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  • "To be or not to be?" that is the qu-...

  • No, it's not the question.

  • You are here to learn a lesson.

  • Hi. I'm James from engVid, and today's lesson is going to be on "do" or "make".

  • Well, why am I doing this lesson?

  • Many students make a mistake with these two verbs.

  • Okay?

  • And the problem is native speakers almost never make this mistake, and as soon as you

  • make this mistake we will know that you are just learning English or low-level English.

  • So this lesson will help you fully understand how to use it so that you can start speaking

  • like a native speaker right away.

  • Now, in order to do that we have to clearly know what the difference is between "do" and "make",

  • and then give examples of how we use them.

  • I'll also give you collocations.

  • Collocations are words that go with "do" and "make" regularly so you know even if you're

  • having a difficult time, when you say something like: "cake", you're going to say "do" or "make".

  • Let's find out in five seconds, shall we?

  • Let's go to the board where I'll break down what "do" is and give you examples; what "make"

  • is, give you examples; then I'll give you those collocations and a short quiz.

  • All right.

  • E, what is it, "do" or "make"?

  • When I makes me a cake, do I do me a cake or make me a cake?

  • Well, let's find out.

  • If an action is repetitive, something you do on a regular basis, we're going to use

  • the verb "do".

  • Now, I should note very quickly here I am not going to talk on the auxiliary, like:

  • "Do you like that?"

  • I'm not going to ask these questions.

  • We have other videos, so please go to engVid, go check them out, and they'll clearly do...

  • Do, [laughs].

  • Show you the uses of "do" as the auxiliary. Okay?

  • This is specifically how you understand it.

  • If something is done repetitively, we use "do", which is true for most simple present verbs.

  • When we talk in the simple present it's about repeated actions.

  • So, "do" is no different from that.

  • Okay?

  • Obligation.

  • An obligation might be something like I do homework every night.

  • It's a thing I must do.

  • Okay?

  • So we use it for obligation.

  • Multiple actions.

  • Now, listen to me carefully.

  • "I do the dishes."

  • I'll give you a visual representation or a visual picture of it in a second, but I want

  • you to understand the concept.

  • A lot of times in English we use what's called "shorthand".

  • Instead of saying every verb that I'm going to do, what I do is I use...

  • Or I even said it here, replacing verbs.

  • We put the verb "do" in and it talks about several actions in one go.

  • Here's an example for you: When I do the dishes, I wash them, I dry them, I put them away.

  • Notice there are three verbs.

  • I don't want to say when someone says, like E goes: "Did you do the dishes?"

  • Go: "Yes, I wash the dishes, I dry the dishes, I put the dishes away."

  • They'll go: -"You new to Canada, correct?"

  • -"Yes, very correct."

  • Okay, so I said: "I'll do the dishes" or "I do the dishes".

  • So, even under obligation I said: "I do the dishes every night", that's my obligation.

  • And it's these actions I'm talking about.

  • Repetitive because I do it every night, I repeat it.

  • Okay?

  • Multiple actions, so I've just went through, and replacement of verbs.

  • This is similar to multiple actions, but you can use the verb "to do" to replace one verb,

  • like: "Hey, man. I got to do my hair tonight."

  • That means "fix", that might be cut my hair, it might be wash my hair, but when I got to

  • do my hair, I got to do my hair, and do my nails.

  • That means cut and clean.

  • It's not saying multiple verbs.

  • It's just replacing one verb, but we can put "do" in there and it replaces that verb, and

  • we understand what it means.

  • Is there something you have to do?

  • Okay, I've killed that.

  • Right?

  • So why don't we go to "make"?

  • "Make".

  • "Make" is create, when you create something.

  • Creation comes from it didn't exist and now it does.

  • You create.

  • That's making.

  • And when I say "create", there's a big difference between the two.

  • Okay?

  • Notice when we talked about "do" we talked about repetitive, obligation, multiple actions,

  • dah-dah-dah-dah.

  • It's a verb of action and so is "make", but the difference is this: When I talk about

  • "do", you can't see it.

  • Sorry, you can see it, but you can't touch it.

  • You can see me washing, but you can't touch me washing the dishes.

  • It doesn't make sense.

  • You can see me washing the dishes, but you can't touch and go: "Now I have dry."

  • It's like: You can't have dry.

  • It's the action that I'm actually doing. Okay?

  • So when you keep these...

  • This in mind, yes, they're verbs of action and that's why you get confused, I understand,

  • but just keep in mind generally speaking with "do" you can see it, but you can't touch it.

  • And why am I bringing that back up?

  • Because with "make" it's almost the opposite.

  • When you create something it's in your hand, I can touch it, like this pen.

  • I made this pen, you can see it.

  • If you said: "Do you do this pen?"

  • It doesn't make sense to me.

  • I'm like: "It's in my hand, man.

  • I made it. It's done."

  • Right?

  • How do you make a pen?

  • That's different. All right?

  • Something you choose.

  • Huh?

  • You choose.

  • Make a decision already!

  • Right?

  • You got to choose it. Right?

  • Make a decision.

  • I have to put this one in here because you go: "Ah, well, you make a decision, I don't see it.

  • I don't see any decision."

  • But yeah, I have made up my mind, I've made a decision to make one path instead of another

  • one, and that will follow through.

  • Right?

  • Produce, well, similar to "create", but you know, when you make cars, it's regularly doing

  • it but you can see products coming out, like we make pens.

  • Okay?

  • So it's not...

  • "Create" is like the first time you created something.

  • The guy who made the first Apple computer.

  • Right?

  • He created it.

  • It was the first one, created.

  • But now he's producing them, he's making them, he's making many of them, more of them and

  • you can see them.

  • Speaking. Are you like a dog?

  • "Roof, roof". No.

  • Speaking.

  • It's been a little while, but there was a guy called Obama, Barack Obama.

  • Don't know if you've heard of him.

  • Anyway, he made a speech, and he said: "Yes we can" in the speech.

  • Notice how I said: He didn't do a speech, he made a speech.

  • Okay?

  • Because he produced ideas.

  • There comes that word again, another word going back.

  • As he spoke, these ideas were produced and people could understand them.

  • He even created a new environment.

  • So when we use "make" we can use it for speaking.

  • "Hey, don't make a noise."

  • See?

  • Okay?

  • Or: "Did you make a comment?"

  • In each of these cases you cannot say "do", you have to say "make" because something is

  • created or something is produced.

  • In this case, a sound.

  • So that's why we talk about "make" as in creating something for the first time; choosing something,

  • make your mind up, make a decision.

  • Producing, continually making something.

  • So after you've created the first one, we keep producing them, keep making them.

  • And speaking because noise is a sound and make it, and is a product.

  • It may not be physical you can touch, but it's something that's there.

  • Cool?

  • All right, and that's difference from just seeing the actions from "do".

  • Generally speaking, when you make something you can touch it.

  • I have to say generally because when I'm speaking like making a speech now, you can't touch

  • my words, but you can catch the sound. Right?

  • That's how we record things.

  • So, when we look over here, you can touch it, you make a cake.

  • Birthday cake, you make one.

  • You don't do it.

  • You make money.

  • I got no money.

  • I was looking for some.

  • I haven't make any money.

  • I might have to do something to make some money.

  • Right?

  • Notice how I used that?

  • Do something, several actions in order to get money, make it so I can show it to you

  • which I can't right now.

  • I need you to remember this before we go to the next board where I'm going to show you

  • some common collocations.

  • Okay? And collocations are basically words that go together.

  • There are words that go with "do" and there are words that go with "make", and this will help you.

  • Remember I said I want you to understand?

  • This will help make it easier for you that when you hear this word, you go:

  • "This is the word that goes with 'make'", or "This is the word that goes with 'do'", okay?

  • And you'll soon master our language.

  • So give me a sec and we'll get up there.

  • And don't forget native speakers always get this right, and so will you in about two seconds.

  • [Snaps]

  • And time to do collocations.

  • Collocations, as I mentioned before-remember?-it's words that usually go together.

  • In this case I picked a few that I know you'll hear once you learn English or if you're in

  • an English-speaking country, you'll hear people use these words a lot.

  • So let's go to the board.

  • I'll start off with "do" and housework.

  • Another word for "housework" is "chores".

  • You might hear a young kid say: "I got chores to do tonight, man.

  • I can't come out and play."

  • Or you go: "My household chores takes so long."

  • Chores is basically a job you have to do and you don't get paid for it.

  • So if you hear about chore, it's in your house or something you do, and you don't get paid for.

  • You don't have chores at work.

  • Keep that in mind. Okay?

  • Just a new vocabulary word for you.

  • And let's go to the board.

  • "Do the dishes".

  • Do you remember when I said that if you do something and you repeatedly have to do it,

  • repetitive manner, you do the dishes and I showed you wash, dry, put away?

  • That's an example of multiple verbs.

  • "Do the laundry" is the same thing.

  • You put the clothes in the washing machine, you wash them, you put them in the dryer or

  • you hang them up, then you fold them and put them away.

  • You'll notice that I said: "put", "fold", different verbs, another replacement.

  • "Do the yard work".

  • Yard?

  • Yarrr.

  • I'm not a pirate.

  • Yard, we call it the yard as in the backyard.

  • When you have a house...

  • I'm sure it's the same most places, but we can't say it's everywhere.

  • You have your little house here, okay?

  • You have some land here and here.

  • This is in the front, this is in the back.

  • Each part is called the yard.

  • Front yard.

  • Right? Where you usually have grass, maybe a tree.

  • If you're lucky, an apple tree if you're George Washington.

  • But you'll have a tree, some grass, and you can play.

  • The children can play soccer or football, or what have you.

  • Okay?

  • When you do the yard work sometimes it's cutting the grass, or it's playing with the flowers,

  • or you know, playing...

  • You know, you're playing with the flowers, pulling out weeds, you know, things from the

  • plants.

  • Doing yard work means to clean this area to make it look good.

  • It's like getting your hair done.

  • You know what I'm saying?

  • Okay, anyway, so you clean your house, the front and the back is to "do the yard word".

  • This is for housework, but you don't just live in your house, you also work.

  • And when we work...

  • Oh, sorry, I've got one before I forget, I put it in orange.

  • This is not for "Robin and Batman".

  • This is for "Ronnie".

  • Here's one we got called "make the bed", this usually goes with housework, but it actually

  • sits on the "make" side.

  • I'd love to go into great detail on it.

  • Actually, I'll give you my simple explanation in a second, but what I want to point out

  • is if you need further information on some of these, go check out Ronnie's video on housework,

  • and "do" and "make", okay?

  • My idea for make the bed I'll tell you when we get here with "make".

  • Now we go back to work.

  • Remember work?

  • Okay, work.

  • You "do homework", that's for school.

  • Right?

  • I do my homework.

  • It means I write, I read, I think, I remember, I bring the work back to school and give it

  • to the teacher.

  • Me.