Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • This is a spoiler warning. If you haven’t seen The Abominable Bride yet, please go and

  • watch it and then come back here for the post mortem.

  • Oh! Because like, post mortem as in-

  • As in dead people.

  • That’s clever.

  • Yeah.

  • Extraordinary.

  • Impossible.

  • Superb. Suicide as street theatre murder by a corpse.

  • Lestrade, youre spoiling us.

  • Watson, your hat and coat.

  • Where are we going?

  • To the morgue. There’s not a moment to loose. Which one can so rarely say of a morgue.

  • And am I just to sit here?

  • Not at all. My dear, I will be hungry later.

  • Holmes, one more thing. Tweeds, in a morgue?

  • Needs must when the devil drives Watson.

  • Hello, I’m Luke Spillane and welcome to 221D Baker Street. Yes, were right next

  • door to their flat for this very special Sherlock discussion show. Joining me for a canter for

  • the ins and outs

  • andwas that all in his mind palace?” of The Abominable Bride is BBC Sherlock France

  • Forum founder, Helene Coleen and ThomasTomskaRidgewell, YouTuber and comedian.

  • Welcome both.

  • Well, millions of people have seen this now in TV and cinemas around the world. Have you

  • found there has been a certain response to it on the forums?

  • Some people actually, so far have a good opinion on the episode so far as I have seen. Both

  • on Twitter and Facebook and even on the forum because we have some members who are

  • totally UK based, they were totally able to see the episode and comment on it. So far

  • the answer is very good.

  • Nice.

  • Are they excited byare they more excited about Moriarty coming back, the Victorian

  • setting or?

  • It was more the Victorian setting, yeah.

  • Great.

  • I know nothing of the social media response because I only got to see it last night so

  • I’ve avoided Twitter the entire time.

  • Great.

  • I have just back it out. I have a Sherlock blog on my Tumblr and I’m just likelalalalalala

  • What did we think of Holmes? A man out of his time, in his original Victorian setting?

  • Did you enjoy it?

  • I mean, it kind of goes without saying in that it obviously works. You know.

  • Yeah, it transitioned really naturally. I think it just all fit in. You didn’t really

  • have to change anything about the character. Honestly, Watson was a more interesting factor

  • in terms of the

  • difference between modern day and past because I love that they made Watson just a sexist.

  • Like, you know. Like Sherlock the character is naturally above it because he’s just

  • above all

  • things man but Watson was just in keeping with the times. LikeWoman, why do you

  • speak to me?, “Wife, make me tea.”. Like I think that was just a really interesting

  • kind of plot device,

  • that he was there to represent the patriarchy. With his moustache.

  • Yeah.

  • It’s a great moustache.

  • The moustache was really better than on series 3. Which was a bit ridiculous.

  • Also in this episode we got to see alternate versions of the some of our favourite characters.

  • What did we think of that? What were some of you favourites?

  • Technically theyre not alternate versions. Are they?

  • Theyre actual original versions.

  • That’s true, that’s true.

  • I mean, Mycroft was originally described in the books as being a large-

  • I think the exact words werefatty, fat man”.

  • Arthur Conan Doyle’s original words.

  • It was… I wasn’t expecting them to be this far but yeah it was actually fun and

  • I really loved Molly as a man. She was really good.

  • Are we supposed to believe that Sherlock wouldn’t notice that?

  • Yeah. I don’t know.

  • Like, of all things.

  • Because everyone is likeYup, that isyeah.”

  • And Sherlock is likeHuh?”

  • I quite like that though because in the modern version he’s always blind to her.

  • Yeah, I guess that’s very fair.

  • Like the fact that he’s blind to this girl dressed up as a boy. I loved that. I think

  • it was really sweet.

  • Yeah, I guess. Because in the modern version he doesn’t even acknowledge her as a woman.

  • Just as a sexual being. In this he’s not even acknowledging her sex as well. Yeah.

  • it worked really well. It was just very funny.

  • Yeah.

  • It was very Black Adder. Bob.

  • So as it turns out this wasn’t really a stand alone special but it was all inside

  • Sherlock’s mind palace. What did we think of the big twist? Did we enjoy it? What did

  • we think?

  • The episode started so well in Victorian era. Just having this in his imagination of his

  • mind, well I kind of lost interest in what was going on after that because it was just

  • a dream.

  • I mean, I don’t think my feelings were quite as harsh but I can see where youre coming

  • from though.

  • Personally though, I am canonically choosing to you know, believe that modern day Sherlock

  • is just an imagination of actual Sherlock.

  • Victorian Sherlock.

  • This may notwe weren’t watching alternate Sherlock. We were watching Sherlock and he

  • was just imagining what the future is like because he’s so smart. He’s exactly right.

  • Great. Jet planes, everything.

  • I’m canonicallyany Sherlock I watch from this point onwards is cannon for me now.

  • I think you made an interesting point in thatonce I knew it was a mind palace I think flicking

  • in between because quite… I kind of almost, like we were saying, wanted the indulgence

  • and

  • the enjoyment of victorian England to stay for longer before we saw modern day. I almost

  • wish that it was a twist at the end.

  • Well, in this episode we saw the return of Moriarty. In fact the whole episode turned

  • out to be his return. Now you said that you were thrilled to see his return. You were

  • happy then? I loved

  • seeing him back?

  • Always.

  • Yup.

  • Always.

  • I love Andrew Scott. Overtime he come back to the series I’m really thrilled because

  • he ishe is kind of the best Moriarty I’ve seen so far, so.

  • What I love, what I love about the what theyve done with the character Moriarty is the way

  • that theyve been able to keep him alive, keep Andrew Scott in the show is that he does

  • live in

  • Sherlock’s head now becauseand I guess the whole idea behind that is he bested Sherlock,

  • Sherlock has now made him thishe projects onto him. He’s made him this

  • manifestation of all of his insecurities so whenever he’s downing himself it manifests

  • itself as Moriarty and that’s awesome because it just means we can keep having Andrew Scott

  • I hope. That’s great.

  • And with that, did you enjoy seeing the waterfall confrontation? We finally saw the original

  • Reichenbach. How exciting was that to see? Because personally that was one of my favourite

  • scenes in the whole thing. Did you enjoy that?

  • Yeah. Especially after when I saw that it was filming in the studio so it was actually

  • very impressive when I saw the pictures of what the set was looking like. It would have

  • looked

  • better if it was at that moment he woke up instead of a bit before.

  • Yeah, he jumps off and then he wakes up and he’s likeyeah, ok cool.”

  • I think the craziness of it, it was a crazy scene. But also I thought there was kind of

  • this tension. Weve never just seen them just fight. Like you kind of just wanted them

  • just to have

  • a fight. I quite enjoyed the tension of both of them just hating each other but loving

  • each other. I mean Sherlock resorts to name calling first. He resorts to calling himshort

  • assand

  • Moriarty does not like that. It’s obviously a very sore spot for Moriarty.

  • But it’s just the noise he makes.

  • [Hissing noise]

  • It just got me.

  • It’s great.

  • At the heart of The Abominable Bride case was a good old fashioned ghost story which

  • is very, very Victoriana I think. Different from what weve seen in modern Sherlock.

  • In modern

  • Sherlock the closest weve probably seen to that is in the Baskervilles episode, we

  • kind of had that horror and almostis this a fantasy”-

  • Supernatural.

  • Yeah, a supernatural element to it.

  • Did we enjoy the horror aspect of this and the ghost side of it?

  • Yeah, I think Mark is really a great when he actually writes that kind of thing. I think

  • it’s one of his best qualities is to write horror episode like that. He does it very

  • well on Doctor Who too.

  • So I really enjoy those.

  • I think like in The Hound of the Baskervilles, that sequence with the ghost and around the

  • maze and in the grounds, like you really are goingWhat is going on here?”. I was

  • so on the

  • edge of my seat during that. It was so gripping and I didn’t know what was going to happen

  • next. It was just nice to be so in the dark aboutlike you say. You worked it out.

  • Youre

  • clever than all of us Tom. But I was likeIs she a ghost? I’m confused. What s

  • this?”. So I thought that whole sequence was very gripping.

  • Yeah, I was interested in how they were doing it. There was part of me that was like “I’m

  • really hoping ittwins.”.

  • Yeah, yes.

  • It just felt very old-timey. It felt like what Watson’s writing was supposed to be

  • in that it felt, you know, like a Penny Dreadful likeWere in the maze and there’s

  • a ghost and it’s all very

  • spookyand it felt like whatSherlock is supposed to be from Watson’s perspective.

  • It’s hard to explain but it was good. It was good times.

  • Well, there were some fantastic set pieces in this which I think is a real stable of

  • Sherlock for me because one of my favourite moments was Lestrade’s telling of the case

  • and that freeing

  • on the street moment. Did we enjoy the set pieces? Because for me the sequence in the

  • street, it reminded me of in the Irene Adler episode, Belgravia, we had that. He was in

  • the

  • room and then he stooped down and he was in the car and he was in that field working out

  • the case. I love moments like that. Seeing Baker Street on the street. It just looks

  • great.

  • It was. I had a very nerdy moment right at the start when they rolled the time back and

  • you see the bride pulling out 1887 single action army revolvers. I was likeOh, careful

  • guys. They

  • didn’t come out until 1887 so you better be after 1887 right now or youre going

  • to get into trouble.”.

  • So when we see Sherlock wake up in this plane, weve spoken about it already in terms of

  • the narrative but were we excited to return to modern day Sherlock? Because I don’t

  • think we

  • expected to see, going into this episode beforehand, I didn’t expect to see modern day Sherlock

  • at all.

  • Yeah, it was actually nice to have the episode not being a standalone episode but following

  • series 3 and opening series 4.

  • I don’t remember all these characters being so nice though. Like, Mycroft was really nice

  • in that scene. He was likeKeep him safe,

  • Watson.”. It was like, “What? Didn’t Mycroft just send

  • Sherlock off to die literally minutes prior?”.

  • Because in series 3 he was likeWe need him back because he’s the only-“

  • But minutes prior he’s only just put him on that plane now he’s likeNow I’ve

  • got to get you a pardon.”. Couldn’t he have done that to begin with?

  • Yeah.

  • Mycroft was just really nice. It just felt very strange.

  • So let’s talk about that ending then. The Abominable Bride being the invisible enemy.

  • That final scene in-

  • She was feminism.

  • Is that the reveal? What did we think of the ending?

  • Yeah, I like that it was the feminist illuminati. Like it was very silly but it was fun for

  • that episode.

  • Yeah, I quite liked that resolution like obviously as you say the silliness of it because you

  • know, this is all within Sherlock’s mind palace and it’s John writing out the narrative

  • events of-

  • It’s John Watson’s Penny Dreadful depiction of what a feminist illuminati would look like.

  • Yeah.

  • Because even Conan Doyle himself at the time wasn’t exactly supportive of the Suffragettes

  • or feminism so it does make sense.

  • Yeah, they would be played up as this spooky, scary group of conspiracy theorists. Crazy

  • people, yeah.

  • Weve now recently know that Sherlock got away from the fall with the help of Molly.

  • That’s mentioned very briefly at the end.

  • Was that news?

  • Yeah.

  • I thought we always new that.

  • Because in series 3 it was never confirmed which one of the ways that he got out of the

  • fall was the real one.

  • Right.

  • I think it was always going to be Molly because access to cadavers and like-

  • Yeah.

  • And we know now Moriarty is dead, no question. But what’s going to happen next? How excited

  • are we for what’s next and where do we think the show is going to go?

  • What’s next for Sherlock?

  • I’m glad that like, we got some Moriarty without him actually coming back. I’m glad

  • that he’s dead. I hope he doesn’t come back. I hope he stays in Sherlock’s head.

  • Absolutely. Because

  • like season 3 episode 1 where it was all aboutHow does he get out of it?” and it’s

  • all likeDoesn’t matter.”, “OK”. And this was like that for Moriarty. Like

  • How is Moriarty going to

  • come back?”, “He’s not.”. And that’s great. The Sherlock’s lineNo, he’s

  • definitely dead.”, basically looks down to camera.

  • Moriarty is dead, no question.

  • Which was good. Which I kind of figured at the end of season 3 anyway. It’s likeOK,

  • he’s going to have pre-recorded some amazing thing because he’s just the world’s greatest

  • villainfor some reason and I’m not complaining.

  • And Redbeard? What does Redbeard mean? Could Mycroft-

  • I mean, Redbeard we know is Sherlock’s dog when he was younger. We saw that at the end

  • of series 3.

  • Right.

  • I missed that.