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  • Translator: Thu-Huong Ha Reviewer: Morton Bast

  • I love to collect things.

  • Ever since I was a kid, I've had massive collections

  • of random stuff, everything from bizarre hot sauces

  • from all around the world to insects

  • that I've captured and put in jars.

  • Now, it's no secret, because I like collecting things,

  • that I love the Natural History Museum

  • and the collections of animals

  • at the Natural History Museum in dioramas.

  • These, to me, are like living sculptures, right,

  • that you can go and look at,

  • and they memorialize a specific point of time

  • in this animal's life.

  • So I was thinking about my own life,

  • and how I'd like to memorialize my life, you know,

  • for the ages, and also — (Laughter) —

  • the lives of my friends, but

  • the problem with this is that my friends aren't quite keen

  • on the idea of me taxidermy-ing them. (Laughter)

  • So instead, I turned to video,

  • and video is the next best way to preserve and memorialize

  • someone and to capture a specific moment in time.

  • So what I did was, I filmed six of my friends

  • and then, using video mapping and video projection,

  • I created a video sculpture, which was these six friends

  • projected into jars. (Laughter)

  • So now I have this collection of my friends

  • I can take around with me whenever I go,

  • and this is called Animalia Chordata,

  • from the Latin nomenclature for

  • human being, classification system.

  • So this piece memorializes my friends in these jars,

  • and they actually move around. (Laughter)

  • So, this is interesting to me,

  • but it lacked a certain human element. (Laughter)

  • It's a digital sculpture, so I wanted to add

  • an interaction system. So what I did was,

  • I added a proximity sensor, so that when you get close

  • to the people in jars, they react to you in different ways.

  • You know, just like people on the street

  • when you get too close to them.

  • Some people reacted in terror. (Laughter)

  • Others reacted in asking you for help,

  • and some people hide from you.

  • So this was really interesting to me, this idea of

  • taking video off the screen and putting it in real life,

  • and also adding interactivity to sculpture.

  • So over the next year, I documented 40 of my other friends

  • and trapped them in jars as well

  • and created a piece known as Garden,

  • which is literally a garden of humanity.

  • But something about the first piece,

  • the Animali Chordata piece, kept coming back to me,

  • this idea of interaction with art,

  • and I really liked the idea of people being able to interact,

  • and also being challenged by interacting with art.

  • So I wanted to create a new piece that actually

  • forced people to come and interact with something,

  • and the way I did this was actually by projecting

  • a 1950s housewife into a blender. (Laughter)

  • This is a piece called Blend, and what it does is

  • it actually makes you implicit in the work of art.

  • You may never experience the entire thing yourself.

  • You can walk away, you can just watch as this character

  • stands there in the blender and looks at you,

  • or you can actually choose to interact with it.

  • So if you do choose to interact with the piece,

  • and you press the blender button, it actually sends

  • this character into this dizzying disarray of dishevelment.

  • By doing that, you are now part of my piece.

  • You, like the people that are trapped in my work

  • — (Blender noises, laughter) —

  • have become part of my work as well. (Laughter)

  • (Laughter)

  • (Applause)

  • But, but this seems a bit unfair, right?

  • I put my friends in jars, I put this character,

  • this sort of endangered species character in a blender.

  • But I'd never done anything about myself.

  • I'd never really memorialized myself.

  • So I decided to create a piece which is a self-portrait piece.

  • This is sort of a self-portrait taxidermy time capsule piece

  • called A Point Just Passed,

  • in which I project myself on top of a time card punch clock,

  • and it's up to you.

  • If you want to choose to punch that punch card clock,

  • you actually age me.

  • So I start as a baby, and then if you punch the clock,

  • you'll actually transform the baby into a toddler,

  • and then from a toddler I'm transformed into a teenager.

  • From a teenager, I'm transformed into my current self.

  • From my current self, I'm turned into a middle-aged man,

  • and then, from there, into an elderly man.

  • And if you punch the punch card clock a hundred times

  • in one day, the piece goes black

  • and is not to be reset until the next day.

  • So, in doing so, you're erasing time.

  • You're actually implicit in this work

  • and you're erasing my life.

  • So I like this about interactive video sculpture,

  • that you can actually interact with it,

  • that all of you can actually touch an artwork

  • and be part of the artwork yourselves,

  • and hopefully, one day, I'll have each and every one of you

  • trapped in one of my jars. (Laughter)

  • Thank you. (Applause)

Translator: Thu-Huong Ha Reviewer: Morton Bast

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B1 US TED piece laughter blender punch interact

【TED】Gabriel Barcia-Colombo: Capturing memories in video art (Gabriel Barcia-Colombo: Capturing memories in video art)

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