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  • Hi, I'm Martin.

  • Welcome to Oxford Online English!

  • In this lesson, you can learn how to talk about the future in English.

  • What are you doing this evening?

  • What are your plans for next year?

  • Who will win the next World Cup?

  • In this class, you'll learn to answer these and other questions about the future in clear,

  • natural, correct English.

  • You'll see many simple phrases which you can learn to help you talk about the future

  • in English in any situation!

  • Let's start with a simple question: what are you doing this weekend?

  • What are you doing this weekend?

  • I'm meeting some friends for lunch on Saturday, and then we're going to the theatre.

  • Sounds good!

  • What about Sunday?

  • Not sure.

  • I don't have plans yet.

  • What about youdoing anything fun?

  • I'm going away for the weekend.

  • Really?

  • Nice!

  • Where are you going?

  • Berlin!

  • I found some cheap flights.

  • Let's look at some useful language you saw in this dialogue:

  • What are you doing this weekend?

  • This is a very common question.

  • You can change it and use it in different situations, like this:

  • What are you doing tomorrow?

  • What are you doing tonight?

  • What are you doing next Wednesday evening?

  • How could you answer these three questions?

  • Here are some possible answers:

  • I'm working in the morning, then I'm playing football in the park with some friends.

  • I'm going for a beer with some people from work.

  • Next Wednesday?

  • No idea!

  • I haven't made any plans yet.

  • Can you see what verb form you need in these questions and answers?

  • You often need the present continuous tense.

  • You can use the present continuous to talk about the future, even though it's a present

  • tense.

  • You can use the present continuous to talk about plans if you know where or when something

  • will happen.

  • Usually, you use it to talk about the near future.

  • However, you can also use it for plans which are further in the future, like holiday plans.

  • Let's see some examples of this: Are you going anywhere next summer?

  • We're going to Cornwall.

  • It's the same place we go every year.

  • I've heard it's beautiful there!

  • How long are you staying there?

  • Just a week.

  • Are you going in July?

  • I'm thinking about going, just for two or three days.

  • No, we're going in August.

  • Who are you going with?

  • I'm going with two old college friends.

  • Well, if you come in August, we can show you around!

  • I'm working in August, unfortunately.

  • Here, you heard useful questions to ask someone about their vacation plans:

  • Are you going anywhere this summer?

  • How long are you staying there?

  • Who are you going with?

  • Can you answer these three questions?

  • Pause the video and make your own answers.

  • Now, put your answers together in one sentence, like this:

  • I'm going to Egypt for 10 days with a group of friends.

  • Next, add some more details about what you're planning to do!

  • For example:

  • I'm going to Egypt for 10 days with a group of friends.

  • We're planning to do some sightseeing around Cairo, then we're going to do a boat trip

  • on the Nile.

  • Can you see something different in this sentence?

  • We said:

  • We're planning to do some sightseeing around Cairo.

  • We're going to do a boat trip on the Nile.

  • Here, you're using two verbs: planning to do and going to do.

  • Do you know why?

  • Let's see the answer:

  • You use the present continuous to talk about plans if you know

  • where or when something will happen.

  • That means you often need the present continuous to talk about plans in the near future.

  • What about plans in the future if you don't know exactly where or when things will happen?

  • Is it true?

  • You quit?

  • Yes!

  • I'm done with this place, and it feels great!

  • What are you going to do now?

  • You know, first of all I'm planning to take some time to rest and recover my energy.

  • I've been so stressed the last few months.

  • Sure, but then how are you going to find a new job?

  • Actually, I'd like to start my own business.

  • I'm tired of working for other people.

  • Really?

  • What kind of thing are you thinking of doing?

  • My dream is to have my own small marketing firm.

  • I'm hoping to start with freelancing, and then build up from there.

  • Wowgood luck!

  • Here, you saw useful phrases to talk about plans if you don't know all the details

  • yet.

  • Do you remember any of the questions and phrases?

  • Here's some of the key language you saw:

  • What are you going to do now?

  • I'm planning to take some time to rest.

  • I'd like to start my own business.

  • My dream is to have my own marketing firm.

  • You can change these sentences to fit different situations, like this:

  • What are you going to do after you graduate?

  • I'm planning to buy an apartment next year.

  • I'd like to learn to scuba dive one day.

  • My dream is to live near the sea, where it's sunny all year round.

  • You can use these to talk about future plans, dreams and ideas.

  • What about you?

  • What are your plans, dreams and ideas for the future?

  • Use these templates and make four sentences about your life and your plans.

  • Say the sentences aloud, or write them down, or both!

  • Now, you know how to talk about all kinds of future plans in English.

  • What other things do you need to talk about in the future?

  • What time does the concert start?

  • 8.00, so we need to leave at 6.30.

  • Is there a bus?

  • Yeah, I think it leaves at 6.45, and it gets there around 7.30.

  • What time does it finish?

  • It's supposed to end at ten.

  • The last bus back leaves at 10.15, so we'll have to hurry.

  • Here, you saw us talking about schedules.

  • Do you remember what language you heard?

  • You can use the present simple to talk about future schedules or timetables.

  • For example:

  • What time does the concert start?

  • The bus gets there around 7.30.

  • The last bus leaves at 10.15.

  • You can use this to talk about public transport, class timetables, work schedules, events,

  • or anything else which runs on a timetable.

  • For example:

  • Our class starts at eleven thirty.

  • What time is your flight?

  • The wedding is at three.

  • Now, it's your turn!

  • Think of three things in your life which run on a timetable.

  • Make three sentences using the present simple.

  • Want an extra challenge?

  • Make questions and answers, like this:

  • What time does the train leave?

  • It leaves at five thirty.

  • Pause the video and make your three sentences now.

  • Again, write them down if you want some extra practice.

  • Ooh!

  • We forgot something… a very important question.

  • Oh?

  • What's that?

  • You don't remember?

  • At the beginning: who's going to win the next World Cup?

  • What do you think?

  • Maybe you said something like:

  • Italy will win.

  • I hope Russia will win, but I don't think they actually will.

  • England definitely won't win it.

  • To make predictions about the future, you can use will or won't.

  • You can also use going to.

  • You generally use going to for predictions that are not so far in the future:

  • It's going to rainlook at those clouds.

  • What do you think is going to happen next?

  • He's going to be unhappy when he finds out about this.

  • That said, don't worry about the difference between will and going to here.

  • You can use both freelyno one will notice.

  • You can also use many other phrases to make predictions.

  • Let's look: So, do you think they'll do it?

  • Michelle will definitely do it.

  • There's no chance Andy is going to finish.

  • He doesn't look like he can run to the bus stop, so I can't believe he'll run 26

  • miles.

  • I don't know.

  • He's been training hard.

  • He's unlikely to get a fast time, but I'm pretty sure he'll do it.

  • Well, anyway, we can agree that Michelle is sure to be much faster!

  • Yeah, of course.

  • Do you think she'll do it in under three hours?

  • It's not likely that she'll do it that fast.

  • Under three hours for a marathon is quick.

  • But, she's bound to get under four hours.

  • That's still a good time.

  • There, we were talking about two people running a marathon, and making predictions about how

  • they would do.

  • Apart from will and going to, did you notice any other language we used to make predictions

  • about the future?

  • Firstly, you can modify will or going to by adding an adverb, like this:

  • She'll definitely do it.

  • There's no chance he's going to finish.

  • I'm pretty sure he'll do it.

  • In this way, you can show that you're more or less sure about your prediction.

  • You also heard some other phrases you can use to make predictions in the future:

  • He's unlikely to get a fast time.

  • She's sure to be much faster.

  • It's not likely that she'll do it that fast.

  • She's bound to get under four hours.

  • Likely has a similar meaning to probable.

  • Be careful, because likely is an adjective, not an adverb.

  • So, if you say He's unlikely to get a fast time, you mean that he'll probably be quite

  • slow.

  • Sure to and bound to both mean that you're absolutely certain about something.

  • You can use them to emphasise how sure you are.

  • These phrases are a little less common.

  • However, they are good to know, so you can add variety to your spoken English.

  • Let's see how you could use these phrases in some other ways:

  • They're unlikely to hire you if you have so little experience.

  • It's exactly your kind of filmyou're sure to like it.

  • It's not likely that I'll wake up before nine.

  • He's a really good cook; whatever he makes, it's bound to be delicious.

  • Note also that likely can be used with both a positive and a negative meaning.

  • You can say It's unlikely thator He's not likely to

  • However, sure to and bound to are always positive.

  • Now, it's your turn!

  • Pause the video and make four predictions about the future.

  • You could make predictions about the weather, sport, your life, or anything you like!

  • Make four sentences, say them aloud, and write them down if you want extra practice.

  • Done?

  • Next, let's look at one more topic you need to talk about the future.

  • Up to now, you've learned how to talk about things in the future that you are certain

  • about.

  • However, the future is often uncertain.

  • How can you express this when you speak English?

  • Let's look: So, do you have any idea when you'll have

  • finished everything?

  • It really depends.

  • It may be ready next week if everything goes well.

  • We really need it done sooner.

  • The thing is, it's possible that we'll have to replace some of the artwork.

  • That could take a few days.

  • Ok, I have to ask: why are you making such big changes so late?

  • For a project like this, those details should be finalised by now.

  • We had some issues, but anyway, let's focus on what we can do now.

  • Perhaps we won't need to change anything.

  • In that case, it'll definitely be finished by the end of next week.

  • Even that's too late.

  • Look, you need to sort this out.

  • Maybe I'll work overtime this weekend.

  • That might help.

  • Just do what you have to.

  • In this dialogue, I was an employee, and I wasn't very sure about a lot of things.

  • I used different words and phrases to show that I wasn't sure.

  • Do you remember any of them?