Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: It`s a new day, a new week, and for some of you, a new school year.

  • Welcome. And thank you for starting it with CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • First up today, we`re talking about the Middle Eastern nation of Syria.

  • Its president, Bashar al-Assad, says the Middle East will explode if Syria is attacked.

  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says samples from inside Syria tested positive for signatures of Sarin gas,

  • that`s a chemical weapon.

  • The U.S. has considered taking action against Syria and moved warships into the area near the country.

  • Congress has the power to declare war, but the president can order a military strike.

  • Jim Acosta reports on "What`s Going On."

  • JIM ACOSTA, CNN CORRESPONDENT: In a city that feasts on political theater, it was high drama just passed high noon,

  • as President Obama told the world he had pulled back from the brink of a military strike against Syria.

  • BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: I will seek authorization for the use of force

  • from the American people`s representatives in Congress.

  • ACOSTA: Aides to the president say Mr. Obama decided to go in a different direction at almost a last minute.

  • An approximately 6 P.M. Friday, the president made the stunning change in plans to seek congressional authorization.

  • JOHN KERRY, SECRETARY OF STATE: The question is what are we, we collectively, what are we in the world are going to do about it?

  • ACOSTA: Just hours before the president`s abrupt move, Secretary Kerry had made a passionate case for urgent action,

  • but aides say what Kerry and the rest of the president`s team didn`t know, is that Mr. Obama had been privately kicking around the idea of seeking approval from Congress for days,

  • as Kerry was turning up the heat, the president seemed to be turning it down.

  • OBAMA: I`m very clear that the world generally is war-weary, certainly the United States has gone through over a decade of war.

  • The American people understandably want us to be focused on

  • the business of rebuilding our economy here and putting people back to work.

  • And I assure you nobody ends up being more war-weary than me.

  • ACOSTA: The debate that counts is the one to come.

  • In Congress, where lawmakers from both parties still have questions.

  • SEN. TED CRUZ, (R ) TEXAS: In my view, U.S. military forces justified only to protect the vital national security interest of the United States.

  • And to date, the administration has not focused on those interests.

  • REP. CHARLES RANGEL, (D) NEW YORK: I don`t see where America is threatened.

  • I don`t see where our national security is threatened.

  • And perhaps, between now and the time we get back in September, 9,

  • the president will have information that would allow the Congress to effectively see where this danger is.

  • ACOSTA: Administration officials say the president still reserves the right to take military action as one top official put it,

  • the commander-in- chief still has the authority to act, even if Congress says no.

  • AZUZ: Officials in Japan reported jumping radiation levels at the Fukushima Nuclear Power plant.

  • It had a meltdown after an earthquake and tsunami struck in 2011.

  • These measurements were taken in pipes and containers holding contaminated water.

  • Radiation is the flow of atomic particles and waves,

  • it`s measured in the unit called milliSieverts.

  • In an industrialized nation, like the U.S. or Japan,

  • people are naturally exposed to about 3 milliSieverts per year.

  • The highest reading at one of these tanks, 1800 milliSieverts per hour.

  • High doses of radiation can lead to a wide array of health problems.

  • They can potentially be deadly.

  • The company that owns the Fukushima Plant says it`s confident that it can keep workers safe while they deal with the problem.

  • Radiation can also spread.

  • This animation shows how radiation from Fukushima makes its way across the Pacific Ocean.

  • Experts say, the contamination is reduced, though, as it spreads out across the water.

  • The first time Diana Nyad tried to swim from Cuba to Florida, she had to stop because of rough waters.

  • That was in 1978, when she was 29 years old.

  • On Saturday, the 64- year old jumped into the water for her fifth attempt.

  • On past swims, Nyad ran in the problems with jellyfish, severe stings cut her third an fourth attempts short.

  • This time, Nyad wore a special suite and mask for protection.

  • The path from Havana to Key West was around 100 miles.

  • It was estimated that Nyad would take about 80 hours to make it,

  • she did it in 53, walking onto the beach Monday afternoon.

  • Diana Nyad is the first person ever to swim from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage.

  • DIANA NYAD, ENDURANCE SWIMMER: All those life lessons that came up during the swim, you can dream at any age.

  • You should dream big.

  • The bigger you dream, it doesn`t matter if you fail.

  • I don`t want to be timid.

  • I don`t want to go home and say, well, I tried that Cuba thing so many times, but,

  • you know, it was just too tough for me.

  • I want to be in the ring,

  • fail or not fail and be bold and go for it.

  • AZUZ: We got a new segment this year.

  • To CNN STUDENT NEWS "Roll Call",

  • it`s how schools can get mentioned on our show.

  • Now, there are two ways for you to make the request:

  • one, if you are on social media,

  • go to Facebook.com/cnnstudentnews or tweet us @cnnstudentnews.

  • Please, include your school name, mascot, city and state.

  • The second way: you could send us an email from our Website, that`s cnnstudentnews.com.

  • Also, including your school name, mascot, city and state.

  • And please, just let us know you like to be part of the CNN STUDENT NEWS "Roll Call."

  • One big rule here: you have to either be a teacher or a student who is at least 13 to request a mention.

  • We hope to hear your school on the CNN STUDENT NEWS "Roll Call".

  • That`s how you do it: who made the roll call today, we`re going to our map.

  • Starting out west in Hemet, California with the bulldogs from Hemet High School.

  • Next up, show me the show me state,

  • and show me Raytownk, Missouri, home of the Raytown Blue Jays.

  • And the Pilots from Fulton County High in (inaudible), Kentucky, anchor today`s CNN STUDENT NEWS "Roll Call".

  • See if you can I.D. me.

  • I`m the world`s largest island,

  • geographically, I`m considered to be in North America,

  • but I`m officially part of the kingdom of Denmark.

  • More than 80 percent of my lands are covered in ice.

  • I`m Greenland.

  • And the ice on my surface, on average, is 5,000 feet thick.

  • So, it`s not so green of a land,

  • but after using radar to virtually peel back Greenland`s ice sheet,

  • British and American scientists say they found a frozen secret:

  • a mega-canyon, a giant gouge through Greenland surface that`s 50 percent longer than Arizona`s Grand Canyon,

  • though not as deep overall.

  • It runs from the middle of the country to its northern shore in the Arctic Ocean.

  • It was detected by aircraft,

  • because satellites are too far up to see through Greenland`s ice sheet.

  • Scientists believe the canyon was carved by a river before ice covered it all up.

  • Is this the greatest find ever?

  • No. Is it a scientific research priority?

  • Not really, but one researcher said it will help scientists understand how ice ebbs and flows across Greenland and other frozen environments.

  • In the last year or so, you might have noticed a change in your school`s cafeteria,

  • what where supposed to be healthier lunches.

  • Part of the national school lunch program.

  • Around 100,000 schools signed up, but now, some are dropping out.

  • Elizabeth Cohen examines why.

  • ELIZABETH COHEN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: The nation`s new healthier school lunches championed by first lady Michelle Obama are packed with more fruits and vegetables,

  • but they are getting a failing grade from some students.

  • Several school districts are dropping out of the government subsidized lunch program after just one year,

  • because they say students are rejecting the healthier fare.

  • TERESA THAYER SNYDER, SUPERINTENDENT: The children didn`t have options, they had to take what was there, and it`s not what they wanted to eat.

  • So, frequently, they stopped buying lunch from us.

  • COHEN: In Upstate New York, the Voorheesville School District says it lost $30,000 in three months.

  • SNYDER: It began to be not cost-effective for us to continue in that program.

  • COHEN: Across the nation, some kids say calorie limits are too harsh, many of them bringing food from home.

  • High school students in Kansas made this Youtube video, complete with faint fainting.

  • Federal health officials say the vast majority of schools are meeting the new guidelines, which set limits on calories, salt and fat.

  • And in the statement they said,

  • "We also encourage the very few eligible school districts that have chosen not to participate in the program,

  • to take steps to ensure all children will still have access to healthy, affordable meals during the school day."

  • The schools that have dropped out say their lunches are healthy.

  • SNYDER: We feel we have attracted back many students who had stopped buying lunches,

  • and we have many students excited about eating at school.

  • COHEN: Elizabeth Cohen, CNN reporting.

  • AZUZ: You think treehouses are just for kids?

  • Think again.

  • Do you think bicycles only work on the ground?

  • Think again.

  • You think ladders are the only way to getting to a treehouse?

  • You think we`ve run that idea into the ground? Yep.

  • The idea in this Youtube video is going in the opposite direction.

  • The inventor came up with a bicycle elevator because he said he was getting sick of going up and down the ladder.

  • It takes some nearly 30 feet to get up to the tree house,

  • or depending on how you look at it, just two feet.

  • Other way, the bicycle elevator idea is off the chain.

  • It might seem lighthearted on the way up,

  • but right back down bring some gravity to the situation.

  • Of course, you wanted to build one in the U.K., you`d need to ask for a lift.

  • Do you think it`s a wheely good idea for us to stop before you tire of our puns?

  • But we`ll be by tomorrow with more CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: It`s a new day, a new week, and for some of you, a new school year.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

September 3, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

  • 531 26
    VoiceTube posted on 2013/09/03
Video vocabulary