Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • My name is Tom Chi.

  • I spent two years of my life

  • building the user experience team

  • for the Google X division of Google,

  • and it's a place I affectionately call

  • the Department of Science Fiction

  • because of the futuristic nature

  • of the types of projects we took on:

  • self-driving cars,

  • Google Glass,

  • and other things that you'll see soon enough.

  • So, for those who haven't heard of this project,

  • this is what Google Glass looks like.

  • It allows you to overlay digital things into your eye sight

  • while still maintaining being part of the world.

  • So, if I, you know, were to pull out my cell phone

  • and look into it, I'm basically out of this world now,

  • like, I'm in my own little cell phone-tablet world, what have you.

  • But, Google Glass has the vision of allowing us

  • to continue to be in the world

  • but also have access to the digital things that we need and love.

  • Now, I am going to ask you a real simple question about Google Glass:

  • how would you prototype this experience?

  • How long do you think it would take you

  • to make the first working version of the headset display?

  • Okay, a little bit on the long side.

  • The answer is one day.

  • And here's what it looked like.

  • So, basically the magic piece is the coat hanger.

  • The coat hanger, I bent it in a specific shape

  • and the top loop goes around your neck

  • and then the bottom loop rests against your chest

  • and it allows me to carry a piece of plexiglass

  • on with a little sheet protector.

  • So these are the things you put your book reports in

  • so they don't get wet,

  • I literally got at the drug store.

  • You know, have it out at the end of the plexiglass

  • and then it gets projected onto with the pico projector

  • that's connected to a Netbook.

  • And using this set-up, within one day

  • we're already able to start having the experience

  • of what it looks like to have digital things

  • overlaid on your physical world,

  • be able to move around with it,

  • and also use the Netbook to try out

  • tons and tons of different ideas around software.

  • Now, after you start getting something like that working,

  • you know, a really important problem comes up,

  • like you're wearing this thing on your head,

  • it's like a pair of glasses,

  • so you don't have a mouse or a keyboard or a touchscreen,

  • all the ways you are used to interacting with a machine.

  • So, we thought for a second,

  • well, maybe we could do something

  • like, you know, what was shown in Minority Report.

  • So, for folks who haven't seen that,

  • basically Tom Cruise is manipulating software

  • with his hands in front of his face

  • and photos are flying over here

  • and his email is over here

  • and so on and so forth.

  • So I'll ask the the same question again,

  • how long do you think it would take

  • to have the real experience of doing something like that?

  • Two years, OK.

  • Somebody said one day.

  • 45 minutes.

  • So here's how it looks.

  • So you wear the thing that we saw that first time

  • because you need some way to go project things,

  • but what happens is we got two hairbands,

  • which I think was the hardest part we had to do,

  • ask people for their hairbands.

  • But you put one hand in each hairband

  • and attach that hairband,

  • we tied a fishing line.

  • And the fishing line goes over the top of a whiteboard

  • and then goes down to this little assembly

  • that's taped to the floor.

  • And what this means is

  • every time I move my hand in any direction,

  • it adds tension to the line

  • and it does the following with the assembly on the floor.

  • So, the other end of the fishing wire is attached to a chopstick

  • and it's not because I'm Asian,

  • there's just a cafeteria nearby,

  • I don't just carry chopsticks on me.

  • But, I tied it to the end of a chopstick,

  • I clipped it into a binder clip,

  • and then put it over a pen,

  • and basically what happens then

  • is when you move your arm

  • and it produces tension on the wire,

  • the chopstick comes down like a lever

  • and clicks a presentation clicker,

  • one hand moves the presentation forward,

  • the other hand moves the presentation backwards.

  • So this was built in 45 minutes

  • and that meant shortly afterwards,

  • we were having experiences

  • like looking at an image gallery

  • and saying, "next image,

  • next image,

  • previous image,"

  • or looking at our emails and saying,

  • "let me click into this email,

  • let me click reply now."

  • And this was exactly the experience of what it was like

  • to go control software with your hands.

  • And ultimately, what it taught us is

  • we probably shouldn't have this in the product.

  • We learned a lot of things

  • about the social awkwardness of it

  • and some of the ergonomic aspects of it

  • that you couldn't have figured out

  • ahead of just thinking about it.

  • And, ergo the second prototyping rule,

  • which is "doing is the best kind of thinking."

  • They teach you to think a lot in school,

  • but I think it is a little bit overrated.

  • Now last example, you know,

  • actually Google is not the first team

  • that's tried to go make something like this

  • and if you search for headset display,

  • you get tons of images of teams

  • that have built various systems like this,

  • but I can tell you at a glance

  • that none of these pieces of hardware

  • are comfortable to wear for more than 15 minutes

  • except for maybe the helmet over there,

  • but then you got to wear a helmet.

  • So, you know, how would you go figure out a way

  • to go wear something like this comfortably?

  • The answer is really basic materials:

  • modeling wire,

  • paper,

  • clay,

  • and using something like this

  • is able to make something look like a pair of glasses really quickly.

  • I cut out pieces of clay that weighed

  • exactly the same amount as the electronic components

  • that we were talking about putting on the device,

  • wrapped it in paper so you didn't get clay on your face,

  • and then taped it to the modeling wire in various places

  • to go experiment with how a pair of glasses could fit on you.

  • And, we discovered something really important then.

  • Like, if you look at this drawing on the bottom,

  • it turns out that the weight of a pair of glasses

  • is actually mostly perceived

  • through how much weight is on your nose.

  • And, it also turns out that your ears can carry

  • a lot more weight than your nose,

  • and that is a totally different experiment,

  • you can ask me about that.

  • But, because of that fact,

  • if you put weight behind your ears,

  • it allows your ear to go act like the fulcrum of a lever

  • and it then takes weight off of your nose on the front.

  • And, actually, you can try this now, anybody with glasses,

  • if you push very gently on the back of your glasses,

  • you'll find, actually your glasses feel tremendously lighter.

  • Now, this meant that we not only discovered

  • something interesting about how to go,

  • you know, that's useful for developing a device like this,

  • we actually discovered something pretty fundamental

  • that never been discovered about glasses, period.

  • So, if you have really heavy glasses,

  • you could do this and you would be more comfortable.

  • Now, the last point I want to make is

  • about two types of learning

  • because through the process of rapid prototyping,

  • you are able to learn very quickly.

  • It's a very specific type of learning.

  • The type of learning that you usually learn in school

  • I call book learning.

  • It comes from what humanity already knows

  • and it's a necessary foundation for you guys to go and explore the world.

  • But there is a totally different type of learning,

  • which I call expansive learning,

  • and this is the learning you do on behalf of humanity.

  • Right?

  • You are creating something new,

  • you are expanding into the possibilities,

  • and you're building the sphere of human knowledge in that process.

  • And, we think about these things and as soon as you hear

  • like, ok, the infinite realm of possibilities

  • beyond the sphere of human knowledge,

  • you might be thinking there's the scientists

  • at the Large Hadron Collider

  • who have these amazing instruments,

  • like that's their job, right?

  • But the truth is that this action is available to all of us,

  • you know,

  • it's not just for the scientists,

  • it's also for the poet or the songwriter

  • that expresses an emotion for the first time in a unique way.

  • It's also for the person that has an amazing business idea

  • that they're certain could help millions of lives.

  • And, it's the realm of using paper, clay, and tape

  • in order to go find a new insight

  • in an ancient technology.

  • So now that you know a lot about rapid prototyping,

  • I'm excited to see what you do with it.

  • Thank you.

My name is Tom Chi.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

A2 BEG US TED-Ed google glass prototyping learning chopstick clay

【TED-Ed】Rapid prototyping Google Glass - Tom Chi

  • 7173 515
    Zenn posted on 2014/09/03
Video vocabulary