Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Welcome to Tuesday`s edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • I`m Carl Azuz, reporting from the CNN Center in Atlanta.

  • First thing we`re talking about today is a wildfire in California that`s chewed up about 150,000 acres.

  • That`s about the size of Chicago.

  • The Rim fire has become the 13th largest in California`s history.

  • VICKIE WRIGHT, U.S. FOREST SERVICE: It was astounding to see the power of what I witnessed earlier.

  • So our main objectives right now - structure protection,

  • just making sure that we keep everyone safe and we protect that park at all costs.

  • AZUZ: Vickie Wright was talking about Yosemite National Park, which has lost at least 12,000 acres to the fire.

  • But this thing is so massive, it`s also threatening some power and water supplies in San Francisco, more than 100 miles west of the park.

  • Thousands of firefighters have been going after this.

  • They`d had it 7 percent contained on Sunday.

  • It was 15 percent contained by last night.

  • That`s like saying it was 15 percent fenced in.

  • It will have to be 100 percent contained before it can potentially be considered controlled.

  • Yesterday, we also talked about Syria`s government offering access to inspectors from the United Nations.

  • The Syrian government and rebel forces, the two sides in Syria`s civil war, have accused each other of using chemical weapons.

  • U.N. inspectors are there to figure out if chemical weapons were used,

  • but not to determine who might have used them.

  • During their work yesterday, one of the inspectors` vehicle was hit by sniper fire.

  • No reports of injuries, and the United Nations did not say who might have been responsible for the shooting.

  • Despite that, the inspection team described Monday as a very productive day, and said it planned to keep working in Syria today.

  • That includes interviews with witnesses, doctors, and survivors.

  • The U.N. team also collects samples.

  • Experts say chemical traces can be found in survivors and plants for months after an attack takes place.

  • U.N.`s work can have an impact on whether or not other nations take action against Syria.

  • United Nations officials say the use of chemical weapons must be punished,

  • and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry agreed with that statement yesterday, saying there must be accountability.

  • When Ty Carter was a teenager, he didn`t have a lot of friends.

  • He joined the Marines, but was demoted and then discharged after a fight with a roommate.

  • But yesterday, the man who once described himself as not exactly hero material,

  • was awarded the nation`s highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor.

  • Carter enlisted in the Army in 2008 and received the medal for his actions in Afghanistan.

  • He was stationed at Combat Outpost Keating in 2009 when it was attacked by Taliban fighters.

  • During the battle, Carter, who is now a staff sergeant,

  • volunteered to cross through enemy fire multiple times to get supplies to other soldiers.

  • Since returning home, Staff Sergeant Carter has struggled with PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder.

  • He`s spoken openly about it as part of what he calls the invisible wounds of war.

  • During yesterday`s ceremony, President Obama praised Staff Sergeant Carter`s heroism,

  • and his efforts to raise awareness about the disorder.

  • BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: To any of our troops or veterans who are watching and struggling, look at this man.

  • Look at this soldier, look at this warrior.

  • He`s as tough as they come, and if he can find the courage and the strength

  • to not only seek help but also to speak out about it,

  • to take care of himself and to stay strong,

  • then so can you.

  • AZUZ: U.S. presidents keep a pretty full schedule.

  • For example, yesterday, in addition to the ceremony for Sergeant Carter,

  • President Obama had meetings with faith leaders and with the winners of a national debate tournament.

  • What if you could get on the president`s schedule?

  • If you had 5 minutes, what would you want to talk about?

  • That`s what we asked some high school juniors and seniors for this installment of the CNN STUDENT NEWS Viewfinder.

  • AMAYA CARR ,HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: His childhood, and how life is for him.

  • Because he all know he runs the world, but I really want to know how he feels,

  • if he has a diary, and like how is everyday life for him, and what stresses him out.

  • GRACE RYBACK, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: I`d definitely talk to him about how he deals with the pressure of everything that goes around him.

  • There`s pressure from everyone around him.

  • ROMA PARIKH, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: You know, it would be nice to get to know him on a personal level on a platform that isn`t I`m here, down below, and he`s up there on the stage.

  • But also I guess I`d like to talk about the political things and just how he views things himself, but not so much as the president.

  • MYKEL SKINNER, HIGH SCHOOL JUNIOR: I would more talk to him about himself, what makes him different, you know?

  • We all hear about politics and everything, but we really don`t know who Mr. Obama is,

  • and I`d like to get more in depth and see what makes him special.

  • GARLAND JONES, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: I am going to ask him a lot of basketball questions,

  • since he seems to be such an avid basketball player,

  • and find out why he doesn`t ever pick Duke for the final four.

  • MARILYN PRIMOVIC, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: I would bring up the whole debt situation,

  • because that`s going to affect our generation the most.

  • All the bills that are being passed are affecting - are going to affect the debt that our generation is going to have to find a way to pay off,

  • and I am concerned about how we`re going to do that.

  • NICK MUSEY, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: You know, just give me a 5-minute spiel on how you think you would use our generation to connect back to the global community,

  • because before, you know, in the `80s, in the `70s, we were number one in everything,

  • but now in 2013, in the 21st century, we have become detached from the world.

  • So I think, I want to know how he would use our generation to become more connected to the world again.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s time for the shoutout.

  • What famous composer wrote the musical work "Ode to Joy?"

  • If you think you know it, then shout it out.

  • Was it Bach, Mozart, Beethoven or Handel?

  • You`ve got 3 seconds, go.

  • This is "Ode to Joy," and it`s part of Beethoven`s 9th Symphony.

  • That is your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • AZUZ: By the time Beethoven composed the 9th Symphony, he had become deaf.

  • Stories say he sawed the legs off his piano so he could feel the vibrations of the different notes through the floor.

  • Robbie Wilde does not play the piano.

  • He makes music in a similar way, using senses other than his hearing,

  • and as Sarah Hoye shows us, this DJ does not miss a beat.

  • SARAH HOYE, CNN CORRESPONDENT: It`s New York Fashion Week,

  • and DJ Robbie Wilde is busy working the exclusive Project Runway designer reunion party.

  • Wilde lives in the world of rhythm and bass.

  • He just can`t hear it.

  • Ear infections as a child left Wilde completely deaf in his right ear,

  • and with only 20 percent hearing in his left.

  • Did you ever feel sorry for yourself?

  • ROBBIE WILDE, DJ: Never, no. Sometimes I would even forget sometimes myself.

  • HOYE: Although hearing is the most important sense in a DJ`s life,

  • Wilde was determined to make it.

  • He got his first shot to perform at his father`s restaurant nearly a decade ago.

  • And hasn`t looked back since.

  • WILDE: I still consider it as a hobby. I really do love it. Like, I don`t see it as a job, you know?

  • And that`s the best part, if you love something, you don`t consider it as a job,

  • you know, you are happy to go to work.

  • HOYE: Wild went to DJ school to learn the art of turntablism.

  • And also relies on his computer to see the music and feels the vibration, relatively.

  • He`s dubbed "that deaf DJ" by club goers and promoters,

  • and it`s a moniker even he uses,

  • but Wilde says it`s more than just about his deafness.

  • WILDE: I don`t want you to see me as a deaf DJ or a deaf kid trying to DJ.

  • I want you to see me as a great DJ that happens to be deaf, you know?

  • Because I don`t want sympathy. I don`t want, oh, let`s give him a gig because, you know, he`s hearing impaired.

  • HOYE: His skills got noticed by HP and earned him a spot on the commercial,

  • thrusting him onto the world stage.

  • WILDE: It does not matter that I can`t hear the music.

  • DANIELLE JONES, HEWLETT PACKARD: That he`s doing it through touch, without being able to hear the music, is a wonderful story.

  • HOYE: Besides, some things are better left unheard, he says.

  • WILDE: There is a lot of sounds out in the world you don`t want to hear.

  • I like it muffled.

  • It`s, you know, I like who I am, I`m proud of who I am.

  • HOYE: When he`s not DJ`ing, Wilde is in the studio producing music.

  • What is your message for those who are trying to chase a dream just like you?

  • WILDE: Honestly, never give up.

  • HOYE: Sarah Hoye, CNN, New York.

  • AZUZ: Lions and Tigers and Bears, oh my.

  • It`s time for the CNN STUDENT NEWS roll call.

  • Where are we heading first?

  • Lafayette, Louisiana.

  • Home of the Lions from Lafayette High.

  • Home of the Lions from Lafayette High.

  • Hope you`re having a great day there.

  • Then it`s up to Konawa high school in Konawa, Oklahoma.

  • The Tigers are watching CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • And our bears are Grizzlies, the Granger Grizzlies from Rutledge, Tennessee.

  • Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, roll call.

  • Colorado State University just wrapped up its welcome week for first-year students.

  • Definitely a warm welcome for this guy.

  • Three chances to make a half-court shot.

  • Only needed one.

  • So what did he win, besides a YouTube video and the apparent adulation of his fellow freshmen?

  • He got free tuition for a year.

  • So five seconds of work in exchange for an entire year`s college costs,

  • I`d say it was a pretty good net gain.

  • Only one student got a shot, so anyone else who was hoping for a chance at this year`s free ride was simply reduced tuition.

  • It`s going to wrap things up for today.

  • For CNN STUDENT NEWS, I`m Carl Azuz.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Welcome to Tuesday`s edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

August 27, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

  • 443 14
    VoiceTube posted on 2013/08/28
Video vocabulary