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  • Hey guys welcome to Fingtam Languages.

  • Today's video is gonna be about my method that I use for learning languages through songs.

  • Now if you're new to this channel,

  • I produce a new video every Monday and every Friday

  • about ways that you can learn languages more effectively.

  • So if that's interesting to you feel free to click on the subscribe button down below.

  • Now on this channel, my three main goals are to make language learning fast, fun and easy,

  • and I think learning languages through songs accomplishes all three of those goals.

  • So my first tip for learning languages with songs and this probably comes as no surprise is just

  • listening to the song a lot.

  • So listen while you're in the car listen while you're cooking cleaning

  • listen while you have any amount of free time,

  • and my favorite method for that is the Spotify app on my iPad.

  • They have pretty much every song you can imagine,

  • and they have all kinds of languages.

  • So no matter what languages you're learning you they probably have songs in that language.

  • A Spotify app for the iPad and for the computer is really nice, it's completely free.

  • The app for your phone is a little bit more limited unless you want the paid subscription,

  • but on the iPad and on the computer, it's great.

  • You just have to listen to a short advertisement,

  • and then you get to listen to whatever music you want.

  • My next tip is to print off a physical lyrics sheets with a glossary on the side,

  • and that's exactly what I did. Here you see, I have the lyrics printed off,

  • and I just found the lyrics to this song and Ultimate-guitar.com.

  • After I printed it off, I just went through and read the whole song,

  • and I found a bunch of words that I was not familiar with,

  • so I wrote those songs (words) over here on the side.

  • And then when I finished that and went on to wordreference.com,

  • and I looked up the definitions.

  • And this is a really helpful thing to reference the first few times you hear the song.

  • You just read through the lyrics as you listen to the song one or two times,

  • and then it just takes a few times listening to the song before you know all the words and all their meanings.

  • That's a really easy way to boost your vocabulary,

  • and it's going to stop you from getting totally lost in the song every time you listen to it.

  • So it's gonna make your time more productive.

  • Now Google translates and word reference can only take you so far when you're translating words word for word,

  • and anyone who speaks Spanish knows

  • that this translation that Google Translate gave me is really wrong and really funny.

  • That's why my second piece of advice for learning languages with songs is

  • to ask advice from native speakers on apps like Reddit and HiNative.

  • A lot of times music uses certain phrases and words that are very colloquial

  • they use a lot of slang, so that's why HiNative is a great resource for this.

  • HiNative is an app that allows you to ask bite-sized translation related questions to native speakers,

  • and you can see here I asked a question about

  • a line from the song that I'm learning.

  • And I just asked what does this mean because it uses some

  • slang vocabulary words that I'm just not familiar with,

  • and then a native speaker of Canadian French came on and she told me what that means,

  • and you can see

  • that there's probably a good reason I had no idea what this means because it was a little bit vulgar,

  • and they don't teach you that kind of stuff in the classroom,

  • but people online that are native speakers, and they're experts in the dialect.

  • They'll help you understand what's going on in that song, so this is an invaluable resource.

  • And Reddit is also a great place where you can go and ask questions.

  • Just go to the subreddit of whatever language you're learning,

  • post your question,

  • and you'll get at least one or two answers within the next hour as long as it's one of the more major languages of the world.

  • My third tip is to practice these songs while practicing with an actual instrument .

  • Now if you already play an instrument you probably do this all the time,

  • so this is just a natural extension and another way for you to incorporate your language into your daily routine.

  • And if you don't play an instrument yet,

  • it's actually really easy to get started.

  • You can get a cheap ukulele on Amazon or on eBay for like twenty to thirty dollars,

  • and there's all kinds of tutorials on YouTube that will tell you how to play that instrument.

  • Then all you have to do is just look up the chords for that instrument on ultimate-guitar.com,

  • and you instantly have a new and exciting way of practicing your language.

  • This is why I get most of my lyrics off of ultimate-guitar.com,

  • because they actually give you the chords to go along with the lyrics.

  • And then it's extremely easy.

  • You just to pick up the guitar, or sit down at the piano and play through whatever song you want to learn.

  • Just one more suggestion on the instrument front before we get to my last tip is

  • this instrument called a strum stick and you've probably never seen anything like this before.

  • It's really interesting but I promise this is the easiest instrument you will ever play in your entire life.

  • This is a pretty nice model, and it was a little bit more expensive at about a hundred dollars,

  • but you can get cheaper versions too.

  • There's only three strings on this instruments,

  • and they leave out a bunch of frets making it way simpler to play,

  • and it makes it so that you can't even play wrong notes for the key that you're playing in.

  • It's really easy for beginners strum stick players

  • to just use one finger in just this one string,

  • and you can actually make some pretty cool music.

  • Watch me play La Vie En Rose with just one finger on this strum stick.

  • Once you have your strum stick for a few days,

  • you can move past the one finger technique and move into very simple chords

  • that never take more than two fingers.

  • And believe it or not, you can actually play some pretty complicated stuff on this strum stick,

  • so it's a lot of fun even for advanced musicians.

  • Okay, sorry for that side rant about strum sticks.

  • I'm just really passionate about spreading music,

  • so I'm not gonna say any more about that.

  • But if you are interested in this strum stick then you can check out my link right here,

  • because I think I'm going to start posting more videos on that subject on another channel.

  • And my last tip is to listen to those songs in slow motion.

  • And I have two main ways of doing this.

  • The first and the simplest way is on YouTube

  • and the second way that is more complex but more customizable is with Audacity.

  • Now the first method I want to show you is how to slow down in songs on YouTube,

  • and I just covered this a week or two ago in my pronunciation video,

  • so I'm not gonna spend too much time on it.

  • But this is a really nice way to slow down videos on YouTube

  • so that you can hear exactly how the singers are pronouncing their words,

  • and I'm gonna first play this song at regular speed,

  • so you can really listen to how she pronounces these R.

  • Because she has a really interesting way of pronouncing these R's in the song.

  • And see how she has those really uvular trilled Rs and that's really interesting.

  • So I'm gonna slow this down a little bit and just get a better listen.

  • You can really hear her trilling those Rs when she slows it down.

  • And you want to be careful because if you slow it down too much,

  • then you'll really get really distorted sound.

  • So it's funny, you can really hear her doing that vibrato in there.

  • Now YouTube is good because it's nice and simple.

  • You just go to this little thing here, and then you can adjust the speed.

  • But Audacity is more powerful, and you'll just go to audacityteam.org,

  • and you have to download this software.

  • But it's free and it's really nice, and I can actually show you an example right now,

  • because Audacity is what I'm using to record the audio as we speak.

  • So I can't show you in a real example because I'm recording it right now.

  • But what you would do is you would go up here and you would import your favorite song,

  • using open you just open an mp3 version of the song,

  • then you would highlight it, highlight the portion that you want to slow down or highlight the whole song

  • then you'll go to Effect, and you would go to Change Speed.

  • And I'm in the middle of recording right now, so you can't change the speed.

  • But if you just had a paused Mp3 then you could change the speed of it,

  • and you can slow it down to 90% or 95%, 80% if you want.

  • you but you want to find a good balance of where to slow it down,

  • because, like over here, if you slow it down to 75%

  • that's not too bad.

  • But once you slow it down to 50 that's really distorted.

  • So you want to keep it around 90, 95 maybe

  • 75 is kind of pushing the edges of it.

  • But if you slow it down to 90% you can still listen to that song and enjoy.

  • It's just as a slower version of the song,

  • and there's not too much distortion at that point.

  • So this is just a really nice way of being able to slow down a song and really zoom in and get a good idea

  • get a good idea of exactly what the singer is doing and how they're pronouncing the words.

  • So I really hope you guys take the initiative to start using music to learn languages,

  • because I think that's gonna be a big factor in helping you become more fluent in your language.

  • And before I go,

  • I'm gonna leave you with a video of myself practicing Esperanto on the piano.

Hey guys welcome to Fingtam Languages.

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A2 US strum instrument slow listen learning play

5 tips for learning languages with music (2018)

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    Fingtam posted on 2018/08/12
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