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  • (playful music)

  • - Hello everyone,

  • and welcome back to English With Lucy.

  • Today I have got a video for you,

  • as you can tell by the title

  • of 10 expressions that use the verb,

  • the verb,

  • the verb verb,

  • expressions using the verb to have.

  • I know that to have is a verb,

  • well, it's an auxiliary verb.

  • It's a verb that can be really,

  • really confusing for you guys

  • because it has so many different meanings,

  • and it's used so frequently.

  • It's kind of difficult in the moment when you hear it

  • to work out exactly what it means,

  • but I have 10 phrases,

  • 10 expressions.

  • They're idiomatic.

  • They're ones that you would use in more informal situations.

  • You'd hear them a lot in the United Kingdom.

  • I think most of them would be used in the US

  • and in other English-speaking countries as well.

  • So they're pretty universal,

  • but they're seriously, seriously useful.

  • So let's get started with the lesson.

  • Quickly, before we get started,

  • nah kidding, not today.

  • (laughs)

  • Let's get started with the lesson.

  • Number one, my first expression using have

  • is to have a laugh.

  • To have a laugh.

  • Now to have a laugh means to kid around,

  • or to be joking,

  • or even to have a joke can be said as well.

  • So if I say to you,

  • are you having a laugh?

  • I'm essentially saying, are you joking?

  • Or sorry, I was just having a laugh.

  • Sorry, I was just joking.

  • I wasn't being serious.

  • Number two, is to have somebody on.

  • To have somebody on.

  • So it's a separable,

  • and this one is always separable, phrasal verb.

  • In this context,

  • in this context,

  • it must always be separated.

  • It is a separable one for this meaning.

  • It sort of means to persuade somebody

  • that something is true,

  • when in reality, it isn't.

  • So if I don't believe something

  • that somebody is saying to me,

  • I'll say,

  • are you having me on?

  • Are you trying to persuade me that something's true,

  • when it actually isn't in reality?

  • (laughs)

  • See, it's much, much easier just to say,

  • are you having me on rather than

  • are you trying to persuade me something's true,

  • when it actually isn't reality?

  • (laughs)

  • Do you know I've only had one coffee today

  • and it's like 5:00pm?

  • Also, for those of you who don't know,

  • I spend a lot of my time on a farm,

  • and I'm filming in a barn right now,

  • and I think something's going on

  • with some sort of animal poo outside,

  • and there are flies everywhere!

  • (laughs)

  • So if you see any,

  • it's not me, it's the farm.

  • Now, the next one,

  • we're still talking about laughing and joking.

  • This one is a lovely one.

  • This one is to have the last laugh,

  • and this is such a satisfying feeling

  • to have the last laugh.

  • To have the last laugh

  • means to finally be more successful

  • than somebody else who was unpleasant to you.

  • So it means to finally be more successful

  • than somebody else who was unpleasant to you.

  • I'll give you an example of this.

  • Anna, I've got English like a native on the brain.

  • Anna was bullied for being a nerd at school,

  • but she had the last laugh

  • when she got the highest grades in the year.

  • Obviously, these other people were nasty to Anna.

  • This isn't true by the way, I've made it up.

  • The other people were nasty to Anna,

  • but she had the last laugh,

  • because she got the highest grades in the school.

  • She was more successful

  • than those other people who were unpleasant to her.

  • Totally fake.

  • I'm sure she was very successful at school.

  • She's a very intelligent woman,

  • but I've just,

  • I've made it up.

  • Number four, to have a sweet tooth.

  • Now I'd really like to know if this one

  • translates into your language at all,

  • because I can't remember if it is in Spanish.

  • I don't know if it translates.

  • Let me know,

  • obviously which language you speak,

  • and if it's the same in your language,

  • or if there's a slight variation,

  • but in English,

  • to have a sweet tooth means to be a big,

  • big fan of sweet foods.

  • So the person with the biggest sweet tooth

  • that I know is my grandma, my mom's mom.

  • She loves

  • sweet foods

  • and anything sugary.

  • You can see it in her face when she sees them.

  • She's really, really excited about it.

  • So yes, my lovely grandma has a sweet tooth.

  • But yeah, comment down below.

  • Let me know.

  • I love hearing about similarities between languages.

  • On one of my previous videos,

  • which I'll put up there in the card,

  • to hit two birds with one stone,

  • so many of you came back

  • and you told me so many different things,

  • and it turns out that it's a phrase

  • that is quite common in many different languages,

  • but with slight variations,

  • so thank you everyone who got involved in that.

  • Now number five,

  • this is a phrase that my mom

  • used to say to me when I was a child,

  • and I always knew that I had done something wrong.

  • This is to have a bone to pick with someone.

  • So to have a bone to pick with someone.

  • My mom always used to say, Lucy,

  • I have a bone to pick with you.

  • Oh no, if she's watching now,

  • she'll be laughing 'cause she knows

  • exactly how she says it.

  • Lucy, I have a bone to pick with you,

  • and basically,

  • when somebody has a bone to pick with someone,

  • it means that they have a problem or issue

  • that they want to discuss with that person.

  • So it would normally be

  • because I hadn't kept my bedroom tidy and organised.

  • This was a problem for my mom,

  • and she wanted to talk to me about it.

  • Lucy, I have a bone to pick with you.

  • It's quite a nice diplomatic way,

  • in my opinion,

  • to confront an issue with someone,

  • instead of saying,

  • I want to talk to you about a problem.

  • I have a bone to pick with you.

  • I think it's a bit nicer, but softer.

  • Now number six,

  • is it number six?

  • Yeah, it's number six.

  • Number six,

  • is something that I actually had myself

  • in 2015,

  • late 2015.

  • It is to have a change of heart,

  • and if you have a change of heart,

  • it means that you change your attitude,

  • or your opinion about something,

  • normally a long-standing opinion

  • or attitude about something.

  • Usually, it's a change

  • from a negative point to a positive one,

  • but it's all relative.

  • My change of heart

  • was that I thought I wanted to work in marketing.

  • My dream was actually to work in L'Oreal.

  • I really, really,

  • really, really wanted to work

  • in the marketing department of L'Oreal.

  • For some reason, I had it in my head,

  • but suddenly,

  • I had a change of heart.

  • I realised that I wanted to continue teaching,

  • and more than that,

  • I wanted to start teaching on YouTube.

  • I didn't think it was going to be a career,

  • but I definitely knew that this connection

  • I had with teaching,

  • and the connection with the English language,

  • was more important to me than a typical marketing career.

  • So I had this big change of heart.

  • I had worked for four years to achieve my degree.

  • All I thought about was marketing,

  • and suddenly my attitude changed.

  • I had a change of heart.

  • Number seven is to have a crack at something.

  • To have a crack at something.

  • To have a crack at something.

  • Distracted by the beautiful sounds of English.

  • So to have a crack at something is to try something,

  • or to try to do something,

  • or to have a turn at doing something.

  • So for example,

  • maybe there's a really hard,

  • I always struggle with this.

  • You know like a jar

  • of pasta sauce or gherkins?

  • I love gherkins,

  • pickles in America.

  • Especially the ones

  • from the Polish section in the supermarket.

  • They are better than the English gherkins.

  • Anyway, I digress.

  • The jar,

  • the lid is really, really tight,

  • and you always go and ask a man in the house to open it,

  • and they're trying,

  • and they're trying,

  • and then I think,

  • oh, let me have a crack at it.

  • Let me attempt.

  • It's my turn,

  • and I do it,

  • and sometimes,

  • sometimes I manage it.

  • But that's to have a crack at something.

  • It is to try and do something,

  • or to have a turn at trying to do something.

  • So you could use it in a situation like,

  • you know, would you mind taking my picture?

  • It's a common tourist situation,

  • and you can say,

  • I'll have a crack at it.

  • I'll give it a go.

  • I'll try.

  • So yes, that's a lovely phrase for you guys to use.

  • Now number eight,

  • number eight is a romantic one.

  • This is to have a crush on someone.

  • To have a crush on someone.

  • So if you have a crush on someone,

  • it means you fancy them.

  • You really quite like them,

  • in a romantic sort of way.

  • So I for a very, very long time,

  • had a crush on Chris Pratt.

  • I'm not sure if you know who he is.

  • He's a very, very funny American actor,

  • and when I saw him in Jurassic Park,

  • I had a,