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  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Welcome back.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We hope you had a . UNIDENTIFIED MALE: A great summer.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: A new season. UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Of CNN STUDENT NEWS starts right now.

  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: CNN STUDENT NEWS is back. I`m Carl Azuz. It`s great to be kicking off a new school with you.

  • We have, as you just saw, a new show beginning.

  • We`ve got some new segments, new graphics, and a new look here in the CNN International Newsroom at CNN Global Headquarters.

  • So we`re up and running. And so are some U.S. embassies after they were closed for a week. That`s our first story of this new school year.

  • There are 19 locations labeled on this map.

  • In countries across parts of Africa and around the Middle East, on August 4th, the U.S. closed its embassies in all of them.

  • Yesterday, it reopened 18 of them. Now, an embassy is a country`s official place for government business inside another country.

  • The people who work there like ambassadors interact with the local government and other groups.

  • And embassies have a special status.

  • An American embassy may be located outside the United States, but the facility is considered U.S. soil.

  • So, the questions: why did the U.S. closed these 19 embassies.

  • U.S. intelligence organizations intercepted some communications from the al Qaeda terrorists group.

  • That group is behind attacks around the globe including the 911 terrorist attacks in 2001.

  • This communication was a threatening message being sent between senior al Qaeda members.

  • U.S. officials responded by closing those embassies and issuing worldwide travel alert for Americans.

  • The one embassy that didn`t reopen yesterday is in Yemen. That country is home to al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.

  • U.S. officials kept this embassy closed because of continuing concerns about a possible attack.

  • One of the embassies that reopened was in Egypt.

  • That country`s been in the news a lot this summer for a different reason: the North African nation is going through a political crisis.

  • Protests, violence, a forced change in government, and it`s not over.

  • All this week, we`re going to be recapping some of the big stories that happen while we were off for the summer.

  • Today, we are looking at the tension in Egypt over the past few months.

  • Egypt has spent this summer in turmoil.

  • Images of civil unrest and violence are all over the news.

  • What`s behind it all - if you a regular STUDENT NEWS viewer, you may remember that in May and June of 2012 the country held elections and Mohamed Morsy became Egypt`s first democratically elected president.

  • Before Morsy, President Hosni Mubarak had ruled Egypt for almost 30 years. He was forced out of office in 2011.

  • But a year into his term, many Egyptians wanted Morsy out, too.

  • His party, the Muslim Brotherhood, is Egypt`s oldest and largest Muslim organization.

  • Its ideology is based on the teachings in the Koran, Islam`s holy book.

  • Some say, Morsy rushed adoption of a constitution that did not guarantee freedom of religion.

  • Some say he was trying to force the Muslim Brotherhood strict Islamic code into national laws.

  • And other Egyptians opposed Morsy because they saw no improvement to the struggling national economy and crime situation.

  • When Morsy issued an edict declaring that the country`s courts could not overturn his decisions, his opponents began taking to the streets again.

  • Eventually, the Egyptian military, which sided with the opposition, gave Morsy an ultimatum:

  • step aside or we will force you out. Morsy refused to go.

  • On July 3rd of this year, after days of angry protests, the military removed Morsy from office.

  • Although Egyptian military has a lot of influence in the government, it didn`t hold on to power.

  • Government control went to an interim civilian government led by Adly Mansour, who also leads the country`s supreme court.

  • The deposed Morsy is being held in an undisclosed military location.

  • He faces several criminal charges.

  • Since Morsy`s removal, there`ve been protests and sittings in support of him by the Muslim Brotherhood as well as protests supporting his ouster.

  • Those who support Morsy say he was legally elected and should remain as president.

  • They called his removal from power an illegal coup.

  • And they refused to accept it.

  • Those who support Morsy`s removal say it was a correction, a continuation of the revolution that started with Mubarak`s removal more than two years ago.

  • This months, President Obama sent Senators John McCain and Lindsay Graham to Egypt to try to talk to both sides, but the protests and violence continue.

  • In recent weeks, hundreds have been killed and thousand injured in Egypt and many worry about the long term survival of democracy in the country.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: See if you can I.D. me.

  • I`m a planet with two moons.

  • Their names come from Greek words, for "fear" and "terror."

  • A year for me lasts roughly 687 days.

  • I`m one of Earth`s closest neighbors.

  • I`m Mars, and depending on our orbits, I can be anywhere from 35 million to 250 million miles away from the Earth.

  • AZUZ: A trip to Mars wouldn`t exactly be a vacation. It would be a one way ticket.

  • Some people say they are ready to take it. And we`re not just talking about a handful of folks.

  • More than 100,000 people have applied to go.

  • We talked about this last school year, we`re going to back up and fill in a couple of details.

  • A project called Mars One is planning manned missions to the Red Planet.

  • The group wants to send its first four astronauts in 2022.

  • The idea would be to colonize Mars, taking supplies like food and solar panels and then using the local Martian environment to produce water and oxygen.

  • There are some downsides to consider.

  • Increased exposure to radiation in space and oh, year, that whole thing about how you could never come home again.

  • But with volunteers signing up, the Mars One project might, just might get off the ground.

  • We`re here at CNN STUDENT NEWS. We want to hear your views on different subjects.

  • And we`re going to be sharing them in the news segment called "CNN STUDENT NEWS Viewfunder."

  • For this first edition, we caught up with some rising juniors and seniors at a leadership conference in Georgia.

  • We asked what advice they have for high school freshmen. Check it out.

  • ROMA PARIKH, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: I would say, definitely take it seriously.

  • You know, you think freshman year is going to be the easiest year, and you don`t always think about that or care for your classes,

  • but I would definitely do it, because it`s just sets a good standard for the rest of the year, which will get harder.

  • MYKEL SKINNER, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: Freshman year, it is serious and it does count.

  • GARLAND JONES, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: Not slack off freshman year. They would need to take a good core schedule and to just enjoy their four years.

  • BENJAMIN GOLDFEIN, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: Not just stress out.

  • When I came in the high school, I was so stressed and so nervous, but it really isn`t that nerve-raking once you get the hang of things.

  • ROSHIN KOOPLICAT, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: Make sure to get good grades, it`s important, and just enjoy the experience.

  • MARILYN PRIMOVIC, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: That first semester start is where it all takes off. That`s where your GPA can skyrocket or it can tank.

  • GRACE RYBACK, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: Just focus on academics and keep a good balance between academics and a social life.

  • GORDON CLARK, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: Work for the future, but live for today.

  • Not get too caught up in the schoolwork, but still make sure you have a plan B. And don`t party too hard.

  • NICK MUSEY, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: You know, just never - never procrastinate, because I would procrastinate a lot.

  • I mean I would get the work done. But just - I have a lot of, you know, sleep was nice.

  • BROOKE JOHNSON, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: I say to make a lot of friends and maybe find someone who`s like in a leadership position that you know, will be a good role model.

  • AMAYA CARR, HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR: Schedule your time. It`s high school, yeah, it`s so fun,

  • but when that test is Thursday, and you study in fourth block Thursday morning, and the test is on fifth block, you have a problem.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Time for the first "Shout Out" of the school year.

  • Which of these sounds measures around 120 decibels?

  • If you think you know it, then shout it out!

  • Is it a vacuum cleaner, siren, alarm clock or whisper.

  • You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • Sirens like a fire engine or police car are around 120 decibels.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shout out.

  • AZUZ: So, imagine how loud a siren is and then consider that a group in Wisconsin was trying to hit that same decibel level. These guys were just animals.

  • Of course, they had to be, they were aiming to beat the world record for loudest bark by a group of dogs.

  • Topping that would be rough. Apparently, too rough.

  • The current record, 124 decibels, this canine competitors couldn`t quite crack 115.

  • But there is no need to bowwow their heads in shame. Organizers say, they are going to try again next year.

  • Well, finally, don`t think we`re forgetting our feline friends.

  • Maybe you`ve heard of a pool shark, this YouTube video features a pool cat.

  • Oh, if you have cat to be, kitten, meow.

  • It`s not necessarily a natural talent, but it`s good to see him stick with it, even though he might need some queues.

  • I`m just waiting for him to show his true stripes or solids.

  • I guess you could chalk his persistence up to his curious nature, better be careful up on that table, though.

  • There is a decent chance he might scratch. Afterwards, he probably felt really bad.

  • Either way, it`s claws for concern.

  • Oh yeah, the puns are back, too.

  • Speaking of which, it`s time for us to pause, but we`ll be back tomorrow with more CNN STUDENT NEWS, and we hope to see you then. Thanks for joining us.

  • END

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Welcome back.

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August 12, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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