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  • (peaceful music)

  • Hello, everyone, and welcome back to English with Lucy.

  • You guys have requested it.

  • I've had so many requests for another slang,

  • British slang video, so I thought I'd cover

  • British slang verbs and also

  • some slang phrasal verbs as well.

  • Really, really useful.

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  • Let's get started.

  • Or should I say let's crack on.

  • We'll talk about that one in a minute.

  • So, lots of lovely slang, predominantly British,

  • although you will find some in Australia, for example,

  • and maybe the United States,

  • but most of them are more used in the UK.

  • But in the UK, you will definitely need to understand

  • these words if you're going to integrate with natives.

  • I'm also going to chuck in, include,

  • lots of extra bonus British slang words.

  • Oh my God, that's hard to say.

  • And I will explain them as I go along.

  • The first one is 'to fancy',

  • and I have mentioned this one before,

  • but it's so important that I'm going to mention it again.

  • You need to know this verb.

  • You need to know it, we use it all the time.

  • It has two meanings,

  • it can mean to be romantically interested in somebody,

  • so an example could be, I fancied Will for ages

  • and I was gobsmacked when I found out that he fancied me too.

  • 'Gobsmacked' means shocked, speechless.

  • Now, the other way that we use this verb

  • is to express that we want or we feel like something.

  • I could say, I really fancy fish and chips tonight.

  • And that means I really feel like fish and chips.

  • I want fish and chips.

  • Or in a question, do you fancy going to the pub?

  • Do you want to go to the pub?

  • Do you feel like going to the pub?

  • Now, note I said, do you want to go,

  • but do you fancy going?

  • Do you feel like going?

  • So, remember that if you use it in an exam.

  • Right, the next one, number two is a phrasal verb.

  • It is to dob somebody in.

  • To dob somebody in.

  • This means to report a person to somebody of authority for a wrongdoing.

  • So, if somebody's done something wrong,

  • you inform someone in a position of authority.

  • For example, I can't believe Ellie dobbed me in

  • to the teacher for skipping class yesterday.

  • She dobbed me in.

  • She informed the teacher,

  • who is in a position of authority, over me.

  • She told on me.

  • She dobbed me in.

  • I remember at school, if somebody was being mean,

  • I'd say, I'm gonna dob you in,

  • which means I'm going to tell the teacher.

  • (chuckles)

  • Right, the next one, number three, another phrasal verb.

  • This one is to chat somebody up.

  • To chat somebody up.

  • Now, this can mean two things in British English.

  • The first one is the more common use

  • and the second one is slightly less common,

  • it's kind of used in a more sarcastic way.

  • The first meaning is to talk to somebody

  • in a flirtatious way.

  • To talk to somebody flirtatiously.

  • So, if somebody's paying me lots and lots of compliments,

  • I might say, are you chatting me up?

  • Are you flirting with me?

  • I think in America you might say to hit on.

  • Are you hitting on me?

  • Are you chatting me up?

  • The other meaning is to talk to somebody persuasively,

  • normally with ulterior motives.

  • For example, say a bouncer wouldn't let us into a club,

  • I'll say, I'll see if I can chat her up.

  • It doesn't mean I'm going to flirt with her.

  • It means I'm going to try and be really, really nice to her

  • to try and persuade her to let us in.

  • The next one, to be up for something.

  • We use this all the time.

  • Are you up for it?

  • I'm up for it.

  • She's up for it.

  • The meaning is very simple.

  • It means to want to do something.

  • So, if I am up for going out, I want to go out,

  • I feel like going out.

  • So, if I say, we're going ice skating tonight

  • if you're up for it,

  • it means we're going ice skating tonight

  • if you want to come too.

  • It's very, very informal.

  • Next, another one we use all the time.

  • I use it so frequently,

  • and when I talk to non-native speakers,

  • I try and carefully select my verbs

  • so that I avoid using slangs

  • so that they can understand me better,

  • but pop is the one that I struggle with

  • because I just use it all the time.

  • And pop, the meaning is very simple.

  • Once you understand it, you will be fine.

  • It means to go somewhere usually for a short period of time

  • and often without notice.

  • So, without notice is you haven't advised

  • the place or the people that you're going to go there,

  • you're going to visit.

  • We often use it with a preposition.

  • I'm just popping out.

  • I'm just going outside for a short period of time.

  • Or I'm just gonna pop to the shops.

  • Do you want anything?

  • I'm just going to go to the shops.

  • Do you need anything?

  • Or if I say, do you mind if I pop in for a minute?

  • It means do you mind if I quickly visit your house for a second?

  • So it's normally something spontaneous, unplanned,

  • short period of time, but it basically just means go.

  • Number six, to go on about.

  • This means to talk continuously and to talk too much.

  • It's teetering, it's only just on the negative side.

  • So, if I say, ugh, what's she going on about again,

  • it means what's she talking about continuously and too much again?

  • But sometimes it's used in quite an affectionate way.

  • What are you going on about?

  • What's he going on about?

  • But we sometimes forget the going bit,

  • so what are you on about?

  • What's he on about?

  • Be prepared to hear people say on about

  • instead of to go on about.

  • Number seven, another phrasal verb, very important one.

  • Can also just be a verb on its own, it is to faff around,

  • or you can shorten it to faff, just to faff.

  • It's not a phrasal verb in this case.

  • It's got two meanings, both are quite similar.

  • The first meaning, the most common one

  • is to spend time doing unimportant things

  • and avoid what you really should be doing.

  • A little bit like to procrastinate

  • but with more emphasis on doing the unimportant things.

  • What have you been doing?

  • Have you just been faffing around?

  • I'm trying to say what have you been doing

  • have you been avoiding all the important tasks and

  • just doing meaningless tasks?

  • The other meaning is to behave in a silly way,

  • so if someone's being a little bit stupid

  • joking around too much I might say stop

  • faffing around, stop messing around it could also mean.

  • Faff on its own, stop faffing, oh I'm just faffing.

  • We don't necessarily have to include that around there.

  • Number eight, a verb on its own,

  • to scoff, to scoff,

  • and this in British English slang means to eat something quickly and greedily.

  • So if I see someone eating their lunch really really quickly

  • I might say you scoff that,

  • you ate that quickly and greedily.

  • It's very informal, it's quite friendly,

  • it's not necessarily negative if you use it in the right way.

  • So I might say I scoffed my dinner

  • and I went up for seconds.

  • I ate my dinner really quickly and greedily,

  • and to go up for seconds means

  • to return to the food with your plate

  • to get a second helping.

  • Number nine, another phrasal verb,

  • this one is to crack on with something or someone

  • because there is a new use for this phrasal verb.

  • The first one is to proceed or to progress quickly.

  • You know at the beginning of my lessons

  • I say right let's get started with the lesson.

  • I could say let's crack on with the lesson,

  • let's get going, let's proceed quickly

  • and progress quickly too.

  • Another newer meaning for this phrasal verb is

  • to flirt with somebody.

  • So if I say I saw James cracking on with Holly,

  • it means I saw James at least attempting

  • to flirt with Holly.

  • I guess you could think that

  • it's somebody trying to progress with

  • their relationship with a specific person

  • but please remember that that one

  • is very informal and it's relatively new.

  • The last one number 10 is to skive.

  • It's a verb on its own,

  • but you can add the preposition off

  • and say to skive off.

  • It means the same thing.

  • The definition is to avoid work, school,

  • or a particular duty by leaving early

  • or by just not going, staying away.

  • I might say I'm going to skive off this last lesson

  • because the teacher just reads off the slides.

  • If they're just reading off the sides,

  • it means they're just reading the words on the presentation,

  • they're not adding anything extra.

  • It was my pet hate.

  • It was something that particularly annoyed me at school and at university.

  • Why just read me the presentation

  • if I can read it myself at home.

  • Let's not go into too much detail.

  • Or you could say, oh I think Tom skived off work yesterday

  • because he called in sick.

  • He said he was ill on the telephone

  • and then I saw him in the shopping centre.

  • Naughty.

  • Have you ever skived off work?

  • Comment below if you have.

  • Right, so those are the 10 British slang

  • phrasal verbs and verbs.

  • Why is that so hard to say?

  • Now I'm gonna have a quick chat to you

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