Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hello everybody!

  • I get a lot of questions on my main channel about Japan

  • and Japanese and lots of different things

  • and on Tumblr and stuff like that.

  • But the thing is that only one person

  • gets to see that response. Or maybe like 10.

  • So I thought I would just do a short series of videos

  • on this channel answering your questions about Japan.

  • So that means leave your question below

  • and the most popular questions I'll make a video about.

  • So today's video is one of my most frequently asked questions,

  • which is, how did you learn Japanese.

  • And it's going to get a little bit long, so hang in there!

  • First of all, my Japanese is not perfect.

  • It is functional, but it isn't perfect.

  • It isn't super amazing, and I'm still learning, so ... yeah!

  • Secondly, I self-studied Japanese.

  • ... so I studied by myself

  • and I don't think that's the most efficient way to study a language, necessarily,

  • it depends on how you learn

  • but I definitely think that being in a classroom situation

  • with that kind of pressure cooker thing

  • where you have to memorise things for tests

  • and you have to speak in class and stuff

  • really helps when you're learning a language.

  • So look up your local language classes

  • and if there aren't any, stick with me

  • because I'll tell you how I self-studied Japanese.

  • First thing you've got to do is learn kana, hiragana and katakana.

  • Just get down and dirty and learn those beasts quickly

  • because you need to!

  • I once knew someone who had lived in Japan for a year

  • and still hadn't finished learning katakana

  • and that's just - no! You only need a week to learn them, trust me!

  • You could learn them in a day actually. It's rote memorisation.

  • Memorise it, learn how to write it - you're done!

  • OK. I know that sounded a little bit crazy but I'm serious.

  • Learn hiragana and katakana.

  • Now we're going to go on to my favourite Japanese textbook.

  • The best textbook for learning Japanese IMHO

  • It is slightly academically slanted

  • It's very very structured, which I really like

  • but if you learn a different way from me, you might not like it so much ... and it is

  • Genki. So this is the second one, the first one is red.

  • You can find it on Amazon and I'll put a link below.

  • You can buy it with a workbook and a CD.

  • I've never really used the CD but I think that would be really beneficial

  • if you're learning by yourself.

  • Now this book I entirely self-studied.

  • and it has amazing structure, like I just said.

  • You get a list of vocabulary and you have to memorise it.

  • because all the chapters integrate the vocabulary as you go on

  • so it's a great way to motivate you to actually memorise

  • I'm dropping things left, right and centre here!

  • But anyway, it has a vocabulary section

  • it has grammar, pages of grammar, explains it really well in English

  • and then - more stuff I used to practise -

  • and then it has tons of practice,

  • speaking challenges

  • and for each lesson, at the back there is a list of kanji.

  • Even if you don't have a teacher in a class

  • or a friend to study with or a language exchange partner

  • I think you can learn so much from this textbook alone.

  • Obviously, start with the red one if you're a beginner.

  • and then move on to Genki II if you enjoy the red one.

  • It can get a little bit pricey overseas

  • but if you have a friend who's going to Japan

  • or a friend in Japan, it's only 3000 Yen,

  • which is actually quite cheap, I think, for this kind of book.

  • I think I paid 90 dollars for it in New Zealand.

  • So, yay! Not yay for that price, but yeah.

  • The only downside is - you don't have a teacher to check your answers

  • You really have to self-check, and you can accidentally learn things wrong.

  • There's also "Minna no Nihongo", which is another series of beginner textbooks

  • and advanced and intermediate textbooks, I think.

  • I've never really used it but tons of universities use it, I think.

  • So there's that, if you don't like style of the Genki textbook.

  • OK, my recommendations if you've finished Genki II

  • It's so much harder to find solid study books

  • so what I did when I finished Genki II

  • was I went on to these books.

  • I did sankyu (N3) first and then I got the nikyu (N2) ones

  • after I'd memorised everything in the sankyu ones

  • but there's a bit of overlap

  • so just choose which one looks good for your level

  • And these are really good for reinforcing stuff like kanji

  • It helped me with my kanji and reinforcing grammar.

  • It has grammar, reading, kanji and also vocabulary.

  • These are pretty good. I'll put a link down below.

  • The drill is really noisy, sorry about that.

  • But I have to keep going.

  • So Japanese books, manga, magazines,

  • English books in Japanese, Japanese movies

  • - stuff like that are all great.

  • Supplement your learning ... that's so fricking loud!

  • OK, I'm back. It was noisy. I came back.

  • So the last step is immersion, which you can achieve by coming to Japan

  • or you can do it by surrounding yourself with Japanese things

  • Japanese music, Japanese cartoons, Japanese dramas,

  • Japanese movies, Japanese people and Japanese stuff.

  • And you can change your computer to Japanese

  • and you can speak to yourself in Japanese

  • and you can record a vlog in Japanese.

  • In fact if you want to try that, do your "jikoshoukai" (self-introduction)

  • and post it as a video response to this video

  • and we can all be Japanese-y. No ...

  • And the last thing is using the Internet as a learning tool

  • I put this last for a reason

  • because even though you can learn some pretty cool Japanese from the Internet

  • and you can definitely immerse yourself in Japanese

  • and practise your Japanese on the Internet

  • it is definitely not the only thing you should be doing.

  • It's an additional thing you can do to supplement your learning.

  • I've heard of people Skyping with Japanese people,

  • meeting on Twitter,

  • and there are loads of Japanese people who want to learn English

  • so you can do a language exchange.

  • There's a website called Lang-8 where people can correct your journal entries.

  • YouTube has tons of Japanese-y videos. Tons!

  • You could probably spend hours and hours and days.

  • It would take you years to watch them all.

  • Just be careful, because I know, and you know

  • how addictive the Internet is.

  • It will trick you into thinking you're studying

  • when really you're not.

  • Because you might be able to pick up a few things from a YouTube video or a website

  • but it's probably not as much as you would pick up

  • if you just sat down for 10 minutes a day and studied.

  • And that's the last point. I made three last points, sorry!

  • The last point is just a little bit a day, and don't feel discouraged.

  • What I used to do was study in my lunchbreaks

  • so I would carry around my textbooks

  • and any chance I had to study, I would use it.

  • It really helped me, so maybe that will help you.

  • Unless you don't work.

  • So leave your [sound of metal being dropped] Yeah.

  • So you guys, in the comments section, please leave your suggestions

  • and your language learning tips.

  • And also leave your requests

  • and thumb up the ones you like the sound of

  • and I will probably do them for you. Yay!

  • Byeeeee! Wow, it went really blurry. Goodbye.

  • And yeah! I just look like Boxxy.

Hello everybody!

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

A2 AU japanese learning studied textbook language grammar

How I Learned Japanese

  • 162 18
    Samuel posted on 2018/05/10
Video vocabulary