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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: In our last show of August, we`re talking economics, science and a couple of legal cases,

  • but we`re starting with the possibility of countries taking action against Syria.

  • Rather than acting on their own, nations are more likely to try to form a coalition and work together.

  • Several governments are building a case for a possible strike on Syria.

  • In the United Kingdom, British Prime Minister David Cameron says it`s highly likely that Syria`s government used chemical weapons.

  • But some members of parliament are unsure about approving military action.

  • DAVID CAMERON, BRITISH PRIME MINISTER: The question before the house today is how to respond to one of the most of horrid uses of chemical weapons in a century,

  • slaughtering innocent men, women and children in Syria.

  • It is not about taking sides in the Syrian conflict,

  • it is not about invading,

  • it is not about regime change,

  • or even working more closely with the opposition.

  • It is about the large scale use of chemical weapons and our response to a war crime, nothing else.

  • ED MILIBAND, LABOUR PARTY LEADER: The weapons inspectors are in the midst of their work, and will be reporting in the coming days.

  • That is why today couldn`t have been the day when the house was asked to decide on military action.

  • AUDIENCE: Yes.

  • MILIBAND: For this happen, is surely a basic point.

  • Evidence should precede decision, not decision precede evidence.

  • AZUZ: President Obama was planning to brief some members of the U.S. Congress yesterday on his plans regarding Syria.

  • Other lawmakers have signed the letter,

  • urging the president to lay out his case to the entire Congress and to the American people about whether the U.S. should get involved.

  • Teachers, for the latest developments on Syria, look for the link on the resources box at cnnstudentnews.com.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Is this legit?

  • The federal minimum wage in the U.S. is $7.25 per hour.

  • It`s true.

  • That means by federal law, most employees can`t be paid less than $7.25 an hour.

  • AZUZ: Some workers in the U.S. food industry are pushing to make more than the minimum wage.

  • Yesterday, they walked off the jobs to speak out about their demands.

  • Fast food workers in 60 cities went on strike yesterday.

  • The median pay for a fast food worker is just over $9 per hour.

  • That works out to $18.5 per year.

  • It`s higher than minimum wage, but below the poverty line for a family of four.

  • The workers are asking for a minimum of $15 per hour.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: These people that work at fast food restaurants should be able to afford basic living costs, like everyone else, who is working for the public.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I think people should have fair wages.

  • I`m not really sure what that would be,

  • but I mean I think it`s definitely something that should be brought up and they have reason for concern.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I don`t think it should be 15. At least like nine or ten, but not 15.

  • AZUZ: Fast food industry representatives say, if they raised employees` salaries, restaurants would probably have to raise their costs for the customers.

  • They might be forced to cut workers.

  • Legal fight between a different group of employees and employers could be over.

  • This one involves the National Football League.

  • Recently, the NFL has taken steps to try to decrease the chance of traumatic head injuries like concussions,

  • but a group of more than 4500 former players sued the league.

  • They accused the NFL of hiding evidence about the risks of head trauma for decades.

  • Yesterday, news broke that the league and retired players had reached a deal.

  • The NFL will pay $765 million towards things like medical exams and medical research for retired players.

  • A judge still needs to approve this agreement.

  • You`ve heard it many times before.

  • Don`t text and drive.

  • It`s illegal in 41 states.

  • Now, you might have to consider whether the person you`re texting is behind the wheel.

  • This goes back to an accident that happened in New Jersey.

  • A couple on a motorcycle both lost their legs when they were hit by a teenager who was texting while driving a pickup truck.

  • They sued him and his girlfriend, the person texting him, even though she wasn`t with them.

  • She said she was distracting him and therefore, she was partially responsible for the crash.

  • The couple settled with the driver.

  • They lost their initial lawsuit against his girlfriend.

  • But this week, a panel of judges sided with the couple.

  • The appeals court said that if the person sending text messages from somewhere else knows the recipient is driving,

  • then the sender can be held legally responsible for a potential accident.

  • Before there was storm trackers super viper Doppler weather XLT, there was the Farmer`s Almanac.

  • And though that might sound like comparing a Ferrari to a minivan,

  • the almanac certainly has an advantage and experience.

  • It`s been around for 197 years.

  • It`s also forecasting well ahead of your local weather man saying this winter is going to be cold,

  • piercing cold, bitterly cold, biting cold, cold in all caps.

  • You know that thing called the Super Bowl.

  • It`s going to be outdoors in New Jersey in February.

  • And the Farmer`s Almanac says it`s going to be -- guess what -- hit by a massive winter storm, give or take a day or two.

  • Whether or not you believe all of this, it`s certainly more than a five day forecast.

  • And the Almanac claims it`s accurate 80 percent of the time.

  • CNN affiliate WFAA fact checked out, at least for north Texas and they found that yeah, the Farmer`s Almanac was pretty darn accurate.

  • So, how does it work?

  • It uses a secret formula, like Coca Cola, or KFC, or Twinkies.

  • But the Almanac is based on mathematics, astronomy and tides,

  • which many modern meteorologists usually ignore.

  • I guess if we`re in the two thirds of the country that this forecast predicts will freeze,

  • the Almanac can at least say, we were warned.

  • For as long as there had been bicycles, there had been people falling off of them.

  • Sure, you can and should wear protective gear.

  • But how do you wear helmet and still avoid helmet hair?

  • Two designers in Sweden worked up an answer.

  • Wear the helmet around your neck until you need it.

  • Diana Magnay handles the explanation here.

  • DIANA MAGNAY, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Anna Halp (ph) and Theresa Alstein (ph) designed the device in 2005,

  • after Sweden introduced a law making it compulsory for children to wear helmets when cycling.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That triggered a great debate in Sweden and in the media on whether or not that law should be extended to adult cyclists as well.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We went out in the cities, asking people why they didn`t use traditional helmets.

  • And they said they weren`t -- they -- they felt geeky, they couldn`t -- they destroyed their hair,

  • they felt stupid and the cap couldn`t fit underneath.

  • And they wanted something that was very discreet, invisible if possible.

  • MAGNAY: The hood is made with ultra-strong nylon fabric.

  • It absorbs shock and covers a much larger area than a traditional cycle helmet.

  • Anna and Theresa reenacted thousands of cycling smashes using stunt riders and crash test dummies.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We have been developing the trigger mechanism for many years

  • in order to develop an algorithm or mathematical method

  • that can distinguish accidents movements within the cyclists from normal cycling.

  • MAGNAY: Hovding is on track to become a commercial success,

  • and it`s also already won the pair many accolades, including an Index award in 2011.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s -- it felt like we had won the Nobel Prize in design.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: To me design is about improving people`s lives.

  • MAGNAY: Well, I`ve enjoyed my ride minus the helmet hair, and nobody could argue with the device if it saves lives.

  • But at roughly ten times the cost of a regular bike helmet,

  • it does seem quite a high price for vanity.

  • Diana Magnay, CNN, Malmo, Sweden.

  • AZUZ: OK, today`s roll call filled with NASCAR to take us across land, air and sea, so let`s see who is watching CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • First up, we`ve got the Panthers at McKinley Senior High in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

  • Then we`re going to fly like an eagle to Commerce City, Colorado, home of the Eagle from Adams City High,

  • and the Beech High Buccaneers from Handersonville, Tennessee --

  • big thanks to all of you.

  • Now, it`s time for the roll call to set sail.

  • Four college students walked into a store recently.

  • The door was open and the lights were on.

  • So, why not?

  • It turns out, the store wasn`t supposed to be open -- the lock malfunctioned.

  • Students called out for a clerk, but no one answered, so they figured out how much their stuff cost, left the money counting out the change.

  • It was all captured on surveillance cameras.

  • Store manager says they are role models.

  • One of the students says he hopes it`s a lesson that you shouldn`t judge people.

  • Makes a lot of sense.

  • And thanks to this video, it`s an idea that could really register.

  • We`re talking about this on social media.

  • If you`re on Facebook, if you`re on Twitter, come find us and talk about it, too.

  • There will be no show on Monday because of Labor Day.

  • So, we hope you enjoy the long weekend.

  • We look forward to seeing you back here on Tuesday.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: In our last show of August, we`re talking economics, science and a couple of legal cases,

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