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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • SPEAKER 1: Thank you all for coming.

  • I'm thrilled to be welcoming Kelly LeVeque to Google

  • today to talk about her wellness approach and her new book "Body

  • Love."

  • So Kelly, if you don't know, is a wellness expert,

  • nutritionist.

  • You have from many certifications--

  • KELLY LEVEQUE: Too many.

  • SPEAKER 1: --under your belt. But I really

  • connected when I learned about Kelly

  • with her scientific approach to health and wellness

  • and nutrition, and just found it really fascinating.

  • And kind of for me-- cut through a lot

  • of the clutter that's out there and just confusion

  • around what advice to listen to-- so super excited

  • to have her here.

  • And just to kick off, Kelly, you have a really unique approach.

  • And you love using scientific studies,

  • evidence-based nutrition.

  • So can you tell us a bit about how you developed that strategy

  • and what led you to your overall nutrition philosophy?

  • KELLY LEVEQUE: Sure, so I'd have to take you guys all back

  • to the beginning of my career.

  • I had an eight year career in cancer and genetics

  • where my job everyday was to read studies and determine

  • if they were biased or unbiased, if they had

  • significant p-values like how many people were involved

  • in this study.

  • Who was funding it?

  • What was the goal?

  • And was it correlation versus causation?

  • Which you find a lot in nutrition studies,

  • because if you think about it, it's

  • really hard to determine if an apple a day is good for you

  • if one person's eating cheeseburger,

  • another person's eating fries, and another person's

  • having a Fab Four smoothie instead.

  • But what it was for me was always a passion, always

  • something that I've loved.

  • So I've loved health and nutrition

  • since I was probably 13 or 14 years old.

  • I was that girl who read diet books in high school when--

  • I mean we joked about this when I got here--

  • when I was not allowed to watch "The Simpsons" or "90210."

  • But I was allowed to read those books.

  • And it was something that obviously was a hobby

  • and then became more.

  • Because what I was able to do once

  • I learned how to read those studies and go into--

  • you guys have Google Scholar, which I love.

  • It's a great place to find studies.

  • I can look up what I'm--

  • something that I'm searching for whether it's the benefits

  • of curcumin, which is the active ingredient in turmeric.

  • Or what's better, two meals a day or six?

  • There's a lot you can get from the research.

  • And understanding how to read the research

  • allowed me to just mine that nutrition knowledge and figure

  • out what I thought was the most important.

  • And what I kept finding was that there

  • were a lot of things that overlapped.

  • Whether you're eating a Mediterranean

  • diet, or an Atkins diet, or a paleo diet, or a Keto diet,

  • or your blood sugar balance, or you were Weight Watchers,

  • I kind of just didn't want the eat and do not eat list.

  • I just wanted to understand the science

  • and say, how am I going to feel my best.

  • How am I going to stay fueled?

  • How am I going to stop snacking on junk

  • when I wanted to reach for Goldfish?

  • I grew up on Goldfish.

  • Those are great.

  • But for me it was really trying to decipher what was

  • the most important thing here.

  • And that came down to what do your--

  • what do your cells need to proliferate?

  • Because your body is constantly breaking itself

  • down and rebuilding itself.

  • You rebuild your body about nine times over your life.

  • So I wanted to know what did my cells need.

  • And then what's going to make me feel my best

  • and perform and function my best?

  • And so that's kind of what led me to my philosophy, which

  • is a light structure around eating that isn't an eat

  • and do not eat list.

  • Because I think for a lot of people who decide,

  • oh, I'm never going to eat rice again, well, what

  • happens when you go on a trip with your husband

  • to Japan, like I just went.

  • Am I not going to have sushi?

  • Of course I'm going to have sushi.

  • But it's understanding well, what

  • do these macronutrients do?

  • How do they break down in my body?

  • How do they make me feel?

  • And making choices around food based on that knowledge--

  • so that's also kind of how it all happened.

  • SPEAKER 1: So coming out of learning all that research,

  • what are some of the biggest biological takeaways that you

  • want to communicate to men and women?

  • KELLY LEVEQUE: Sure, well a lot of you guys

  • got a copy of my book.

  • And I talk about something called the Fab Four,

  • which are, I think, the four categories that I think

  • are important for you to be aware of,

  • the first being protein, the second being fat,

  • the third being fiber, and the fourth being greens.

  • And by greens I mean vegetables like leafy greens, things

  • deep in color.

  • And the reason for that is that you

  • have essential amino acids, which are from protein,

  • that your body needs.

  • You have protein stores in your body

  • that are used to rebuild these cells that we break down.

  • The programmed cell death is apoptosis.

  • So if your body says, oh, this cell is not functioning right,

  • you'll kill it off.

  • You'll rebuild it.

  • And that's what I was talking about when

  • I said your body breaks itself down and rebuilds itself.

  • So you need protein to do that.

  • I don't by any means think that you need 200 grams a day.

  • If you're on a bodybuilding website,

  • that might be the recommendation,

  • but something around 20 to 30 grams at each meal.

  • And there are going to be meals where there are less.

  • And there are going to be meals where there are more--

  • but just to keep those stores up.

  • Fat-- I think fat is really important.

  • And I think there was a big period of time where

  • people ditched fat, because it's higher in calories per gram.

  • And if you're a calorie counter, that's

  • a really easy way to cut calories, right.

  • But when it comes to satiety and feeling full and calm,

  • which is so much about my philosophy--

  • I'm just all about eating food that turn off--

  • turns off hunger hormones so you don't have to think about food.

  • Fat is really good at doing that.

  • When you eat fat, your body releases

  • a hormone called cholecystokinin,

  • which is a really strong satiety hormone.

  • I mean think about it.

  • If you're going to have chicken and steamed

  • broccoli versus chicken, broccoli, and a pesto sauce,

  • I mean obviously you're going to feel a lot more satisfied when

  • you're adding fat to that.

  • And that's also going to slow the digestion of that meal

  • and elongate your blood sugar curve,

  • so we aren't reaching for snacks,

  • which is another thing that I like people to do--

  • is add to their plate instead of depriving themselves.

  • And things to make something last longer in your body.

  • And fat does a really good job of helping you absorb all

  • of your fat soluble vitamins.

  • There was a study that came out on avocados.

  • And by adding avocados to a salad,

  • you're actually increasing phytochemical absorption

  • by over 300%.

  • So when you think about those nutrients

  • that you're trying to get, those anti-oxidants

  • that are fighting the oxidative stress of day-to-day life,

  • you're not going to get there without the fat.

  • So I love fat.

  • And then fiber and greens comes down to your microbiome.

  • It comes down to detoxification.

  • It comes down to feeling full.

  • So the physical stretching of your stomach does something.

  • It helps your body with the hormone called ghrelin.

  • And ghrelin I like to think of the gorilla hormone.

  • If you don't have that physical stretch of your stomach,

  • you're going to be starving.

  • You just want to eat all day long just grabbing for another

  • leaf, but-- or hopefully a leaf--

  • sometimes not-- but the real stretching of your stomach.

  • So when we grab a green juice--

  • I know juicing became really popular.

  • Grabbing a green juice, you're not really turning off

  • that hunger hormone.

  • So you're going to be hungry later.

  • And then the greens, specifically leafy greens,

  • great source of fiber, great source of phytochemicals.

  • But also the source of a sugar, a sulfur-based sugar that

  • feeds your probiotic bacteria.

  • So when you think about all of the gut

  • bacteria in your body, 10 cells of bacteria

  • to every human cell on your body,

  • you want to make sure that that's proliferating

  • and that you're just really a walking around ecosystem

  • of bacteria that's giving off gases, free fatty

  • acids, and things that tell your genes what to do.

  • So for longevity purposes, detoxification purposes,

  • whenever you can say, I'll just add a cup of spinach

  • to that smoothie, or I'll get a side salad to start my meal,

  • I mean it's a great way to stay full.

  • It's a great way to get really good nutrients, too.

  • So those four things, I think, is my way

  • of helping people turn off hunger hormones

  • and elongate their blood sugar curve

  • and eat an anti-inflammatory diet.

  • So instead of just saying, oh, I can't have this anymore.

  • And I can't have that anymore.

  • And I'm not having gluten, or I'm not having dairy,

  • or I'm not--

  • it's a lot of "I'm not," which creates a lot of food drama.

  • I like to say, OK, look at my plate.

  • Do I have a good source of healthy fat?

  • Can I add olive oil or avocado to this?

  • Can I add slivered nuts to this so

  • that it will make me feel a little more full.

  • So that 3 o'clock doesn't roll around and I don't go, oh,

  • is it time for a brownie?

  • Because we're all going to get that depressed feeling around 3

  • or 4 o'clock where a coffee, a brownie,

  • a cookie sounds awesome, and that's a hormonal thing

  • that's happening inside of you.

  • It's also due to the fact that whatever you had at lunch,

  • your blood sugar can go up and come down on average

  • about three hours.

  • So depending on when you eat lunch between 12:00 and 1:00,

  • that crash is going to happen.

  • And if we can elongate that window,

  • you don't have that crash.

  • And we can be aware of the way that we're hormonally

  • going to react at that time.

  • We can have strategies to deal with it, move through it,

  • and hopefully continue to eat clean.

  • SPEAKER 1: Yeah, so what are your top tips then

  • for elongating that blood sugar curve.

  • You touched on your Fab Four items.

  • But how does that actually play out in our bodies?

  • KELLY LEVEQUE: Right, so if any one of you guys have heard--

  • for example, if you had a sweet potato, or you

  • had a sweet potato with coconut oil, or almond butter,

  • or grass-fed butter on it.

  • The actual adding of fat slows down

  • the digestion and breakdown of your food.

  • And when you add greens and fiber, the breaking-- your body

  • has to physically digest those things.

  • And your digestion happens with two chemical byproducts,

  • hydrochloric acid.

  • Which if you have acid reflux, that's that feeling, right.

  • That's the acid.

  • You want that acid.

  • It's really, really good.

  • Actually, a lot of time when people have acid reflux,

  • we're finding that they actually have not enough acid