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  • He is considered the father of the digital revolution, a master of innovation and a design perfectionist

  • He had a network of over eight billion dollars in 2010

  • He is one of my personal favorite entrepreturs of all time

  • He is Steve Jobs from Apple and here is his top ten rules for success

  • The thing I would say is

  • when you grow up, you tend to get told that the world is the way it is

  • and your

  • your life is just to live your life inside the world, try not to bash into the walls too much

  • Ah, try to have a nice family life

  • have fun, save a little money

  • but life

  • that's a very limited life

  • life can be much broader

  • once you discover one simple fact

  • and that is everything around you that you call life was made up by people there were no smarter than you

  • and you can change it, you can influence it

  • you can, you can build your own things that other people can use

  • and the minute that you understand that you can poke life in actually

  • something you know you push in, something you pop out the other side

  • you can, you can change it

  • you can mold it

  • Ahm, that's maybe the most important thing

  • is to shake off this

  • this ... notion that life is there and you're just gonna live in it

  • versus, embrace it, change it, improve it

  • make your mark upon it

  • Uh, I think that is very important

  • and however you learn that once you learn it

  • you'll wanna change life and make it better

  • cause it's kinda messed up in a lot of ways

  • once you learn that, you'll never be the same again

  • People say you have to have a lot of passion for what you're doing

  • And it's totally true

  • and the reason is

  • is because it's so hard that if you don't, any rational person would give up

  • it's really hard

  • and you have to do it over a sustained period of time

  • so if you don't love it, you don't have fun doing it

  • you don't really love it

  • you're gonna give up

  • and that's what happens to most people actually if you really look at

  • at the ones that ended up

  • you know being successful "on quote the eyes of society" than the ones that didn't

  • often times, it's the ones that were sucessful love what they did so they could persevere

  • you know, it got really tough

  • and... and the ones that didn't love it, quit

  • cause they're ???????

  • right, who would wanna put up with this stuff if you dont love it

  • so, it's a lot of hard work

  • and ... and it's a lot of worrying constantly

  • and ... if you don't love it, you're gonna fail

  • so you gotta love it, you gotta have passion

  • we had absolutely no idea what people gonna do ....

  • because we can't afford to buy it a computer to the market so we liberated

  • some parts for new Packard and tari quickly i'm not report down design for

  • about six months and decided that

  • I would build on computer so we built and i was up till four in the morning

  • for many moons and we've got it working we showed some reference immediately

  • everybody want and it turned out to talk about 40 hours to build one of these

  • things in about another 20 30 40 bucket and we have a lot of friends at work

  • that similar companies who could liberate the parts also have seven Mary

  • screaming of arts in line

  • helping our friends to build computers and it's just going to be a tremendous

  • strain on our on our lives so we got the idea one day that that we could make a

  • printed circuit board without the parts and selling black printed circuit boards

  • to our friends and probably cut the assembly and debug time down that you

  • know five ten out

  • so wat soldiers hpc calculator and i sold my van we got 1,300 bucks together

  • and they are a friend of ours who is this a pc board layout person 1,300

  • bucks to do is lay out the side we sell printed circuit board that twice what it

  • cost to build them and hopefully recoup our calculator and transportation some

  • later date

  • so that's what we did and I was out trying to peddle PC boards one day and

  • walked into a bike shop the first by chopping out of you and Paul Terrell

  • then owner of the bike shop said you would like to take 50 of these computers

  • and I saw dollar signs in front of my eyes

  • and what he had one catch was that he wanted them fully assembled and tested

  • ready to go

  • which is a new twist so we spent the next five days on the phone with

  • distributors and convince the electronics parts distributors around

  • here to give us about ten thousand dollars with the parts are thinner this

  • time Susie as so we got the parts and we built a hundred computers and we sold 50

  • of them for cash and 29 days paid off with distributors and that's how we got

  • started so we have 50 computers leftover while that man we had to sell so then we

  • started worrying about marketing wearing red distribution got on the phone with

  • the other computer stores around the country and gradually the whole thing

  • began to build momentum and at that point in time we had some feeling that

  • we were onto something

  • but the feeling was is so different than the experience of actually seeing it

  • happen right now it's entirely different and sometimes a lot of a lot of people

  • ask what did you know it was going too much go into this phenomenon and you can

  • say yeah you know we planned it out we have led on a piece of paper but the

  • experience is seeing 500 people working at apple computers are different in the

  • experience of seeing a five-year-old kid who really understands what he's the

  • tool that he's got in front when you first got the job at the yo you got a

  • call from Steve Jobs and he offered you some advice

  • well he didn't call to offer me advice but we have worked together on a Nike

  • Apple collaboration called nike+ we took what Apple knows what nike nose and you

  • know brought a new technology to the market anyway long story short uh

  • he said hey congratulations that's great you're going to do a great job

  • I said well do you have any advice and he said no no you know your grade and

  • then there's a pause and goes well I do have some advice

  • it was 90 makes some of the best product in the world

  • I mean product that you lust after absolutely beautiful stunning product

  • but you also make a lot of crap

  • he said just get rid of the crappy stuff and focus on the good stuff and then I

  • expected a little pause and a laugh but there was there was a pause but no

  • laughs at the animal and he was absolutely right

  • greatest people are self-managing they don't need to be managed you think they

  • know what if once they know what to do

  • they'll go figure out how to do it they don't need to be managed at all what

  • they need is a common vision and that's what leadership is what leadership is

  • having a vision being able to articulate that so the people around you can

  • understand it and getting a consensus on a common vision we wanted people that

  • were insanely great at what they did but work were not necessarily those seasoned

  • professionals but who had on at the tips of their fingers and in their passion

  • the latest understanding of where technology was and what we could do with

  • that technology and he wanted to bring that it's a lot of people so the neatest

  • thing that happens is when you get a core group of you know ten great people

  • that it becomes self policing as to who they let in to that group so I consider

  • the most important job of someone like myself is recruiting agonized over

  • hiring we have the interviews I go back and look at some of the interviews again

  • they would start at nine or ten in the morning and go through dinner

  • I knew interviewing would talk to everybody in the building at least once

  • maybe a couple times and then come back for another round of interviews and then

  • they'll get together and talk about it and then before the last edited by now

  • it's critical hardly ever here at least to my mind was when we finally decided

  • we like them enough to show them the Macintosh prototype and then set them

  • down in front of it and if they just kind of our borders and this is a nice

  • computer we don't want we

  • I wanted their eyes to light up and then to get really excited and then we knew

  • they were one of us and everybody just wanted to work not because it was work

  • that had to be done but it was because something that we really believed in

  • that was just going to really make a difference and that's what kept the

  • whole thing going we all want to do exactly the same thing

  • instead of spending our time arguing about what the computer should be

  • we all knew what the computer should be and just when did we went through that

  • stage and Apple where we went out and we got off we're going to be a big company

  • let's hire professional management

  • we went out and hired a bunch of professional management it didn't work

  • at all

  • most of them are bozos they they knew how to manage but they don't know how to

  • do anything

  • and so what if you're a great person why do you want to work for something you

  • can't learn anything from and you know what's interesting you know what the

  • best managers are there are the great individual contributors who never ever

  • want to be a manager but the side they have to be a manager because all every

  • no one else is going to be able to do as good a job as them after hiring two

  • professional managers from outside the company and firing them both jobs

  • gambled on Debbie : a member of the Macintosh team 32 years old and english

  • literature major with an MBA from Stanford

  • did he was a financial manager with no experience in manufacturing

  • I mean there's no way in the world anybody else would give me this chance

  • to run this kind of operation and I don't kid myself about that is an

  • incredible high risk for myself personally and professionally and for

  • Apple as the company and put a person like myself in this job

  • I mean they're really getting on a lot of things we're betting that my feel

  • that organizational effectiveness

  • you know override all those in a lack of Technology lack of experience lack of

  • you know time in manufacturing

  • so it's a big risk and i'm just an example in every single person on the

  • Mac team almost in your you know entry level person you could say that about

  • this is a place where people were afforded incredibly unique opportunities

  • to prove that they could do a good down

  • they could write the book again inscribed inside the casing of every

  • Macintosh

  • unseen by the consumer are the signatures of the whole team

  • this is apple's way of affirming that their latest innovation is a product of

  • the individuals who created it

  • not the corporation it's very interesting

  • I was worth about over a million dollars when I was 23 and over 10 million

  • dollars when I was 24 and over a hundred million dollars for those 25 and it's it

  • wasn't that important because I never did it for the money

  • I I think money is wonderful thing because it enables you to do things

  • enables you to in investing ideas that don't have a short-term payback and

  • things like that but especially at that point in my life it was it was not the

  • most important thing the most important thing was the company

  • the people the products we were making what we were going to enable people to

  • do with these products so I didn't think about it a great deal and I never sold

  • any stock just really believe that the company would do very well over the long

  • term

  • our goal is to make the best personal computers in the world and make products

  • we are proud to sell and would recommend to our family and friends and we want to

  • do that at the lowest price as we can but i have to tell you there's some

  • stuff in our industry that we wouldn't be proud to ship that we wouldn't be

  • proud to recommend to our family and friends and we can't do it

  • we just can't ship junk so there's there's a thorough thresholds that we

  • can't cross because of who we are but we want to make the best personal computers

  • in the industry slice of the industry that wants that too

  • and what you'll find is our products are usually not premium-priced you go what

  • you go and price out our competitors products and you add the features that

  • you have to add to make them useful and you'll find in some cases they are more

  • expensive than our price

  • x the difference is we don't offer stripped-down lousy products you know we

  • just don't offer categories of products like that but if you move those aside

  • and compare us with our competitors

  • I think we compare pretty favorably and a lot of people who have been doing that

  • and saying that now for the last 18 months

  • yes mr. jobs

  • you're a bright an important man

  • your tongue

  • add and clear that I'm several counts you discussed you don't know what you're

  • talking about

  • I would like for example for you to express in clear terms

  • how is a java any of its incarnations address that the idea is embodied and

  • open . and when you're finished with that perhaps you could tell us which you

  • personally have been doing for the last seven years

  • yeah

  • you know you can please some of the people some of the time but

  • one of the hardest things when you're trying to effect change is that people

  • like this gentleman are right in some areas

  • I'm sure that there are some things open doctors probably even more than i am not

  • familiar with that nothing else out there does and I'm sure that you can

  • make some demos

  • maybe a small commercial app that demonstrates those things

  • the hardest thing is what

  • how does that fit in to a cohesive larger vision that's going to allow you

  • to sell eight billion dollars 10 billion dollars of products a year and one of

  • the things I've always found is that you've gotta start with the customer

  • experience and work backwards to the technology

  • you can't start with the technology and try to figure out where you're going to

  • try to sell it and I've made this mistake probably more than anybody else

  • in this room and I got the scar tissue approve it and I know that it's the case

  • and as we have tried to come up with a strategy and a vision for apple

  • it started with what incredible benefits can we give to the customer where can we

  • take the customer not not starting with let's sit down with the engineers and

  • and figure out what awesome technology we have and then how we going to market

  • that and I think that's the right path to take

  • I remember with the laser writer

  • we built the world's first small laser printers you know and there was awesome