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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hi. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS. I`m Carl Azuz.

  • The U.S. Congress is back in session this Monday, September 9th,

  • its summer break is over and Senators and Representatives have a major vote facing them.

  • Should the U.S. launch a military strike against Syria?

  • The Obama administration believes Syria used illegal chemical weapons in its civil war.

  • He wants to punish Syria with a military strike.

  • President Obama is asking for Congress`s approval.

  • He`s planning to address the nation tomorrow night and hopes of winning public support.

  • But as of right now, he doesn`t have it.

  • A number of recent polls have found that most Americans don`t want the U.S. to attack Syria.

  • Regardless of how that turns out, Syria`s civil war has effected millions.

  • Dr. Sanjay Gupta takes us to where many Syrians have taken refuge.

  • DR. SANJAY GUPTA, CNN CORRESPONDENT: For Arkan Abdullah (ph), the constant shelling in Hams was becoming too much.

  • But it was after this occurred to her middle son,

  • Yousef (ph), she knew she had to leave.

  • It was an explosion, she told me, that led to these burns.

  • She packed up her three sons and what little she had and traveled to Alvares (ph) mostly by foot, to arrive here at this camp.

  • It`s one of the largest in Bekaa Valley along the Syrian-Lebanese border.

  • The youngest son, Alah (ph), is eight months old, and he`s now spent half his life as a refugee.

  • He`s severely malnourished, even though he is breastfed.

  • (on camera): How difficult is that to get food?

  • (voice over): It is tough to breastfeed, she tells me,

  • when the mom herself hasn`t had enough to east.

  • Today, they get drastically needed medical attention and vaccines from malaria and polio, thanks to UNICEF.

  • But make no mistake, Lebanon is buckling under the weight of the refugees who arrive here every 15 seconds.

  • In this country of over 4 million, the United Nations say there are some 720,000 registered refugees.

  • But doctors here believe the number to be more than twice that.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s very, very lot. Very lot.

  • "More than one out of every four people in Lebanon is a refugee, he tells me.

  • And it is the people living in these surrounding communities that are now sending a message to the refugees in this Valley Camps:

  • this will never be your home.

  • This can never be your home.

  • The children smiles belie a particularly awful way of life.

  • Their stories, one of fleeing the violence at their home country,

  • and then not being wanted in the adapted one.

  • After two years, there are no fixed facilities, or system of sanitation.

  • Instead, just a steady stream of sewage snaking its way through this 5,000 person camp.

  • They have lost everything.

  • Their material possessions, their dignity, their permanence.

  • To simply live like this,

  • aid groups say refugees at this camp are required to pay 100 U.S. dollars a month to the town sheriff,

  • and the only way to make it work, is to send these young kids into the fields to work for just $2 a day.

  • It is heart wrenching.

  • Within these camps, there is the constant friction between two groups,

  • those who support the Syrian regime, and those who hate it.

  • But they do share something in common:

  • they all want to go home.

  • Arkan and her three sons, they can`t wait to leave.

  • Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon.

  • AZUZ: There are a number of international organizations working to get help to these refugees,

  • they are offering cloth, blankets, medicine when needed.

  • CNN has put together a list of some of these aid groups.

  • If you`re looking to help and you need a place to start,

  • you can find a link to "Impact Your World" at cnnstudentnews.com.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The International Olympic Committee has the honor of announcing that the games of the 32 Olympiad in 2020 are awarded to the city of ...

  • Tokyo.

  • AZUZ: Congratulations to viewers in Japan, who are looking forward to hosting the Summer Olympics once again.

  • The last time, Tokyo did that, it was a 1964, the next time will be in 2020.

  • That gives you a sense of how far ahead the International Olympic Committee schedules the games to give host countries time to build and prepare.

  • Japan could use that time, it`s still recovering from a 2011 earthquake tsunami and nuclear plant meltdown.

  • Paula Hancocks explains how Tokyo beat out Istanbul and Madrid.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Tokyo!

  • PAULA HANCOCKS, CNN CORRESPONDENT: There were tears and there was gold tinsel.

  • Not bad for 5:20 on the Sunday morning.

  • Tokyo was the favorite and it didn`t disappoint.

  • Supporters were delighted the Olympic Games were returned to the city in 2020.

  • This boy shouts, "I`m so happy." His friend dabs (ph), "I knew we would win.

  • This girl says, many people understand the charm of Tokyo. It`s well known.

  • But this will make Tokyo even more popular.

  • Tokyo billed itself as a safe pair of hands in uncertain times.

  • Clearly, what the Olympic Committee wanted this time around.

  • And it doesn`t hurt when your prime minister was willing to leave a G20 meeting early to help wave the flag.

  • SHINZO ABE, JAPANESE PRIME MINISTER (through translator): The Olympic movement in Japan will be expanded to the rest of the world.

  • They expected that role to be played by Japan.

  • That`s why they supported us.

  • Safe and secured games to be staged by us.

  • HANCOCKS: Even concerns over a radiation spikes and fresh toxic water leaks at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, couldn`t derail this bid.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If I was (inaudible) these people, I think Tokyo and Japan is very dangerous,

  • but I`m Japanese, so I just believe.

  • HANCOCKS: It is a big win for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as his strong personal involvement has paid off.

  • Abe insists that Tokyo is safe.

  • Now, the Olympic Committee believes him.

  • Paula Hancocks, CNN, Tokyo.

  • AZUZ: If you were to drop between 70 and 100 and $50,000 on the luxury car,

  • you`d expect it to be pretty hot.

  • But after parking in the wrong space at the wrong time,

  • a man in London recently returned to find his Jaguar warped, scorched, literally melted in some spot by the sun.

  • Well, that and this -

  • it`s a skyscraper under construction, did I say skyscraper? More like a fry scraper? Oh, burn.

  • Anyway, the building`s developer promised to pay for the damage.

  • Jenny Harrison explains how this happened in the first place.

  • ENNY HARRISON, CNN CORRESPONDENT: There is the building, there is the sun, pretty big sun.

  • All the sun runs across coming down heating that building,

  • then, of course, they are rebounding off the building and coming down onto the ground or whatever is down below.

  • So, the sun is hitting the building at a different time of the day, in a different part of the building as well,

  • because of the position in the sky.

  • And, of course, as we know,

  • it`s been hitting these particular parking spots just for a very short, specified amount of time,

  • and also, it`s like it`s only last for two to three weeks.

  • AZUZ: When Florida A&M University has a football game to play,

  • there is something on the field this year that hasn`t been there for 21 months,

  • the marching band.

  • It hasn`t been allowed to perform publicly since 2011.

  • That November, FAMU`s drum major was beaten up on a bus after a football game.

  • It was part of a hazing ritual.

  • And 26-year old Robert Champion died within an hour of the beating.

  • The university`s band director and president resigned because of the investigation and 15 band members were arrested.

  • This year, the band isn`t as competitive or as large as it was before Champion was hazed.

  • It`s actually a third the size it used to be.

  • About 70 percent of the members are new, 30 percent marched in the previous life of the band.

  • Their first game back included a moment of silence for victims of hazing.

  • School has a lot more safeguards in place to discourage any form of hazing, and it gives students easy ways to report it.

  • The Marching 100 band, like the university, it taking steps to rebuild its image and start things off on a better note.

  • Now, for the CNN STUDENT NEWS Roll Call.

  • Look at some of the folks watching our show.

  • First, it`s East Hamilton Middle High School in Ultiva (ph), Tennessee,

  • the Ibus (ph) and the Hurricane (ph) are keeping an eye on us.

  • Let`s go to Washington.

  • Grandview High School, can`t outrun the eyes of Gunner (ph) the Greyhound.

  • And while you might not expect to find gators in Pittsburgh, you will at St. Gabriel`s.

  • Glad to have you all watching.

  • Cheetahs.

  • The fastest mammals on land.

  • Capable of going from zero to 60 in three seconds.

  • On the way to a top speed of over 70 miles per hour, is the rundown their pray.

  • But these two just want to snuggle.

  • They are the latest additions to the Dallas zoo and they`ll have a job to do besides look - cute -

  • they are part of the program to help raise awareness about endangered cheetahs and what`s being done to keep them around.

  • These two are the pick of the litter, and we`re not kitten around.

  • Two consecutive days of cat puns, they have left us feline less creative,

  • but we`ll cat to the chase with more news and puns tom-meow-row, see you then.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hi. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS. I`m Carl Azuz.

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