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  • A Trump tweet last month said North Korea was behaving badly.

  • Now analysts say these satellite

  • pictures of its nuclear test site indicate that test number

  • six is now imminent. Since January,

  • North Korea's been test-firing long-range missiles.

  • One great unknown is how close it now is to being able to stick a nuke

  • on a rocket. The other is how to stop

  • the erratic, recalcitrant ruler of the world's most belligerent

  • country from careering lemming-like towards

  • nuclear holocaust. Trump's claim that he can,

  • with or without Chinese help, was less a threat to North Korea

  • and more an ultimatum to China. China has great influence over North

  • Korea and China will either decide to help us with North Korea or they

  • will not. If they do that will be good for China and if they don't, it

  • won't be good for anyone. If China is not going to solve North Korea,

  • we will. That is all I am telling you.

  • Last month, when his Secretary of State met President Xi

  • in Beijing, Rex Tillerson declared that the era of strategic

  • patience was over. Trump is now escalating his coercion

  • of China before his Xi Jinping summit on Thursday.

  • Asked by the FT if he meant he'd go it alone,

  • Trump said, totally. We are going to see President Trump

  • beach... Just yesterday though,

  • his Ambassador to the UN made clear that unilateralism

  • wasn't the game plan. What should we do about North Korea?

  • No longer take excuses from China they are concerned. They need to

  • show us how concerned they are and put pressure on North Korea. The

  • only country that can stop North Korea is China.

  • China keeps the Pyongyang regime running.

  • Beijing worries that too much pressure could lead

  • to conflict or regime collapse - both potentially catastrophic.

  • China still favours dialogue and cautiously

  • using its leverage. Nothing, so far, has worked.

  • Attempting regime change could be disastrous.

  • America plans to deploy a missile defence system

  • to protect South Korea, but that has irked Beijing a lot.

  • Meanwhile, combined military exercises involving US,

  • South Korean and Japanese troops have irked the paranoid

  • Pyongyang regime even more. A North Korean minister condemned

  • the war games and promised that Pyongyang would "mercilessly smash

  • and annihilate" its enemies and reduce the American

  • imperialists to ruins. As the Donald J Trump

  • regime seeks to define its policy towards that

  • of the young Kim Jong-un, none of the options is good.

  • Trump's projection of hard power has made China nervous

  • and with the stakes so high, he cannot afford to alienate

  • President Xi, Marshal Kim's only friend in the world.

  • Jonathan Miller reporting. Well Donald Trump has been

  • appearing before the media at the White House this afternoon.

  • Our Washington correspondent Kylie Morris joins me now.

  • It is a big week for diplomacy here but to say it is important to see

  • the comments on North Korea in the context of his meeting with the

  • president of China at the end of the week. President Trump is doing

  • diplomacy in the way he does business, he is the deal-maker,

  • starting with a belligerent statement and when it gets down to

  • it, softens his posture, which has been his approach so far. Unlike a

  • real estate deal this time he will be talking to the leader of a

  • strategic and economic superpower who is used to setting terms

  • himself. The final meeting in a big diplomacy week. King Abdullah of

  • Jordan is here this week. And today he welcomed the Egyptian President

  • al-Sisi, he used to be not welcome in this town, but suddenly Donald

  • Trump's oldest and dearest ally. President al-Sisi has been close to

  • me from the first time I met him. I met during the campaign and at that

  • point there were two of us and we met and hopefully we will a lot

  • more. It was a very long, it was supposed to be a brief meeting, and

  • we were with each other for a long period of time.

  • Finally making it to the White House after the coup he

  • led in 2013. The State Department last one criticises government for

  • failing to investigate abuses by security forces and contributing

  • they said to an environment of impunity. Today it is about security

  • and the fight against so-called Islamic State.

  • Thanks.

  • I am joined by Malcolm charmers. Is he being reckless or is this the

  • bold move that would break the cycle of non-diplomacy, diplomacy over

  • North Korea? The question of what

  • China will do has been central to North American policy for as long as

  • I remember and as long as I remember, American administrations

  • have found the costs of the war game is affordable.

  • Is he putting the pressure on China, sort this out or

  • I will? China has different

  • objectives from the US in relation to North Korea, China does not want

  • regime collapse. Therefore it is not prepared... It wants to put some

  • pressure on. It does not like what North Korea is doing. China has

  • sponsored more friendly North Korean leaders but in recent years, their

  • life expectancy has been short and China is running out of options,

  • like the Americans. We are joined

  • from Colorado by Christopher Hill.

  • The Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies

  • at the University of Denver The key question is, whether Donald

  • Trump is coming up with a bold move that will break the deadlock or

  • whether he is doing something reckless, wed EU stand on this

  • question? It is difficult to tell

  • whether he is going through the briefing book or saying what is on

  • his mind. He is making the point, look, we would like to work with

  • China. That statement was in there, but, if not, we will go it alone.

  • The key question is really what does he mean, go it alone? If he is

  • talking military options, we have the inconvenient fact 20 million

  • South Koreans live within artillery range of some 14,000 North Korean

  • artillery pieces. It is very true that all the war gaming suggests

  • there would be a lot of civilian casualties and if you went back

  • route you would have to work closely with the Republic of Korea and we

  • would not be going it alone. The more fruitful approach would be to

  • work with China and see if they could do more on sanctions and make

  • it clear that as long as there is a North Korean threat there will be US

  • missiles in South Korea, that the Chinese are upset about, but that is

  • tough, they will have to Axa that, as long as there is a North Korean

  • threat. The fundamental problem with China is they do not have consensus

  • on what to do in this situation. A lot of Chinese officials have

  • historical tie to North Korea and others don't and there is no

  • consensus. Is it also true China

  • would rather see a nuclear North Korea than a collapsed North Korea?

  • I think the Chinese have concerns about a collapsed North Korea and

  • worry if the US will put troops in the northern part of what we be a

  • unified peninsular. With the US put listening posts on the Chinese

  • border? A problem they have had with the missile system is the radar and

  • capability of looking into China, seeing various things going on in

  • China. They have concerns about what a unified Korea under a US ally

  • would mean. It behoves the Trump administration to reach some

  • understanding of what it would mean and not been because ultimately a

  • unified Korean peninsular is a better outcome than a nuclear North

  • Korea. You have Trump's rhetoric and the

  • Chinese upset about the change of balance and the North Koreans

  • throwing their toys out of the pram. It is very dangerous because the

  • longer the Americans delay, the worse the military options get and

  • North Korea is on a part in the next five to ten years of having probably

  • long-range missiles capable of delivering nuclear warheads on the

  • cantonment of the United States itself and no American President can

  • look at that prospect with any sense of anything but trepidation.

  • Christopher Hill, is North Korea the issue that would keep you up more

  • than anything in the Middle East, or indeed Russia?

  • Yes, any time we talk nuclear weapons, that is really what

  • is problematic. Lord knows, we have concerns about terrorism from the

  • Middle East. Compared to what a North Korean missile strike against

  • the mainland of the US could mean, it is truly the issue. And I

  • completely agree with the proposition that it is getting

  • tougher and tougher and the closer they get to a deliverable nuclear

  • weapon, the more difficult it is to dissuade them from this. I am of the

  • view that this really should be number one.

  • Briefly and finally, is Trump the right man to deal with the

  • situation in the way he is dealing with it?

  • Well, I have problems with making fake threats and not having

  • any idea what that means or how that would play out. I think the Chinese

  • look at Donald Trump and they kind of like the idea of a stronger

  • leader, but they are very worried about a leader who does not normally

  • crack his briefing book and does not appear to have a lot of substantive

  • background to draw on. That is

  • pretty damning! Thank you very much.

A Trump tweet last month said North Korea was behaving badly.

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B1 INT US north north korea korea china trump north korean

North Korea vs Trump explained: The latest as the US threatens military action against Kim Jong Un

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    annie   posted on 2017/04/09
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