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  • Hey guys!

  • Hey guys!

  • So this is a subject that we've talked a lot about in random videos,

  • but we've never dedicated any video to it before, so...

  • I feel like it's overdue

  • The subject of saying "I love you" in Japan

  • So it's kind of not a huge thing in Japan that a lot of people say to their loved ones.

  • But first I think we should start out by actually translating "I love you" into Japanese

  • Because there are a couple different ways to translate it

  • Mkay

  • So if you watch a drama or anime

  • A lot of the times you'll see a character saying "suki desu"

  • and that gets translated to "I love you"

  • Ahhhh~

  • I always get confused by that

  • Right

  • They're not even dating or anything, just...

  • Right, and then like, super suddenly

  • I LOVE YOU!!!

  • They're so intense!

  • What?

  • But "suki desu" actually means "I like you" and

  • Yeah

  • That's how you would directly translate it

  • You say...

  • Like, confession, right?

  • Right

  • I like you

  • Suki desu

  • Right

  • And you don't just use that to people, you say "suki desu" for anything

  • like "neko ga suki"

  • "I like cats" or whatever

  • I mean it's stronger than "I like cats"

  • but it's less, less, less than "I love you"

  • Right

  • And I think the confusion as to why that gets translated as love

  • comes down to the fact that "love" in English has a very broad range of meanings to it

  • Mkay

  • Like, that you can say "love" about a person where you really really

  • love that person and that has a lot of meaning to you

  • But you can also say like, "I LOVE THESE SHOES!" or whatever

  • and that's obviously not nearly as intense

  • So I feel like...

  • That's

  • That's not a common usage in Japan

  • You don't say really say "I love these shoes"

  • Right

  • So that's why I feel like when they say

  • When they translate "suki desu" to love, I feel like it's

  • that level of love in English

  • It's not like, you know, 100 intense level love

  • It's more like the English "I really like you"

  • That kind of thing

  • Hmmm

  • So, the level 100 love in Japan, in Japanese

  • that's "Aishiteru"

  • You would say "Aishiteru" for that

  • Normally it's a really strong and

  • Traditionally

  • Like, maybe you would say that in a

  • wedding ceremony?

  • Yeah, wedding ceremony

  • Jun has joked about it a lot of times before where

  • he said, to him it feels like something you would say on your death bed

  • Like a death bed confession to your loved one

  • "I love you"

  • *dies*

  • and then like, pass away?

  • Pass away

  • Like that

  • Like it's that level intense

  • So obviously this isn't everyone in Japan

  • there are people who say, um, "I love you" to their partners

  • I'm sure

  • Right?

  • In Japanese?

  • Yeah, in Japanese

  • Maybe

  • So we've seen Japanese commons before who

  • have agreed with Jun's like, usage of "I love you"

  • where it's like

  • It's something "You don't say that!"

  • that's like "That's really difficult to say!"

  • because it's like so intense

  • Yeah, we don't just say it

  • Yeah, you don't just say it here

  • I mean there are people in America who don't use it

  • lightly either

  • There are definitely families that, you know, don't show a lot of open affection like that

  • But it's different

  • But I feel like it's different because in my culture,

  • if you don't say "I love you" to your family members

  • then people think you're closed off

  • or they think that you're like

  • emotionally distant,

  • or maybe your family isn't very open with each other

  • So I mean there are people who don't say it

  • but there's a negative stigma to that

  • It's just different

  • But it's not,

  • that's not the case here

  • There's not a negative stigma to not saying it, right?

  • It's

  • It's something that's there

  • It's not something we say

  • if that makes sense to you

  • Right

  • Japan I guess, isn't a very like

  • verbally affectionate country

  • At least

  • this is how my interpretation of it from what I've heard

  • from Jun over these past 5 and a half years

  • It feels like you don't have to say it in Japanese, like

  • there's no need to say it because

  • people know

  • We just didn't grow up like that so it's also strange

  • so I can remember my family when I gave them a hug

  • at the airport, they're like super shy, they're like

  • Right

  • Yeah

  • I did it to make fun of them and just joke around

  • They were happy but they're uncomfortable too

  • Right

  • Because we didn't grow up like that

  • Right

  • And I think a lot of

  • foreign viewers who hear you say that are gonna say

  • "Isn't that just your family? Are there families that are

  • a lot more open in Japan?"

  • There are some families that are open,

  • but just saying "I love you" in Japanese

  • "Aishiteru"

  • is just not a thing, really

  • Maybe, but

  • I assume there aren't very many

  • I hear what Jun's saying and I understand it,

  • but it's really difficult for me to comprehend

  • not needing or wanting to say "I love you" because

  • it's just like so deeply ingrained in my culture

  • Maybe this is just me, but I'm sure there are

  • a lot of people like me too

  • Um

  • We do something nice, something considerate

  • does it make sense to you?

  • Right

  • Instead of saying it

  • Right

  • And we tried

  • We don't really try to prove it but

  • we do it by action

  • Not just words

  • Right

  • And we have a word for that

  • There's actually a really famous book in English

  • called "The Five Love Languages"

  • Okay

  • Where it breaks down 5 different ways that people

  • show their love and how they want to be shown love

  • And so I feel like Japan, like the entire country

  • is acts of service

  • So

  • *Pfftttt*

  • There's one that's called acts of service

  • Okay

  • So people show their love for other people by

  • doing things for them

  • Okay

  • So like, working, or doing household chores,

  • or cooking or something

  • AND THAT'S YOU

  • That's something like I do everyday, don't I?

  • THAT IS JUN

  • like all the way

  • He's like 100% acts of service

  • But you just think I'm just a nice person

  • But

  • Well, yeah for me

  • THAT'S FROM MY LOVE, okay?

  • That's how my love language

  • That's from my love

  • So I feel like there's

  • Japan as a culture leans toward acts of service

  • I'd say there's a word called "Omoiyari",

  • I think it's closer to what this

  • our concept of love

  • Right

  • Just

  • It's there

  • Right

  • You feel it

  • You feel it

  • Yup

  • And if you like,

  • grab a Japanese person, you wouldn't even think

  • about wanting to say it

  • But

  • But do you think they would be happy if their

  • partner say "I love you"?

  • If they say "I love you" in English, maybe

  • they're fine like me

  • Right

  • But if you just suddenly come home and just say

  • "Aishiteru" to your partner, normally they're

  • "Okay"

  • That's the reaction you'll probably get

  • What if it's like

  • What if it's after a nice date or something?

  • Or you had like, a nice like, deep conversation with them?

  • And you're having like a really good mood,

  • would they be happy if their partner said "Aishiteru"?

  • I think so

  • Well it depends of course

  • like it's a nice thing to say

  • It's just something you don't really say that often

  • or lightly

  • So just to let you guys know

  • we say it all the time in our relationship

  • Jun wasn't super comfortable with it at the

  • very beginning of our relationship

  • Even though he said it first

  • Um

  • But he got used to it really quickly after I guess,

  • like maybe two months

  • I don't remember how long it took me

  • So

  • Just

  • I'm growing up

  • And he says it

  • I think he says it more than I do now

  • We say it very often

  • Very frequently

  • We say it very frequently which

  • even in my culture some people don't like

  • Some people feel like the more you say it

  • the less meaning it has to it

  • That's exactly how I felt about it at first

  • That's how he felt about it at first

  • That's what Ryosuke said too

  • Right

  • And that's a very very common thing for people

  • to feel even in my culture

  • So that's not

  • That's not unique or strange at all

  • You know how I feel about it

  • We already have this conversation

  • Okay

  • So I guess that's all we really have to say about it now

  • but if you guys have any comments then

  • leave it down in the comments box below

  • It's there

  • It's there

  • It's there

  • You show it

  • You feel it, right?

  • I love you

  • I love you too

  • Byeeee

  • Byeee

  • Hi guys~