're going to be using you know fairly small brushes and these are sort

  • of the brushes that I employ constantly this is a number 10 and a 12 so I'm

  • using these all the time there so I'm not too big and not too small to compare

  • this is I think the one in the three and then this would be more like a twenty

  • and this is good for larger work so these are my go-to brushes nylon

  • bristles everything from sort of 1 up to 20 although you don't need them all just

  • you know a selection and then the last thing you're gonna think about is the

  • shape and there are many different brush shapes and there are many different ways

  • to use each shape and you know the why you would use a flat brush here or

  • versus a round brush we're not going to get into any of that I'm

  • basically gonna say that for most of what I do I like a round brush and it's

  • important to have a round brush with a nice fine tip so that comes to a nice

  • fine point or a nice round brush with a fine point will hold lots of paint in

  • its belly and then you'll be able to get these beautiful fine

  • delicate lines as you paint because it has the brush has a good tip so that is

  • what I'm going to say about brushes think about the size that you need

  • what kind of bristle I like nylon or synthetic and the shape and I think a

  • lot of watercolor artists would agree with me on this if you just get a

  • selection of round brushes with a good fine tip it's gonna be a really good

  • start and of course all of the supplies that we've used in today's tutorial are

  • linked in the description below so check the video description for the Amazon

  • links to all of these products and more of my favorites thanks for watching

  • today guys I hope you'll check out some of the other watercolour tutorials and

  • look out in a couple weeks for the watercolor techniques video but right

  • now you should go enter the giveaway because this is a super prize pack there

  • is some gorgeous thick 140 pound water colored paper from Canson as well as a

  • watercolor field set the 30 pan from Sakura complete with a palette and a

  • water brush so check the video description for a link that will let you

  • into the giveaway and from there there's tons of different ways to enter so we

  • hope that it'll be fair for everybody tons of ways to enter this giveaway and

  • international entries are welcome thanks for watching and I'll see you next week

Hey guys this week we are focusing on watercolor this is going to be a

Subtitles and vocabulary

B1 INT US watercolor paper brush paint quality painting

Essential Watercolor For Beginners: SUPPLIES

  • 432 8
    April Lu   posted on 2018/05/20
Video vocabulary