Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Translator: Joseph Geni Reviewer: Thu-Huong Ha

  • (Hammer)

  • (Laughter)

  • (Microwave beeps) (Laughter)

  • You probably all agree with me

  • that this is a very nice road.

  • It's made of asphalt,

  • and asphalt is a very nice material to drive on,

  • but not always, especially not on these days as today,

  • when it's raining a lot.

  • Then you can have a lot of splash water in the asphalt.

  • And especially if you then ride with your bicycle,

  • and pass these cars, then that's not very nice.

  • Also, asphalt can create a lot of noise.

  • It's a noisy material,

  • and if we produce roads like in the Netherlands,

  • very close to cities, then we would like a silent road.

  • The solution for that is to make roads

  • out of porous asphalt.

  • Porous asphalt, a material that we use now

  • in most of the highways in the Netherlands,

  • it has pores and water can just rain through it,

  • so all the rainwater will flow away to the sides,

  • and you have a road that's easy to drive on,

  • so no splash water anymore.

  • Also the noise will disappear in these pores.

  • Because it's very hollow, all the noise will disappear,

  • so it's a very silent road.

  • It also has disadvantages, of course,

  • and the disadvantage of this road is that raveling can occur.

  • What is raveling? You see that in this road

  • that the stones at the surface come off.

  • First you get one stone, then several more,

  • and more and more and more and more,

  • and then they -- well, I will not do that. (Laughter)

  • But they can damage your windshield,

  • so you're not happy with that.

  • And finally, this raveling can also lead to more and more damage.

  • Sometimes you can create potholes with that.

  • Ha. He's ready.

  • Potholes, of course, that can become a problem,

  • but we have a solution.

  • Here you see actually how the damage appears in this material.

  • It's a porous asphalt, like I said, so you have only

  • a small amount of binder between the stones.

  • Due to weathering, due to U.V. light, due to oxidation,

  • this binder, this bitumen,

  • the glue between the aggregates is going to shrink,

  • and if it shrinks, it gets micro-cracks,

  • and it delaminates from the aggregates.

  • Then if you drive over the road, you take out the aggregates --

  • what we just saw here.

  • To solve this problem, we thought of self-healing materials.

  • If we can make this material self-healing,

  • then probably we have a solution.

  • So what we can do is use steel wool just to clean pans,

  • and the steel wool we can cut in very small pieces,

  • and these very small pieces we can mix to the bitumen.

  • So then you have asphalt

  • with very small pieces of steel wool in it.

  • Then you need a machine, like you see here,

  • that you can use for cooking -- an induction machine.

  • Induction can heat, especially steel; it's very good at that.

  • Then what you do is you heat up the steel,

  • you melt the bitumen,

  • and the bitumen will flow into these micro-cracks,

  • and the stones are again fixed to the surface.

  • Today I use a microwave because I cannot take

  • the big induction machine here onstage.

  • So a microwave is a similar system.

  • So I put the specimen in, which I'm now going to take out

  • to see what happened.

  • So this is the specimen coming out now.

  • So I said we have such an industrial machine in the lab

  • to heat up the specimens.

  • We tested a lot of specimens there,

  • and then the government, they actually saw our results,

  • and they thought, "Well, that's very interesting. We have to try that."

  • So they donated to us a piece of highway,

  • 400 meters of the A58, where we had to make

  • a test track to test this material.

  • So that's what we did here. You see where we were making the test road,

  • and then of course this road will last several years

  • without any damage. That's what we know from practice.

  • So we took a lot of samples from this road

  • and we tested them in the lab.

  • So we did aging on the samples,

  • did a lot of loading on it, healed them with our induction machine,

  • and healed them and tested them again.

  • Several times we can repeat that.

  • So actually, the conclusion from this research is that

  • if we go on the road every four years

  • with our healing machine -- this is the big version

  • we have made to go on the real road --

  • if we go on the road every four years

  • we can double the surface life of this road,

  • which of course saves a lot of money.

  • Well, to conclude, I can say

  • that we made a material

  • using steel fibers, the addition of steel fibers,

  • using induction energy to really

  • increase the surface life of the road,

  • double the surface life you can even do,

  • so it will really save a lot of money with very simple tricks.

  • And now you're of course curious if it also worked.

  • So we still have the specimen here. It's quite warm.

  • Actually, it still has to cool down first

  • before I can show you that the healing works.

  • But I will do a trial.

  • Let's see. Yeah, it worked.

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

Translator: Joseph Geni Reviewer: Thu-Huong Ha

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US TED asphalt road induction steel material

【TED】Erik Schlangen: A "self-healing" asphalt (Erik Schlangen: A "self-healing" asphalt)

  • 10 0
    Zenn posted on 2017/05/03
Video vocabulary