Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Oh my gosh! Oh my gosh! Oh my gosh! You know what just happened today. When I was driving

  • to my work place. I almost had a near miss and then the moment I stepped out of my car

  • it started raining. But as luck would have it, I had my umbrella, I was lucky. Have you

  • ever been lucky like that? Or has any of your friend or family ever been lucky like that?

  • Of course you've been, but does it happen that you run out of expressions to talk about

  • being lucky and you just end up saying. I was lucky, which sounds very boring? If that

  • has happened with you then please stay tuned with me. I'm Michelle and today we are learning

  • different expressions to express being lucky.

  • Starting with the first one, It's a good thing that. God forbid if somebody has an accident

  • and you go to see them in the hospital and you find out that the victims, the people

  • who underwent the accident they're absolutely fine, however their car was damaged. So another

  • disaster has been prevented although the car was damaged, but there was one more disaster

  • that they could have got hurt that was prevented. So in such a situation you could always say,

  • it’s a good thing that they were not hurt. So the first disaster is that there was an

  • accident. The second disaster could be that they could have got hurt, but they did not,

  • so we would say, It's a good thing that the positive statement plus the positive statement.

  • It’s just as well. As I told you this morning, it was raining the moment when I stepped out

  • of my car, but It’s just as well that I had my umbrella. That's how you can use this

  • phrase. This is also always followed by a positive statement, but its proceeded means

  • before it comes a negative circumstance. And what is a unwanted circumstance in this situation?

  • That it rained, but the positive part is that I had my umbrella, that I had my umbrella.

  • So these two statements are always used when an unwanted circumstance has been prevented

  • or something wrong did not happen, unwanted damage prevented for these two.

  • Moving on to the next two. Fortunately or luckily that they were not hurt. So we can

  • continue this, we can also use this as an expression or it’s a good thing that they

  • would not hurt. Fortunately or luckily that they were not hurt. This is also used; It

  • is always followed by a positive circumstance followed by a positive circumstance. You must

  • also remember that you will use this expression, when you're retelling the story to somebody.

  • So my friend had an accident, I visited them in the hospital their car was damaged, but

  • fortunately or luckily they did not get hurt. We are done with this.

  • Moving on to the forth one, As luck would have it. So let's imagine that one fine day

  • you're driving down the city and another of your friend is also driving down the city,

  • but you don't know and while youre driving you run out of gas. However your friend is

  • there and he's there to offer you a lift, so in that situation you could say as luck

  • would have it, Mike was present to offer me a lift. This is also followed by a positive

  • situation and you will always use it in retelling the story circumstance, retelling the story.

  • If somebody hears you, how would they reply? If somebody hears the story that you're telling

  • them, they would say that was a stroke of luck or if somebody's saying a story to you

  • sharing a story with you. How would you reply? You would say that was a stroke of luck or

  • just imagine, if one of your friend walks in an office for an interview and he just

  • gets the job. How would you reply? Will you be jealous? Don't be; don't be envious with

  • your friend. You could just say that it is a stroke of luck or it was an incredible stroke

  • of luck.

  • The same applies for, it’s lucky. This can also be used in the same situation saying

  • that it’s lucky that you got the job the moment you walked into the office. It’s

  • lucky that the interviewer was so pleased and so happy with you. So as I was telling

  • you that about that story, Let's imagine putting on our imagination cap that one fine day you're

  • driving and your friend Mike is also driving and he offers you a lift and there you could

  • say that as luck would have it Mike was driving. Mike was also driving down the city, but let's

  • say mike is not driving and you run out of gas. Then what will you do? Then it’s very

  • or most fortunate that there was a gas station nearby. That's also used when you are telling

  • about a story that has happened in the past or an incident that is happened in the past.

  • It’s very or most fortunate that there was a gas station.

  • It was a close. I was just about to fall, it was a near miss. But did I fall? No I did

  • not fall, so when something bad is about to happen. If you're about to fall or there's

  • about to be an accident. That's what you call as a close thing. You were about to, but it

  • did not happen. I applied the brakes otherwise it was a near miss, so you can use it on that

  • situation. Where something bad is about to happen. But does not happen.

  • It must be your lucky day; you have won an all-expenses paid trip to Bahamas. Do you

  • think that's true? Sorry it’s not your lucky day then. But if you ever hear that statement

  • then it is your lucky day. When you get something in a very unexpected form. You can say that,

  • It’s your lucky day. Probably you know a representative might just call you one day

  • and say that, “Hello sir it’s your lucky day. You've won an all-expenses paid trip

  • to Bahamas, Maldives or wherever you want to go, so this is more like it can be used

  • in the beginning of a sentence before you're sharing something.

  • You lucky thing or slightly prohibited expression Jammy bastard. You lucky thing is a much better

  • way of saying this. This is a very informal way and a slang. It is a slang, which I wouldn't

  • suggest unless the person is like really close to you and they are comfortable with you saying

  • that , so you lucky thing can be that if your friend tells you that, Okay I’ve won all

  • expenses paid trip to Bahamas. What would you tell him? You lucky thing or we can also

  • sayThat was a stroke of luck or It’s lucky that you did. The word here Jammy this

  • means lucky and this is a phrase very common in England and if you want you may use it.

  • But I suggest this is a better option for you to use.

  • So you've learnt different ways of being lucky. Different ways of saying that you have been

  • lucky or commenting if someone else has been lucky, but if you've been very unlucky lately.

  • Then for you, we will do another video. Where I'm gonna teach you expressions that you can

  • use if you're being unlucky. Thank you so much for your time. I hope to see you really

  • soon with a new video and with a new fun learning session. See you soon. Miss me bye, bye.

Oh my gosh! Oh my gosh! Oh my gosh! You know what just happened today. When I was driving

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

A2 UK lucky driving circumstance stroke hurt prevented

Interesting English expressions to express ‘Being Lucky’ – Free English lessons

  • 235 20
    stev posted on 2017/06/17
Video vocabulary