Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • This is the Rachel’s English 30-day challenge: Learn 30 phrasal verbs in 30 days: jumpstart

  • your vocabulary in 2017.

  • Today is day 1, the first day of your 30-day challenge.

  • Well be studyingcrackphrasal verbs.

  • Since this is day 1 of your challenge, let’s start with a brief definition.

  • What is a phrasal verb?

  • A phrasal verb is a two-word, sometimes 3-word combination of a verb plus another word, usually

  • an adverb, like break up, or a preposition, like sleep on: Let me sleep on it.

  • These phrasal verbs have so many different meanings, and idiomatic meanings, figurative

  • meanings.

  • Theyre important to know because they pop up in conversation all the time.

  • Crack.

  • I like this one because we have down and up.

  • Down, up, these seem like opposites.

  • Butcrack downandcrack upare not opposites, they simply have two totally

  • separate meanings.

  • Crack downmeans to be more forceful, more severe in the enforcement of a punishment,

  • or of a rule.

  • For example: The police are cracking down on underage drinking.

  • Or: The university is cracking down on plagiarism.

  • When you put the two words together, they become a compound word, a noun.

  • Same idea: a ‘crackdownis a severe or stern enforcement of rules, laws, or regulations.

  • There’s been a crackdown on speeding.

  • It’s also the name of a video game.

  • Have you played it?

  • I have not.

  • Crack uphas nothing to do with rules, regulation, or enforcement.

  • It has several different meanings.

  • First, it has to do with mental health.

  • If you are not well, depressed or under pressure or anxious, and you have an event like a mental

  • breakdown or a psychotic break, youcrack up’.

  • She cracked up because of the pressure of her new job.

  • This can also be a one-word noun: He had a crackup during finals.

  • Or, he’s a crackup, he’s mentally ill.

  • Now, when you use it as a noun, “He’s a crack up”, it’s more harsh than saying

  • someone is mentally ill.

  • It’s kind of writing that person off.

  • There’s no sympathy for the illness when you call someone a crackup.

  • But it also has a meaning that’s very different: when something is hilarious, very funny, and

  • you laugh and laugh, you are cracking up.

  • That movie cracked me up.

  • I cracked up.

  • It’s also used in the phrasecracked up to be’, meaning, supposed to be, or expected.

  • He’s cracked up to be the greatest pitcher of all time.”

  • But usually the phrase is used in the negative, when something or someone doesn’t meet expectations,

  • it’s not all it’s cracked up to be.

  • Fame isn’t everything it’s cracked up to be.

  • The wordcrackstarts with the CR consonant cluster.

  • Cr-, cr-.

  • Your lips can form the R as you make the K sound with the back of the tongue, kr.

  • The front part of your tongue can also be in position, pulled up and back, for the R,

  • kr.

  • Then all you have to do is release the back of the tongue, cr-, cra-.

  • Then the AA vowel.

  • Lots of jaw drop for this one.

  • The back of the tongue lifts, the tip of the tongue stays down.

  • AA.

  • Cra-, crack.

  • And another K sound at the end, back of the tongue lifts up to touch the soft palate and

  • releases.

  • Kk.

  • Crack.

  • Crack.

  • To review, you can crack down on something when youre serious about the rules.

  • When you crack up, it can either mean youve had a bit of a mental break down, or the complete

  • opposite, youve laughed really hard at something.

  • It can also mean expected, and is usually used in the negative: making YouTube videos

  • isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

  • It looks simple, but each video takes so much time!

  • To catch all of the videos in this 30-day challenge, be sure to subscribe to my YouTube

  • channel and like Rachel’s English on Facebook.

  • Click the links in the description.

  • This 30-day challenge is leading up to a phrasal verbs course that will be available in my

  • online school on February 1.

  • Rachel’s English Academy is a collection of online courses focusing on English conversation,

  • pronunciation, and listening comprehension.

  • You will understand Americans better, and speak better English, with these courses.

  • Visit RachelsEnglishAcademy.com to sign up and get started today.

  • See the 30-day challenge playlist here and be sure to subscribe to my channel.

  • Keep in touch with details like my online school and courses by signing up for my mailing

  • list.

This is the Rachel’s English 30-day challenge: Learn 30 phrasal verbs in 30 days: jumpstart

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US crack cracked phrasal tongue challenge phrasal verb

PHRASAL VERB CRACK

  • 30 11
    Darren posted on 2017/05/15
Video vocabulary