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  • - You know The Foot, that roll, it's call Foot.

  • You never had one?

  • - No, no, no. - It's a green package right?

  • ^- I know what you're talking about.

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • - Favorite snack, I was like, whoa!

  • - I never ate it like that.

  • Just rip everything off and like punch it up into this like,

  • I don't have time for this shit.

  • (light music)

  • - Today I'm here with a couple of

  • my Korean American friends,

  • and we're gonna be talking about how we grew up in America

  • ^as Korean immigrants, or international students.

  • ^- I was born in Korea, Seoul.

  • ^I moved to Diamond Bar, D.B.

  • ^Went to college in Boston,

  • ^and then moved back to Diamond Bar.

  • ^- I was born in Korea,

  • ^so I moved out to America in 2002,

  • ^and then I came to California.

  • ^Ever since then, I just, I just stayed here.

  • ^- I came here in 2002 with my family.

  • ^My first place in the United States was Waikiki.

  • ^After Hawaii, I got L.A., O.C., the Fullerton.

  • ^Now I'm living right next to the La Christina,

  • ^- [Evan] Basically California (mumbles).

  • ^but, yeah, yeah, yeah, right.

  • ^- I was born in Korea, 2002,

  • ^our family work decided to move to New Zealand first.

  • ^2006, I moved to the sin city, Las Vegas.

  • ^And then I moved to Idaho for Boise City University.

  • ^- And then you've been living here.

  • ^- For almost a year.

  • (plucky string music)

  • ^- I don't think I've ever talked about this.

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • ^(laughs)

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • ^(laughs)

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • ^- Thanks to social media,

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • ^- I'm an only child, right.

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • ^like a brother and a sister.

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • ^(all exclaim)

  • ^- That was a thing.

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • ^(laughs)

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • (light drum music)

  • - My close group of friends, we do speak English,

  • but, it's like back and forth, Korean and English.

  • - Yeah, just like half, half, right?

  • We would say one sentence in English,

  • and we would say the next sentence in Korean.

  • Most of my guy friends are English-speaking friends,

  • but almost all female friends are Korean speakers.

  • Which is interesting.

  • - My friends, like, more than 70%, they use Korean.

  • Some of them, they mix use, like one sentence Korean,

  • one sentence in English.

  • - The majority of my friends are English-only.

  • But, I think ever since I moved into California,

  • it's more both cultures of Korean and America.

  • ^- You guys all do speak Korean in your households, right?

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • ^- Hi, Mrs. Lim!

  • (laughs)

  • (groovy music)

  • - I listened to a lot of music.

  • - Hip-hop.

  • ^- [Evan] I like 50 Cent and The Game.

  • - I think I was more like an R&B.

  • ^- Oh, Omarion. - Whoo!

  • ^- [Danny] Omarion, Chris Brown.

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • - B2K.

  • - Bom, bom, bom, that song, right?

  • - So I picked up a lot of slang,

  • so a lot of kids make fun of me.

  • You have to learn English first, and then learn slang.

  • - So you just dropped like F-bombs?

  • - No, I didn't curse.

  • 'Cause a lot of rap songs,

  • grammatically it doesn't make sense,

  • you know what I mean, right?

  • TV shows, Friends, Prince of Bel-Air.

  • - I don't watch any of that shit.

  • - Pokemon.

  • - [All] Pokemon!

  • - My age was 18 right,

  • so I had to make some cash at that moment,

  • so like, I got a job.

  • Coffee place, like a Starbucks in the mall.

  • I need to get orders from customers, right.

  • But my English was really, really short.

  • So this one lady came up, and they're like,

  • "No, Asian boy, listen up," you know,

  • and like she keep (mumbles) again and again,

  • and I'm like, I need to write it down.

  • - Bring that lady right here.

  • (laughs)

  • - I remember your face, still.

  • - Yeah, that must have helped you a lot,

  • I mean, especially working.

  • - It was really hard.

  • Many nights I cried.

  • Sorry (laughs).

  • - In elementary school when I first moved,

  • I wanted to get a Gatorade,

  • but I couldn't pronounce it, like how I just said it.

  • I was like, Getorade.

  • Hi, can I get a Geterade?

  • (laughs)

  • The lady who was working at the cafeteria,

  • she wasn't really fluent in English either.

  • She was like, what?

  • She couldn't get it, so I couldn't buy it.

  • I remember just going to drink like, fountain water.

  • Sadness.

  • (upbeat xylophone music)

  • - I think in both languages, actually.

  • - I kind of understand,

  • but I don't think a lot of viewers who understand...

  • - [Evan] Wait, what, there's no way!

  • Korean or--

  • - I don't think I think that much,

  • I can't say this, I don't know.

  • - [Evan] Here's a good one,

  • do you count in English or in Korean?

  • - One, no in English.

  • - English, english?

  • I count in Korean. - [Danny] Oh, really?

  • - Yeah, it's a lot faster.

  • (speaking foreign language)

  • instead of one, two, three, four, five, six, seven.

  • - Oh, really, you do it in Korean?

  • - Whenever I jot down numbers, I always think in Korean.

  • - [Danny] Oh, really?

  • No, I process it in English.

  • - As you speak, I can understand both languages in my mind.

  • - Right now, I'm thinking in English.

  • - Okay.

  • (laughs)

  • (light music)

  • - Where I grew up, people used to say

  • that Asians are minorities here,

  • but I've never really felt that way,

  • from middle school to high school

  • 'cause about 80% were Asians.

  • - Oh, wow.

  • - Yeah, I was never really picked on,

  • up until I went to Boston.

  • Yeah, and then I was like the only Asian out of 400 kids,

  • and I was like, okay, this is a little weird.

  • - For me, in middle school, in New Jersey,

  • a lot of kids called me F.O.B., of course.

  • F.O.B. stands for fresh off the boat.

  • It's a daily name that I just had to go through.

  • Every time I go to school, it's like an insult,

  • you know, nobody wants to be called F.O.Bs, you know.

  • But right now it's okay, like I'm all grown up,

  • we can take it as a joke.

  • But when you're like 12 or 13, it's traumatic.

  • What I clearly remember is,

  • there was this Korean guy in middle school.

  • He spoke zero Korean,

  • but he made an effort to speak Korean

  • so that he could help throughout my school days.

  • He saw other kids making fun of me.

  • You know, you're supposed to protect me,

  • but he like, started making fun of me with them.

  • And he's like joining them to make fun of me.

  • ^So like that--

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • ^(laughs)

  • I hope this doesn't happen anymore.

  • - I think when I was in high school,

  • people called me like High Definition.

  • - Why is it high def?

  • - 'Cause the widescreen, 'cause of the eyes.

  • - No way. - Dude, that is so messed up.

  • - High definition... - So messed up.

  • - Something like, I just hope that watching this,

  • like they will learn not to say in those kind of manner.

  • (light music)

  • - Wearing shoes inside.

  • - Oh, yeah.

  • - Do you guys realize how dirty your shoes are?

  • - You go everywhere wearing shoes,

  • so you have all that germ, and especially like carpets.

  • - Yeah.

  • It collects more dust, so it's even worse.

  • - Carpet flooring is actually my other culture shock.

  • I've never seen carpet flooring in Korea.

  • Korean school, your class stays as it is,

  • and then your teacher.

  • - You have to move, yeah.

  • - But in America, the students move, in America.

  • So in the American school you have to make more friends.

  • In Korea, you're stuck with them you're entire year.

  • It was a good culture shock.

  • I was like, oh, this is cool.

  • - For me, it's to pay tips after you eat something.

  • - [All] Yes.

  • - In Korea, there's no tip culture.

  • - Hot Cheetos.

  • Oh, my God, Cheetos, when I first had Hot Cheetos,

  • it was like party in mouth, I was like, whoa!

  • What is this?

  • (relaxing music)

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • - Of course you have a language barrier,

  • you know, English isn't your first language.

  • I'm a very outgoing person as you can all see,

  • but like, when I first moved here,

  • I got more introverted because I didn't know the language.

  • I didn't know the culture,

  • so I was just scared to talk to people.

  • You just have to break out of that

  • and if you can't speak English,

  • it's not stress for you,

  • it's stress for the person you're talking to. (laughs)

  • If he doesn't understand, he's gonna get stressed,

  • ^but like, you just have to speak your mind.

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • ^(laughs)

  • ^(speaking foreign language)

  • (bluesy music)

  • (whooshing and squeaking)

- You know The Foot, that roll, it's call Foot.

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Korean Men Talk About Growing Up In America

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    Samuel posted on 2018/05/04
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