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  • Hi I'm Sam.

  • Welcome to Oxford Online

  • English!

  • In this lesson, you can learn

  • what a vocabulary notebook is, why it's

  • useful for learning vocabulary more

  • quickly, and how to use it.

  • Part one: why should you use a vocabulary

  • notebook.

  • A vocabulary notebook is a small

  • book where you can record new words.

  • The

  • best vocabulary notebook is small enough

  • to put in your pocket, so you can carry

  • it everywhere with you, like this.

  • Remembering new vocabulary is something

  • that many students find difficult.

  • To

  • really know a word means that you're able

  • not just to recognize it, but to use it

  • correctly.

  • But how can you go from

  • recognizing and understanding a word to

  • using it well in your English speaking

  • and writing?

  • You need to form a long-term

  • memory of the word or phrase you're

  • trying to remember.

  • When you learn new

  • words in class, or during self study, it's

  • in your short-term memory.

  • You're able to

  • recognize and even use the word during

  • your studies, and maybe even for a short

  • time afterwards, but then you may forget

  • it.

  • You need to move the word into your

  • long-term memory.

  • The only way to do this is to see, hear,

  • and use the word many times.

  • So then, why

  • is a vocabulary notebook helpful for

  • expanding your vocabulary more quickly?

  • A vocabulary notebook is an excellent tool

  • to help you move new words from your

  • short-term to your long-term memory.

  • You

  • can use it to record and review the

  • vocabulary, enabling you to see, hear and

  • use the vocabulary many times, which will

  • help you to remember it.

  • But how do you use avocabulary

  • notebook?

  • There are lots of different

  • ways to use a vocabulary network but

  • two things are important: record and review.

  • Part two: how to record the meaning of new

  • vocabulary.

  • Let's look at recording vocabulary.

  • When

  • you learn new vocabulary, record it

  • instantly.

  • That means write it down at

  • that moment.

  • The physical act of writing

  • it down can help you to remember it

  • later.

  • So, whether you're in class, studying at

  • home, or out and about, the best thing to

  • do is to record the word when you learn

  • it;

  • don't wait until later!

  • There are four

  • easy steps.

  • The first step is recording

  • words clearly and correctly.

  • This may

  • sound obvious but many students find

  • they're unable to read their own notes, or

  • they record and then learn words with incorrect

  • spelling.

  • So, always check how words are spelt.

  • So, what

  • else do you need to record?

  • The second

  • step is to record the meaning of the

  • vocabulary.

  • There are a number of ways to

  • do this depending on the word or phrase

  • that you want to learn.

  • Let's use our example, 'soup'.

  • Do you think

  • writing 'pea or chicken' will help you to

  • remember the meaning of this word?

  • It's

  • true that pea and chicken are examples of

  • soup, but writing down the meaning like

  • this might not help you to remember what

  • 'soup' means.

  • However, I'm quite sure most

  • countries have soup, so translation is a

  • quick and clear way to show the meaning

  • of 'soup'.

  • I speak a little Turkish, so I'll

  • use that.

  • In Turkish, 'soup' is 'รงorba'

  • Many students also find that drawing

  • pictures helps them to remember words.

  • Put the

  • picture on the right-hand page for

  • meaning.

  • For simple words like 'soup',

  • recording the translation your own

  • language is okay.

  • However, many words don't have a direct

  • translation.

  • For this reason it's usually

  • better to record the meaning in English.

  • But, use your own words; don't just copy

  • the meaning from the dictionary.

  • This will make it easier for you to

  • understand and remember the meaning.

  • Let's do an example.

  • Do you know the word

  • 'tasty'?

  • It describes food that has a strong

  • taste or flavour.

  • We can also say that this is a positive

  • objective, similar to 'delicious', so we can

  • write a positive symbol next to the

  • meaning.

  • With adjectives, it's also a good

  • idea to record the opposite.

  • We can use

  • this sign for opposite.

  • The opposite of

  • 'tasty' is 'tasteless'.

  • It describes food that

  • has no flavour.

  • This is a negative adjective, so we can

  • write a negative symbol next to the

  • meaning.

  • Hopefully, now you have a good idea of

  • how to record meaning in your notebook.

  • Using a vocabulary notebook is a

  • learning process, and should be personal

  • to you, so experiment with different

  • ways of recording meaning.

  • But, however you

  • decide to record meaning, one thing is

  • important: it must be clear to you when

  • you come back to it.

  • So, there are four

  • steps to recording vocabulary: first,

  • record the word clearly and correctly;

  • second: record the meaning.

  • What's next?

  • Part three: how to record the form of new vocabulary.

  • Ask yourself or your teacher: is your

  • new vocabulary a noun, a verb, an adjective, an idiom?

  • Remember that phrases

  • can be nouns or verbs too, so this is

  • true for both words and phrases.

  • If it's a noun, is it countable or uncountable?

  • Make a note so that you understand how to

  • use it.

  • You can record the form in

  • brackets next to the word.

  • Here,

  • 'soup' is a noun, so you can write 'n' after

  • it.

  • 'Soup' can be countable or uncountable.

  • You

  • can show this by writing C/U.

  • You can put adj. to show that 'tasty'

  • and 'tasteless' are adjectives.

  • It's helpful to use abbreviations to

  • record form.

  • Here are some examples.

  • n. is for noun.

  • v. is for verb.

  • C is for countable.

  • U is for uncountable.

  • adj. is for adjective

  • adv. is for adverb.

  • Capital 'I' capital 'D' is for idiom.

  • mwv means multi-word verb.

  • Abbreviations help you to record form

  • quickly and use less space in your

  • notebook.

  • So, when recording vocabulary,

  • you should: record it clearly and

  • correctly, record the meaning, record the

  • form.

  • There's one more thing you should record.

  • Part four: how to record the pronunciation

  • of new vocabulary.

  • You're learning

  • English.

  • That means you know how

  • confusing and irregular English

  • pronunciation can be.

  • That's why you

  • should record some details about the

  • pronunciation of words.

  • You could: write

  • the sounds in phonetics, mark stressed

  • syllables, mark any silent syllables or

  • letters, and record any difficult or

  • irregular sounds.

  • For example, students sometimes confuse

  • the pronunciation of 'soup' with 'soap'.

  • So, the vowel sound here is important.

  • This is the symbol for the 'oo' sound.

  • You don't have to use phonetic symbols,

  • but they can help you to remember

  • the correct pronunciation of words.

  • Vowel

  • sounds are a good place to start.

  • You can write

  • the 'oo' sound under the letters that

  • make that sound.

  • The word 'tasty' has more

  • than one syllable, so you should record

  • the stress in the word.

  • You can do this by underlining the vowel

  • where the stress is.

  • In 'tasty',

  • the stress is on 'a' Some students may

  • also find it helpful here to record the

  • vowel sound; the vowel sound is 'ay': tasty.

  • In

  • speech, the second t in 'tasteless' is

  • silent.

  • You can show this by writing a small

  • cross under the second 't': tasteless.

  • So, now we have the basic information we

  • need to record.

  • We've written the word

  • clearly and correctly, and we've checked

  • the spelling.

  • We've also recorded the meaning, the form

  • and the pronunciation of the words.

  • You

  • may notice that I've used different colours.

  • It's helpful to use colour in your notes,

  • and to be consistent.

  • That means always using the same colour

  • for the same thing.

  • You could use

  • different colours for different parts of

  • speech, as I've done here: my nouns are

  • black and my adjectives are red.

  • You could use different colours for verbs and

  • adverbs, too.

  • This helps you understand and

  • remember the form of the word quickly.

  • Also, using a different colour for your

  • pronunciation notes helps them stand out.

  • I

  • always use green.

  • Finally, you might want to add some

  • information to your notes later, do

  • leave some space.

  • What else might you want to add?

  • You'll see