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  • - Oh look who it is.

  • Andrew!

  • Andrew!

  • - How did you find me?

  • - It is the day.

  • The day we've all been waiting for.

  • Fried chicken.

  • - Fried chicken. - Fried chicken.

  • - Let's eat that fried chicken.

  • - Alrighty. - Alrighty.

  • - Today, okay.

  • We are in New York City, baby.

  • Today on worth it, we are going to be trying

  • three fried chicken spots at three drastically

  • different price points to find out which

  • fried chicken is the most worth it at its price.

  • - Let's go.

  • - We gotta talk about it.

  • - My name is Kenneth Woods.

  • I'm president and CEO of Sylvia's.

  • I'm a son of Sylvia, as a matter of fact.

  • - It's an iconic place, this restaurant.

  • - Yeah, back in the 60's, everyone was

  • leaving the South and coming to the city.

  • Sylvia's is home away from home.

  • Everyone felt comfortable.

  • The stars, the politicians, the mom and pop.

  • A few weeks ago we had three birthdays.

  • Ladies that was all over 90 years old,

  • and three different parties.

  • - The great equalizer.

  • - We do it traditional Southern style.

  • Just like how my grandma used to make her chicken.

  • - Is that where the recipe comes from, is a family recipe?

  • - Yeah. We use a three and a half pound chicken,

  • trim it good, then season it evenly,

  • don't just season it and throw it in the fryer.

  • Massage it like when you clean a

  • baby with the baby oil on them.

  • That's how you do the chicken.

  • - You create a baby with love and

  • you create a fried chicken with love.

  • - That's right, you treat the fried chicken with love.

  • Let it marinate, then drench it in all-purpose flour.

  • Pat it to knock off the excess, fry it

  • for 12 minutes and enjoy what you're doing.

  • - Yeah.

  • - It's amazing to be the oldest,

  • the authentic, the original,

  • all of those little phrases, you know, mean something.

  • - Alright, well I think its time to try the fried chicken.

  • - Fried freaking chicken.

  • - One of the best meats with one of the best preparations.

  • Welcome to flavor town.

  • Oh man.

  • Oh, there's like a extra crunchy little bit right here.

  • - The skin is a perfect shell.

  • - It's like a suit of armor for a chicken knight.

  • - You ready?

  • - I am ready.

  • - Oh my gosh, it's so juicy on the back.

  • - I'm ready.

  • - To fried chicken.

  • Mmmm.

  • - That's (bleep) good.

  • - Oh I'm lost.

  • Oh wait no, I'm in fried chicken heaven.

  • That is like music to my ears.

  • It's so juicy inside.

  • It's just melting like butter.

  • - It's a food that takes a bath

  • when it gets cooked, it has to be good.

  • I'm shocked at how simple the preparation,

  • actually, is to get this product.

  • - That's when you know you've mastered a craft,

  • when you can make it look easy.

  • - It really is seasoned down to the bone.

  • Maybe the saddest sound at a fried chicken dinner.

  • (bone clinking on plate)

  • That was less dramatic than I thought it would be.

  • - Dramatic or drumatic?

  • - Did you just make a pun?

  • - Dra-matic or dru-matic?

  • - I think Steven just made a really good pun.

  • - Yeah that was on purpose.

  • Let's try some of the collard greens.

  • - That is the perfect thing to eat alongside of this.

  • Pretty (bleep) good right?

  • - Just walked out of Sylvia's, which is right there.

  • We're going to Red Rooster, which is over there.

  • But, we need to walk off some off this fried chicken.

  • So, wanna talk a lap around the block?

  • What did you think about Sylvia's?

  • - Crispy, simple, juicy.

  • Can't ask for more than that.

  • - So now we're going to...

  • - Wait, wait, wait, do you hear that?

  • That's the sound of: fried chicken fact.

  • According to the National Chicken Council,

  • the average American eats over 90 pounds

  • of chicken each year.

  • - I guess that makes sense.

  • It's gross when you think about it.

  • Just picturing a 90 pound chicken

  • that looks like a rottweiler.

  • - Ew.

  • - I guess that's like probably what a

  • small dinosaur would look like.

  • - Your tummy feeling okay?

  • - It's ready for more, it's always ready for more.

  • - Alrighty.

  • - Did you just try to hold my hand?

  • - What, no.

  • You're standing very close to me.

  • Okay.

  • - Fried chicken.

  • - Welcome everybody.

  • My name is Chef Marcus Samuelsson.

  • Right now, you're at Red Rooster.

  • When I thought about Red Rooster,

  • it was about, "How do I tackle fried chicken?"

  • Being neighbor with the most iconic

  • restaurant in Harlem of all time, Sylvia's,

  • we can talk a lot about what we have it common.

  • What does it mean to be a

  • restaurant in a community like Harlem?

  • For me, it's all about hiring.

  • We have about 180 employees, 70% from Harlem

  • and so I could never have dreamt that the

  • community would take so much ownership of the restaurant.

  • It's a push and pull.

  • When we make a mistake, they'll let us know,

  • when we improve something, they'll let us know.

  • - What is the name of the dish we're having today?

  • - Fried Yard Bird.

  • Yard Bird to me was just like birds running

  • around in the back, you know,

  • when you didn't have food, you could go out

  • into the yard and just cut a chicken.

  • And it's something that both from my

  • Ethiopian and my Swedish heritage.

  • I want a seasoned oil, so I'm flavoring

  • it with a little bit of rosemary, and garlic.

  • We have our bird.

  • A little bit of pickling brine, sugar, salt,

  • little bit of buttermilk.

  • Best thing is that the bird can be there overnight.

  • And then in our flour mix, we have a shake,

  • but it's the one ingredient that I will

  • let you know that's in that mix.

  • - And what is that?

  • - That is a spice blend from Ethiopia.

  • Large chilies, not super spiced ginger,

  • garlic, it has this beautiful taste of Ethiopia.

  • You want the right amount of flour,

  • so you get that crunchiness.

  • I landed on twice fried chicken.

  • The first fry is really all about cooking it through.

  • Then you lift it out, let it rest.

  • Then you just dip it again and fry it

  • to get really nice and crunchy.

  • I have a little bit of oil from that

  • flavored oil that we cooked in,

  • little bit of honey, and our Rooster sauce.

  • All of that stuff that I've used, comes back in.

  • It's really a reflection of poor man's cooking.

  • If you ever think about the food of the South,

  • everyone that was working class

  • ate pretty much the same.

  • Out of that came certain flavor points.

  • As the migration moved the population up, the food stayed.

  • Obviously, it tastes different in New York or

  • Detroit than it does in Virginia or Kentucky.

  • The methods stay just as much as jazz came up,

  • and today we have hip hop because of it.

  • The DNA is really the foods of the migration.

  • - So we got the Yard Bird.

  • - We also got some bourbon on the rocks,

  • because it's a hot day in Harlem.

  • - Oh I'm ready now.

  • Strangely, very sweet.

  • - Yeah, he said there's a hot honey in that.

  • Hot honey is what they called me in high school.

  • - Tell me who called you that.

  • - No one.

  • - Dibs on that one.

  • - Sure, go for it.

  • Because this one's clearly better.

  • - Oooh.

  • - Smells so good.

  • Oh my god.

  • - I got it on my nose.

  • Chicken cheers.

  • - That is some juicy chicken, holy (bleep).

  • - That is a sophisticated flavor.

  • - It's that nice, deep, roasted, slightly

  • bitter nutty flavor that he was talking about.

  • - Andrew with the adjectives.

  • - Adjective Andrew.

  • - Ooh.

  • - I can't believe how juicy this meat is.

  • And the skin is...

  • - Perfection. - Oh, (bleep).

  • - I just got some skin in my Bourbon.

  • - The skin is crispy and it melts in your mouth.

  • That's like making love

  • and I don't have any experience in that department.

  • - Really?

  • - I don't, but if I'm gonna be honest here,

  • that's what I imagine it's like.

  • The chicken and I have become one.

  • - You know what, I'm not gonna spoil anything for you.

  • I got it all over my face, I know.

  • - [Cameraman] You look like the Joker.

  • It's so good. - It's crazy.

  • - Can I jump in? - Please.

  • - I really thought I was gonna get to eat that,

  • but it's okay.

  • - Should we go to the cornbread next to soak this up?

  • - It's grimy, man.

  • - Grimy in a good way?

  • - (Chef Marcus) Yeah, word to the bird.

  • And like that, he's gone.

  • The structural integrity of this

  • skin with the coating is unreal.

  • It's like soft and supple, but strong and mysterious.

  • - Adjective Andrew, back at it again.

  • - Adjective Andrew.

  • Sweet potato yams.

  • The yams are like dessert mashed potatoes.

  • So there's one piece of chicken left.

  • Can I have it?

  • - Can we order some more?

  • - I asked Marcus if he had any suggestions for dessert.

  • - It's so hot.

  • - Turns out, Make My Cake, makes some great cake.

  • Thank you.

  • That may have been...

  • - It was the best fried chicken I've ever had.

  • I said it first.

  • - I couldn't have said it better...

  • - We went to the quintessential Harlem fried chicken spot.

  • - Now we're going to: fried chicken fact town.

  • - Oh, I forgot about that.

  • - How much chicken do you think the

  • United States consumes every year?

  • - A trillion chickens.

  • - A trillion chickens?

  • - I'll recalculate a little bit.

  • - Alright, recalibrate.

  • - Two billion chickens.

  • - Not bad, eight billion chickens.

  • - Eight billion?