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  • So then I just got out of there as soon as I could.

  • It was... It was a terrible scene.

  • Okay, you ready for this?

  • Let's do it.

  • Hey, everyone.

  • I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking,

  • and welcome to this lesson on: "Phrasal Verb Opposites".

  • So, today with the help of my friend, Steve the spider, I am going to look at...

  • How many?

  • One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10 - 10 phrasal verbs and their opposites

  • for a total of 20 phrasal verbs.

  • That is more phrasal verbs than Steve has legs.

  • More phrasal verbs than Steve has legs.

  • Right?

  • So, we'll start from the top.

  • First: "check in" or "check into".

  • So you can check into a hotel when you first arrive.

  • Say: "I'm here to check in."

  • Okay?

  • Now, when you check in, obviously, when you finish your stay at a hotel you have to

  • "check out" or "check out of" the hotel.

  • So, Steve, remember that time when we drove down to the States, we went to Fun Spot which

  • is the biggest arcade in the world, we checked into the Holiday Inn on a Friday,

  • and we checked out on a Sunday?

  • It was a good time.

  • I played Pac-Man Mania for like four hours

  • straight.

  • Next, we have: "get in".

  • So, "to get in", specifically into an enclosed space like a room or a car, or "get into",

  • the opposite is: "get out" or "get out of" a place or something.

  • So, in a car, for example: "I got into the car. She got into the taxi."

  • So you get into a taxi or into a car, and then to leave you have to get out.

  • Now, you can also be inside your house, and you can tell someone, it's like: "Get in, get in, get in."

  • Or if you're very angry at them, you can say: "Get out!"

  • Like that one time, remember that?

  • You know what I'm talking about.

  • All right, next: "get on" or "get onto",

  • "get off" or "get off of".

  • Now, this is specifically for public transportation.

  • So, you can get on or get onto a bus, a train, a plane, a boat.

  • And then when you leave the bus, leave the train, leave the boat, leave the plane, you

  • get off the plane, get off the boat, or get off of the bus, or the subway, or the metro.

  • So, you get on the metro, the trip is finished, get off the metro.

  • Okay?

  • Depending on which part of the world you're from, you might say the metro or the subway.

  • I say metro because I work around Montreal, but if you go to Toronto most people say subway,

  • so it depends where you're from.

  • Next: "go out" and "stay in".

  • So this means...

  • "To go out" means to go see a movie, go outside of your house on the weekend, and do something

  • with your friends.

  • So after this, Steve and I are going to go out and have a little party somewhere.

  • Don't know where.

  • We haven't decided yet, but we got some friends waiting for us outside and we'll decide after.

  • Now, if you don't want to go out and you prefer a quiet night in your house, in your room

  • like Steve listening to Pink Floyd in his bedroom while staring up at the ceiling,

  • then you stay in.

  • So your friends ask you: "Hey. Do you want go out tonight?"

  • Say: "No, no.

  • Pink Floyd.

  • I'm going to stay in.

  • I need to take in this music."

  • Next: "pick up" and "put down".

  • So, very literal.

  • Pick up, put down.

  • Pick up, put down.

  • So you can pick up a glass, put down a glass.

  • Pick up a pencil, put down a pencil.

  • And this is another meaning of "pick up", so we have "pick up" and "drop off".

  • In this situation "pick up" can mean to get something or someone from a specific location.

  • So you can pick up someone from the daycare.

  • If you are a parent and you have a young child, you can pick them up from the daycare, at

  • the end of the day you get them.

  • You can drop them off at the daycare in the morning, meaning you leave them there.

  • For example, after work if you're calling your friend, your mom, your roommate, your

  • wife, your husband and they say:

  • -"Hey. What time are you going to be home?"

  • -"Oh.

  • I'm going to be a little late.

  • First I need to drop something off at the bank"-maybe a bill you have to pay-

  • "and I need to pick up something from the grocery store."

  • So maybe you are out of milk, you have no more milk so you need to pick up some milk

  • from the grocery store.

  • And, again, "drop off" not just for people, not just for kids, it can be for things, too.

  • Both of them can be for things.

  • So you can drop off money at someone's house, or drop off a CD, or drop off movie tickets somewhere.

  • "Put on", "take off".

  • So this is largely for clothes.

  • Right? So you can put on your socks, take off your socks.

  • Put on your jacket, take off your jacket.

  • Now, Steve after about one beer likes to take off his clothes.

  • I know he doesn't...

  • He's not wearing clothes now.

  • He looks good naked, anyways.

  • Spiders look good naked.

  • That's a weird sentence. I'm sorry.

  • But we'll...

  • We'll stop there.

  • I don't want to continue that story.

  • So: "slow down".

  • The opposite of "to slow down" is "to speed up", hurry up, go faster.

  • So if you're driving and, you know, you're driving with a friend, your friend might say:

  • "Whoa, whoa, whoa. Slow down. You don't want the police to stop you."

  • If you are late for something, your friend might say: "Speed up."

  • Okay? "We need to go quicker."

  • "Stay up" and "turn in".

  • This has a very specific context.

  • So, "to stay up" means to not go to sleep, but to say awake at night.

  • So, for example, last night I stayed up until 1am playing Dungeons & Dragons with my friends.

  • It's not true, but imagine.

  • So we stayed up until 2 o'clock watching old movies, old horror movies, for example.

  • Now, if you don't want to stay up, don't want to stay awake, you can turn in.

  • "To turn in" means to go to bed, go to sleep.

  • So, I stayed up until 11, which means I turned in at 11.

  • I went to sleep at 11.

  • And finally, "turn up", "turn down".

  • Very specific context.

  • If you have, you know, a stereo system, you can turn up the volume, make it louder, or

  • turn down the volume, make it softer, quieter.

  • [Music]

  • Steve, turn that down.

  • So, those are 20 phrasal verbs.

  • 20.

  • I know it's a lot.

  • Again, more phrasal verbs than Steve has legs.

  • So, if you'd like to test your understanding of the material,

  • I recommend that you watch this video more than once because there is a lot of information here.

  • And then you can do the quiz to make sure you fully get it.

  • If you enjoyed the video, please like it, comment on it, subscribe to the channel, and

  • check me out on Facebook and Twitter.

  • And if you want to support what we do here at engVid and make sure that we do these videos

  • forever and ever until the end of time, you can always donate to the site at the link

  • found somewhere here.

  • Okay?

  • Until next time, thanks for clicking.

  • Let's get out of here, Steve.

  • Steve!

So then I just got out of there as soon as I could.

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A2 US steve phrasal metro drop daycare check

Phrasal Verb Opposites in English-engVid Alex

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    洪巧蓉 posted on 2017/09/09
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