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  • (Music)

  • (Music ends)

  • (Applause)

  • Thank you!

  • (Applause continues)

  • Thank you very much.

  • Like the speaker before me -- I am a TED virgin, I guess.

  • I'm also the first time here, and ...

  • (Laughter)

  • I don't know what to say!

  • (Applause)

  • I'm really happy that Mr. Anderson invited me.

  • I'm really grateful that I get a chance to play for everyone.

  • And the song that I just played was by Josef Hofmann.

  • It's called "Kaleidoscope."

  • And Hofmann is a Polish pianist and composer of the late 19th century,

  • and he's widely considered one of the greatest pianists of all time.

  • I have another piece that I'd like to play for you.

  • It's called "Abegg Variations," by Robert Schumann,

  • a German 19th-century composer.

  • The name "Abegg" is actually A-B-E-G-G,

  • and that's the main theme in the melody.

  • (Plays the notes A, B, E, G and G)

  • That comes from the last name of one of Schumann's female friends.

  • (Laughter)

  • But he wrote that for his wife.

  • (Laughter)

  • So actually, if you listen carefully,

  • there are supposed to be five variations on this Abegg theme.

  • It's written around 1834,

  • so even though it's old, I hope you'll like it.

  • (Music)

  • (Music ends)

  • (Applause)

  • Now comes the part that I hate.

  • Well, because Mr. Anderson told me

  • that this session is called "Sync and Flow,"

  • I was wondering, "What do I know that these geniuses don't?"

  • (Laughter)

  • So, I'll talk about musical composition,

  • even though I don't know where to start.

  • How do I compose?

  • I think Yamaha does a really good job of teaching us how to compose.

  • What I do first is, I make a lot of little musical ideas

  • you can just improvise here at the piano --

  • and I choose one of those to become my main theme, my main melody,

  • like the Abegg that you just heard.

  • And once I choose my main theme, I have to decide:

  • Out of all the styles in music, what kind of style do I want?

  • And this year, I composed a Romantic style.

  • So for inspiration, I listened to Liszt and Tchaikovsky

  • and all the great Romantic composers.

  • Next, I make the structure of the entire piece with my teachers.

  • They help me plan out the whole piece.

  • And then the hard part is filling it in with musical ideas,

  • because then you have to think.

  • (Laughter)

  • And then, when the piece takes somewhat of a solified form --

  • solidified, excuse me -- solidified form,

  • you're supposed to actually polish the piece, polish the details,

  • and then polish the overall performance of the composition.

  • And another thing that I enjoy doing is drawing.

  • Drawing, because I like to draw, you know, Japanese anime art.

  • I think that's a craze among teens right now.

  • And once I realized it,

  • there's a parallel between creating music and creating art,

  • because for your motive, or your little initial idea for your drawing,

  • it's your character -- you want to decide who you want to draw,

  • or if you want to draw an original character.

  • And then you want to decide: How are you going to draw the character?

  • Like, am I going to use one page? Am I going to draw it on the computer?

  • Am I going to use a two-page spread like a comic book?

  • For a more grandiose effect, I guess.

  • And then you have to do the initial sketch of the character,

  • which is like your structure of a piece,

  • and then you add pen and pencil, and whatever details that you need --

  • that's polishing the drawing.

  • And another thing that both of these have in common is your state of mind,

  • because I know I'm one of those teenagers that are really easily distracted.

  • So if I'm trying to do homework and I don't feel like it,

  • I'll try to draw or, you know, waste my time.

  • And then what happens is, sometimes I absolutely can't draw

  • or I can't compose at all,

  • and then it's like there's too much on your mind.

  • You can't focus on what you're supposed to do.

  • And sometimes, if you manage to use your time wisely and work on it,

  • you'll get something out of it, but it doesn't come naturally.

  • What happens is, if something magical happens,

  • if something natural happens to you,

  • you're able to produce all this beautiful stuff instantly,

  • and then that's what I consider "flow,"

  • because that's when everything clicks and you're able to do anything.

  • You feel like you're on top of your game and you can do anything you want.

  • I'm not going to play my own composition today because,

  • although I did finish it, it's way too long.

  • Instead, I'd like to try something called "improvisation."

  • I have here seven note cards,

  • one with each note of the musical alphabet.

  • And I'd like someone to come up here and choose five --

  • anyone to come up here and choose five --

  • and then I can make it into some sort of melody,

  • and I'll improvise it.

  • Wow. A volunteer, yay!

  • (Laughter)

  • (Applause)

  • Jennifer Lin: Nice to meet you.

  • Goldie Hawn: Thank you. Choose five?

  • JL: Yes, five cards. Any five cards.

  • GH: OK, one. JL: OK.

  • GH: Two. JL: Yes.

  • GH: Three.

  • GH: Oh, D and F -- too familiar.

  • (Laughter)

  • JL: One more. GH: OK. "E" for "effort."

  • JL: Would you mind reading them out in the order that you chose them?

  • GH: OK -- C, G, B, A and E.

  • JL: Thank you very much!

  • GH: You're welcome. And what about these?

  • JL: I won't use them. Thank you!

  • (Applause)

  • Now, she chose C, G, B, A, E.

  • I'm going to try to put that in some sort of order.

  • (Plays notes)

  • OK, that's nice.

  • So, I'm going to have a moment to think,

  • and I'll try to make something out of it.

  • (Plays the five notes)

  • (Music)

  • (Music ends)

  • (Applause)

  • The next song, or the encore that I'm going to play

  • is called "Bumble Boogie," by Jack Fina.

  • (Applause)

  • (Music)

  • (Music ends)

  • (Applause)

(Music)

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【TED】Jennifer Lin: Improvising on piano, aged 14 (Jennifer Lin: Improvising on piano, aged 14)

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    Zenn posted on 2017/11/10
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