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  • - [Jun] Hey guys! - [Rachel] Happy new year!

  • - [Both] We're in America!

  • - It's snowing! Look at the birdies!

  • - This is, like, the fourth or fifth time for me to come here

  • and I've noticed many things

  • that are different from my country, Japan.

  • so this is what I´'m gonna talk about today.

  • - Finally, it's the "Jun's Culture Shock" video!

  • So since you've come here,

  • what's the most shocking thing

  • that you've seen in America?

  • - That would be turning right on a red light.

  • - Really? That's the most shocking?

  • - I mean, 'cause without knowing,

  • and I was actually in the car with you.

  • That was my first time for me to see my wife drive,

  • and then,

  • like, it was clearly red and you just turned right.

  • I was like, "What?"

  • - Yeah.

  • - So that was pretty shocking to me.

  • So here in America, I guess you're supposed to turn right on red

  • if there's no car coming from left.

  • - You don't have to.

  • We had an oil crisis in the '70s

  • and then they made this law

  • so that they could preserve oil.

  • Instead of just idling at the traffic lights,

  • it lets people keep going longer.

  • So you can just go if there's no traffic coming.

  • - Yeah, yeah. But that was quite shocking to me,

  • and as soon as I got to your parents' house,

  • another thing I noticed is that,

  • when you lock the door,

  • it goes sideways when you lock in Japan,

  • but here, like, the door lock

  • was this way when it's locked, isn't it?

  • - [Papa] Yeah, it's different.

  • - Yeah.

  • - [Jun] So now it's open, right?

  • - [Papa] Yeah.

  • - [Rachel] Are they all like this, Papa?

  • - [Papa] Yeah.

  • - [Rachel] In America this way means open?

  • - [Papa] Yeah.

  • - [Rachel] Yup. Yup, locked.

  • I never noticed.

  • - And what else?

  • Right, the yard. The size of the yard is just amazing.

  • - Yeah, yards!

  • - It's huge.

  • Last time, when your family came,

  • and you went to see your uncle,

  • your uncle came with the golf club, and he was...

  • ...putting... he was, like, just swinging the ball.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Putting in the backyard.

  • I don't know if it's called--

  • I don't know golf terms.

  • - Yeah. But some people have really, really big yards

  • and you can just play golf, like, practicing.

  • - Yeah. So my mom has that yard and then

  • the entire forest and hill behind her.

  • She owns that, too.

  • Which my brothers go up--

  • well, when they lived there,

  • they used to go up it and hunt.

  • - Yeah.

  • And squirrels. Squirrels are everywhere here,

  • and that's something I'm not used to.

  • I don't think many Japanese people

  • actually see squirrels in, like, real life, really,

  • unless you live in the countryside.

  • - If you guys have been around our channel for a long time,

  • you might have seen one of our really old videos

  • where we went to a park, and I talked about a story

  • where Jun mentioned that in Japan,

  • the squirrels live in the "deep forest".

  • It sounds so ominous!

  • You could only see squirrels in the "deep forest".

  • They're everywhere here.

  • - I grew up in a somewhat countryside area,

  • where there are so many just rice paddies

  • and just trees and river,

  • it's pretty countryside, and I can see mountains

  • from my window in my room,

  • but you don't have squirrels.

  • - Yeah, I guess not.

  • - I guess that's why I said, "deep forest".

  • - Yeah.

  • - Oh, and another quite shocking thing was that

  • I knew it, I expected it, but still,

  • it was pretty shocking.

  • People carry around guns.

  • - [Rachel] Some people. - [Jun] Yeah.

  • - [Jun] Like your dad. - [Rachel] Yeah, my dad.

  • My dad carries a gun.

  • - And you told me that when I first went to America,

  • and I was pretty nervous.

  • - To meet my dad?

  • - Yeah, like what if I say something

  • offensive or rude, like, accidentally?

  • Will he just pull the gun out?

  • - Oh, people don't do that!

  • - I'm just kidding!

  • Your dad is amazing. He's really nice

  • and now he's like my drone teacher.

  • - My dad really likes drones.

  • - He taught me a lot of things.

  • I learned so much from your dad.

  • - Ever since we've been here,

  • my dad's done nothing except when I talk to Jun.

  • - Like, I go visit my dad

  • and then he takes Jun outside right away

  • and they're just playing with drones.

  • - Yeah. Well, not just that, but

  • Your dad always teaches me a lot of things,

  • and new things, and I really appreciate it.

  • - Yeah.

  • - Your dad even built his own house, right?

  • - Yeah.

  • - He knows what to make

  • and he can fix a lot of things

  • and that's something that

  • I've always wanted to be able to.

  • - That's kind of, like, expected in my family,

  • for guys to know how to

  • do some like home renovations and stuff.

  • So my brother just bought a house,

  • and he was making plans for renovations,

  • and he's planning on doing most of it himself.

  • We're gonna go there this weekend and paint.

  • - Right, and that's another thing again.

  • You guys, like, especially when it comes to houses,

  • you guys do a lot of things by yourself,

  • like go to your home center, get paint,

  • and just paint your wall yourself

  • or even peel off the wallpaper.

  • Or some people even fix their toilets themselves.

  • - Yeah.

  • - What else do you do? Like, anything?

  • - It depends on the person and what they know how to do.

  • Like, my family,

  • several people in my family know

  • every part of building a house, so they can do anything.

  • I mean, it depends on the person.

  • there are people who don't know

  • anything about that kind of stuff,

  • but especially if your family is

  • somewhat more blue collar,

  • then I imagine you know at least basic stuff

  • about fixing your own car

  • and fixing stuff in your house.

  • - That too, that too.

  • Fixing your car yourself.

  • In Japan, you have to get car inspection,

  • like every other year, but here,

  • I think it depends on the area,

  • but have you had...

  • - I've never heard of a car inspection.

  • - Just do it yourself?

  • - I mean not here.

  • - That depends on the area.

  • - I don't know. I've never heard of that.

  • Maybe some places have that.

  • - On car inspections, I appreciate it,

  • but I don't like that, because it's expensive.

  • I'm sure fixing yourself would be a lot cheaper if you can do it.

  • There are so many great shows here,

  • and I just couldn't stop watching.

  • - America has mastered entertainment.

  • This is one thing we have.

  • Once you start watching, you just can't stop it

  • until you finish the season,

  • and then you realize that there will be

  • like six more seasons,

  • and you can't stop watching again,

  • so you need to stay up all night.

  • Oh, and also it's really not common to have ceiling lights here, is it?

  • Or is it just my...

  • - I don't know about like super new houses,

  • or like other parts of the country,

  • but where we live, no; it's really dark. I hate it.

  • I wish we had ceiling lights.

  • - It looks really nice and very neat to me,

  • but sometimes I need a ceiling light

  • to light up entire floors so I can see things well.

  • - Yeah. I mean, it's mostly just the living rooms

  • that often don't have ceiling lights,

  • although, some really nice houses

  • have, like, recessed lighting,

  • or they have those kind of spot light things.

  • Our living room in Japan has really bright LED lights,

  • which I like. It helps me see easier, but...

  • - I also notice a lot of things when I go outside, too.

  • There are many, many libraries here.

  • - Yeah! More than McDonald's! I'm so proud!

  • - You see McDonald's like every corner every and block,

  • but you have more than that, right?

  • - Yeah.

  • - That's just amazing, isn't it?

  • - Libraries are great. I love libraries.

  • - Another thing I noticed when I went to a clothing store

  • was that in some places,

  • you can take hangers with you when you buy clothes.

  • - Yeah. Like Kohl's.

  • They gave me the hanger.

  • - You have to return this normally in Japan.

  • Inside the grocery stores are just insanely big, compared to the ones I go to.

  • - We need that selection.

  • - I think it was the cereal aisle you took me first.

  • - Oh, yeah!

  • - You guys have a really, really long and tall aisle

  • that has like 20 shelves of cereals.

  • - [Rachel] Yeah, it's just cereal.

  • - [Jun] Just cereals. - [Rachel] Yeah.

  • - And of course the portion you get

  • for the price you pay

  • is a lot, lot more than you get in Japan.

  • Like, this giant bag of potatoes, just bagged potatoes

  • - Oh, yeah; the big bags of potatoes.

  • - Like, it's so big that you can't even fit in the camera.

  • I also noticed that some food

  • are really colorful and very, very vivid

  • and they're not really appetizing to me,

  • but I guess the are to you?

  • - It's usually the kids' foods that are brightly colored,

  • unless it's, like, cake. Cake can be any color.

  • Cupcakes! Cupcakes can be any color.

  • - They look so artificial to me,

  • that...I don't know.

  • - They look happy to me.

  • I want a cupcake now.

  • - Oh, and about sizes.

  • When I went to a fast food restaurant,

  • I ordered this large size of Coke,

  • for the first time in my life,

  • and they gave me this extra, extra, extra large Coke.

  • It was just gigantic!

  • - Fast food restaurants in Japan

  • have some of the same menu items,

  • but they're smaller there than they are here in America.

  • Like, Subway sandwiches.

  • No joke. A six inch sub there was like this.

  • It was tiny. It was like three bites of a sandwich.

  • - [Jun] I don't remember exactly how small it was, so-- - [Rachel] Very small!

  • - I can't remember well,

  • so next time I think we should measure it.

  • - Oh, my God! Yeah, okay!

  • We'll go to Subway one more time while we're here

  • and take a video, and then we'll go to Subway

  • in Japan and take a video.

  • - And at McDonald's, the size of Coke.

  • Let's measure those!

  • - [Jun] Okay! - [Rachel] Okay!

  • - Anyway, America's big.

  • That's what I noticed.

  • So for maybe American viewers:

  • What kind of interesting American things

  • should I experience next time?

  • Maybe you can let me know in the comments section.

  • (Rachel potting evil things)

  • Anyway, thank you for watching. Bye!

  • - Bye!

- [Jun] Hey guys! - [Rachel] Happy new year!