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  • (gentle music)

  • - Hello everyone, and welcome back to English with Lucy.

  • I've missed you guys. (laughs)

  • I've just come back from a lovely holiday, well...

  • Lovely in the sense that it was nice to get away,

  • but I did go to Cornwall with my family

  • and it was very rainy, it was very cloudy,

  • it was very English. (laughs)

  • I'm back now with another really exciting

  • advanced pronunciation video.

  • This video is gonna show you how you can speak more quickly,

  • and it's also gonna help you sound

  • more like a native speaker,

  • so it's a really really important one.

  • Before we get started, I'd just like to thank

  • the sponsor of today's video, Lingoda.

  • This video's gonna help you

  • with your speaking and your listening,

  • but if you want to take it a step further,

  • why not try Lingoda, I've done a full review video

  • which you can look at by clicking up here.

  • But basically it's an online language academy.

  • You sign up on a monthly subscription basis

  • and you get a mixture of group and private lessons

  • all done over video chat with real native teachers.

  • It's an excellent service that I completely endorse,

  • and it can be much more efficient and cost-effective

  • than going to a traditional language school.

  • They've given me a special discount for you guys.

  • You can get €50 or $50 off your first month at Lingoda.

  • All you have to do is click on the link

  • in the description box and use the code down there.

  • All you have to do is sign up using the code

  • and the link which is in the description box.

  • Right, let's get started with today's video.

  • So today, we're going to be talking about connected speech.

  • Connected speech.

  • There are four topics which we are going to cover,

  • catenation, intrusion, elision and assimilation.

  • Now, that probably sounds really complicated.

  • I don't like making English too theoretical,

  • but I think it's important that you recognise these terms.

  • I'm going to do a brief summary of each topic

  • and then some examples for you to practise with,

  • and then you can apply them to your daily speaking practise.

  • Let's go.

  • The first one, catenation, also referred to as linking.

  • This is when a consonant sound at the end of one word

  • is carried over to connect with the vowel sound

  • at the beginning of the next word.

  • In simple words, an apple, 'anapple'.

  • Catenation is really really important

  • if you don't want to sound like a robot.

  • Quite a lot of my students sound like this,

  • when they should be sounding like this.

  • And this is because they're not using catenation correctly.

  • Which sounds better, an apple or 'anapple'?

  • So as I said before, the consonant at the end

  • of the first word is carried over

  • to connect with the vowel sound

  • at the beginning of the next word.

  • 'Anapple'.

  • The N is carried over,

  • and the two words are squashed together.

  • Some other examples, it isn't.

  • I don't say it isn't nice, I say 'itisn't' nice.

  • Now it might seem like this takes a lot

  • of effort to do at first,

  • but once your brain gets used to it,

  • it will come to you naturally.

  • Now, the next topic I want to talk about is intrusion.

  • Intrusion.

  • Now, intrusion is when an extra sound intrudes

  • to make it easier to flow between two vowel sounds.

  • Now, the three most common sounds

  • that tend to intrude between vowel sounds

  • are 'yuh', 'wuh' and 'er'.

  • Let's talk about 'yuh' first.

  • Look at this sentence.

  • We all play out.

  • 'Weyall' play out.

  • 'Ee' and 'ay' vowel sounds

  • are often followed by the 'yuh' sound.

  • So, words that end in 'ee' or 'ay'

  • that are then followed by another word

  • beginning with a vowel sound have the 'yuh' intrusion.

  • 'Weyall' play out.

  • Words that end in 'oh' or 'oo' have the W.

  • So you can think about it like this.

  • If your mouth is wide, 'ee', 'ay', it's a 'yuh' sound.

  • If your mouth is round, 'oo', 'oh', then it's a 'wuh' sound.

  • I go out to open the window.

  • Go, 'o', 'gowout'.

  • 'U', two, 'twowobstacles'.

  • Then we have the last common intrusion

  • which is the 'er' sound.

  • Look at these words.

  • There is.

  • 'Thereris'.

  • Better, alone.

  • 'Betterralone'.

  • So British English is non-rhotic,

  • which means that we don't pronounce the 'R's

  • at the end of words.

  • I do have a video all about the 'shwa' sound

  • at the end of words which you can see

  • by clicking up here.

  • Media, expert.

  • 'Mediarexpert'.

  • So intrusion is a really really important thing

  • to think about if you want to speak more quickly

  • and in a more connected way.

  • I'd like to invite you to write in the comments

  • any sentences that have intrusion in them.

  • Okay, topic number three, elision.

  • Elision is the loss of a phoneme, a sound.

  • Normally it's the 'tuh' or 'duh' sound that is lost,

  • and normally it's the last phoneme of a word.

  • For example, next door.

  • I would never say I'm going next door.

  • I would always say I'm going 'nex' door.

  • So I've missed out the 'tuh' sound, 'nex' door.

  • Not next door, nex door.

  • Or most common, 'mos' common, 'mos' common.

  • Finally we have number four, which is assimilation.

  • Assimilation.

  • This is similar to elision,

  • but instead of a phoneme being dropped,

  • two phonemes come together and change

  • into a new phoneme, a new sound.

  • So for example, 'tuh' and 'yuh' together make a 'ch' sound.

  • When I'm speaking quickly in conversation,

  • I wouldn't say I'll meet you there.

  • I'd say I'll 'meechu' there.

  • Meechu, so 'tuh' and 'yuh',

  • meet you becomes 'meechu', 'meechu'.

  • It's not just two words coming together either,

  • it can happen in one word, like picture.

  • (laughs) We don't say pict-ure unless we're very posh,

  • we say 'pichure', 'pichure'.

  • Or instead of Tuesday, 'Chuesday', 'Chuesday'.

  • Another example is 'duh' and 'yuh'.

  • 'Duh' and 'yuh' together make 'juh', 'juh'.

  • Instead of saying did you, I say 'dijew'.

  • Right, that's it for the advanced pronunciation lesson.

  • If any of these topics have really interested you

  • and you'd like a more in-depth lesson,

  • please do comment below on which topic

  • is the most interesting and I'll try and make

  • a more in-depth video about it.

  • But in this video,

  • I kind of just wanted you to be aware of this,

  • so you can think about it whilst you speak.

  • It's highly likely that connected speech

  • exists in your language as well,

  • and there are similar pronunciation features.

  • Don't forget to connect with me on all of my social media,

  • I've got my Facebook, my Instagram and my Twitter.

  • And I will see you soon for another lesson, mwah.

(gentle music)

Subtitles and vocabulary

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A2 BEG UK yuh sound vowel elision tuh phoneme

The 4 Secrets to Speaking Quickly & Fluently - CONNECTED SPEECH #spon

  • 486 68
    Samuel   posted on 2018/05/11
Video vocabulary