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  • (happy music)

  • - Hello everyone and welcome back to English With Lucy.

  • I probably look a little bit different today

  • and that is because I think I live in the hottest flat

  • in England,

  • or at least in Cambridge.

  • Oh my God.

  • Right, so it's around 27, 28 degrees outside

  • which for England is really, really hot

  • but inside my flat, it's like a damn rainforest.

  • It's humid, muggy, that's a really good word,

  • muggy is when it's like heavy, hot, sticky air, humidity

  • and I have a whole wall of windows,

  • which is great,

  • because it lets in loads of light

  • but it also contributes to a greenhouse effect in my flat

  • and so I'm absolutely boiling.

  • So I couldn't bring myself to do my hair

  • 'cause it would just,

  • I'd put it in and then it would fall out again

  • and also no turtlenecks today.

  • We've got my Coca Cola tee shirt instead

  • which not sponsored,

  • wish it was sponsored,

  • imagine having Coca Cola sponsor you, awesome.

  • So today, it's a really, really, really important video.

  • Today, I'm going to give you some advice

  • on how to stop translating into your native language

  • because a lot of people have this problem.

  • I've asked lots of English learners

  • and learners of other languages

  • and they say,

  • "I would be able to speak so much more fluently

  • "if I could stop translating."

  • Now, most of you probably already know this.

  • If you're new to this channel,

  • then I speak fluent Spanish

  • and I'm actively learning Italian

  • and I remember at the beginning

  • of my Spanish learning journey

  • I really found it hard not to translate.

  • And translating between English and Spanish

  • can be really, really difficult and annoying

  • because the word order is so different.

  • I'm now learning Italian actively

  • and I'm managing to do so

  • without translating into Spanish or English.

  • So speaking from my own experience as a language learner

  • and speaking from my experience

  • as an English language teacher

  • I'm going to give you some advice

  • and hopefully help you get over this massive, massive hurdle

  • that's preventing you from improving.

  • Firstly, before we get started,

  • I'd just like to thank the sponsor of today's video,

  • Lingoda.

  • This is a company I've been working with for awhile.

  • I really, really believe in what they have on offer.

  • They are an online language academy.

  • They teach English, French, Spanish and German

  • and you sign up on a monthly basis

  • and you get a combination of group and private lessons

  • taught via video chat.

  • They have really, really great materials

  • taught to you and delivered to you

  • by real native qualified teachers

  • and if you look at the prices,

  • it's actually very, very reasonable.

  • It's often much more affordable to study with Lingoda

  • than it is to go to an in person language school.

  • They've given me a discount for you.

  • You can get 50 euros or dollars

  • off your first month subscription at Lingoda

  • by clicking on the link in the description box

  • and using the discount code ENGLUCY6, ENGLUCY6.

  • All the information is down there.

  • Right, right, let's get started with the video.

  • My God, it is so hot.

  • I bet all of you are in your country,

  • actually, let's do something fun.

  • Tell me where you live

  • and what temperature it is where you are right now

  • 'cause I bet some of you are in like 40 degree heat.

  • I know my friends in Seville are really suffering

  • with the heat

  • and I'm here with 27 degrees dying.

  • I'm very sensitive.

  • Okay, so I've been thinking about this question

  • for a long time

  • and I have actually made some notes on my phone

  • just because I want to get in the right order for you.

  • So bear with me.

  • So, how to avoid translating into a native language.

  • Well, the first tip I can give you

  • and this will not apply to everyone

  • is don't start in the first place.

  • If you're at like a beginner level of English,

  • some translation is inevitable,

  • you're going to do it.

  • The way we learn in school is amarillo, yellow,

  • naranja, orange.

  • We learn through translation.

  • However, think back to when you were a baby.

  • How did you acquire your first ever language,

  • your mother tongue?

  • You learnt through observing, seeing, watching, hearing,

  • smelling, tasting, watching actions.

  • You didn't learn through translation

  • because you had nothing to base your translation on

  • because you had no mother tongue.

  • So babies are capable of learning a language

  • without any other language as reference,

  • yet we find it incredibly difficult.

  • So what you need to think is simplification.

  • Babies start small

  • and then over years and years and years,

  • they build their vocabulary.

  • And you need to apply this to yourself as well.

  • It's much more effective to learn vocabulary

  • by observing and taking things in

  • than it is to just look at something in the dictionary.

  • And that brings me onto my next point.

  • Oh my God, I'm so hot.

  • And that brings me onto my next point

  • which is grab your bilingual dictionary

  • and throw it out of the window.

  • Don't do that, okay,

  • it might land on somebody's head.

  • Just place it to one side very carefully

  • and then pick up your monolingual dictionary,

  • is that the word for it?

  • And then pick up the dictionary

  • in the language that you are learning,

  • in many of your cases, it will be English

  • and start letting the language define itself.

  • So with words like nouns and verbs

  • it can be a little difficult to understand

  • but that's where you need to learn through observation.

  • When you're looking at adjectives, adverbs

  • and other things like that,

  • try to understand the definition in that same language first

  • because what you're going to be doing

  • is training yourself to think in the language

  • that you're learning

  • which brings me on to my third point.

  • Oh my God, what a beautifully

  • well planned out video this is.

  • So my next two points

  • are about thinking and speaking to yourself

  • in that language.

  • Now, I actually recommend that you start

  • by speaking out loud to yourself in the other language.

  • I think I mentioned that in a video about conversation,

  • improving your conversation and communication.

  • If you're interested in that

  • then you can watch that video just up there.

  • However, speaking to yourself in that other language

  • is a really, really key factor

  • in learning to think in the language.

  • So for example with Spanish, I'll be driving

  • and I'll describe the movements

  • that I'm going to be making with the car.

  • I'll be like (speaking in foreign language).

  • Anyway, that is what I do

  • or I'll be puttering around my kitchen

  • cooking and talking to myself

  • about what I'm doing.

  • And you will start to notice your own errors,

  • especially when you hear yourself speaking out loud.

  • Once you're comfortable speaking out loud

  • to yourself in private in that additional language,

  • move on to starting to think.

  • Now, I think speaking should come before thinking

  • but that's just my opinion.

  • Everybody learns in different ways.

  • I personally think it's easier to spot errors

  • and get comfortable when you're speaking out loud.

  • Now the speaking out loud,

  • you should do in private

  • but the thinking,

  • I want you to do it everywhere,

  • on the bus, seeing what goes past.

  • It can relate to the video I made

  • on how to learn and remember vocabulary

  • which you can watch up here.

  • It's a useful method

  • where you observe everything around you

  • and you check to see if you know it in your chosen language.

  • The full explanation is in the video

  • and some people have found that really, really useful.

  • I know I found it useful.

  • See if you can apply using a monolingual dictionary

  • to that video.

  • I think I recommend using a bilingual one.

  • See if you can do it with an English dictionary.

  • Yeah, so by thinking in English

  • and I'm talking about describing people,

  • if you see someone walking,

  • think to yourself, that man is walking,

  • he is walking down the street

  • or just going through your motions.

  • I am getting off the bus.

  • I am going to go to the shops.

  • In your head,

  • you're just starting to immerse yourself in the language.

  • Ah, that beautiful word, immerse,

  • to immerse yourself,

  • brings me on to point number five

  • which is immersion.

  • And that's actually one of my favourite words.

  • I know I have a lot of favourite words

  • but immersion, immersion, mmm, that's nice,

  • that's a nice word.

  • So immersion is something that you should be doing

  • throughout your learning experience.

  • And it's something you can do whilst multitasking

  • which is one of my favourite things.

  • So, when I'm doing something

  • that doesn't require 100% concentration

  • like cooking or cleaning,

  • I always have something on in the background.

  • Cleaning, cooking, washing the car, gardening, whatever,

  • any task that allows you to listen to something else

  • at the same time as doing something else,

  • have something on in that language in the background.

  • I know I'm saying it as if it's revolutionary

  • but really, don't forget to do it.

  • I know you can waste so much time

  • and miss out on so much learning.

  • By having it on in the background

  • and not even listening,

  • you will be getting used to pronunciation and accents.

  • And by listening and concentrating on what they're saying,

  • you will be familiarising yourself

  • with certain grammar lexi,

  • different vocabulary,

  • but also, you will notice where you are lacking.

  • So, if you listen to a radio programme about,

  • I always say photography,

  • what can I say?

  • So if you listen to a radio programme about politics,

  • for example.

  • My last point is make it daily.

  • Focus on frequency and consistency.

  • I always say to my students

  • that 20 minutes a day of high quality,

  • not even studying,

  • just language acquisition,

  • language acquisition,

  • I sometimes surprise myself

  • with the words that come out of my mouth,

  • 20 minutes a day of high quality English time,

  • there we are,

  • that sounds more like something Lucy would say,