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  • To be, or not to be - that is the...

  • Hi. James from engVid.

  • Just practicing my Shakespeare.

  • Well, not really.

  • I just wanted to show you acting.

  • Acting, being an actor can be a good way to learn English.

  • And today I want to show you two fun ways to practice English doing things you already

  • love to do.

  • Okay?

  • So, let's go to the board.

  • Mr. E is saying: "I sound like Madonna!"

  • That's not here yet, but that'll be the second one, but today or right now this part of the

  • lesson is about movies, acting.

  • What we want you to do or what I want you to do is go find a movie you love in English.

  • I'm sure there's...

  • If you're watching me, I'm sure you've watched some English television program or movie.

  • I mean, I'm speaking a lot of English so I know you're used to it.

  • What I...

  • What I want you to do is pretend you are an actor in a movie, and we're going to take

  • a few steps to get there.

  • So the first thing is: Pick a movie that you love watching, because some of you watch it

  • again and again. Star Wars, yeah, yeah?

  • Or Harry Potter, if that's still out there, or Bond, James Bond.

  • Right? Any of those movies.

  • Okay, so you pick your movie.

  • The second thing I want you to do is go through the movie and watch the scenes you love the

  • best when the actor says something like:

  • "Punk, do you feel lucky, punk? Well, do ya?"

  • And then pick a couple of those scenes.

  • All right?

  • The third thing I want you to do is go to this part, and it's i-m...

  • It's www.imsdb.com.

  • It's where you get scripts.

  • Now, right now you're probably going: "What's a script?"

  • Well, in music the words in the music are called lyrics. Okay?

  • So when you're looking at the words in a song they're called the lyrics.

  • But when you're looking at the words in a movie, it's from a script.

  • And one actor has his part in a script, another actor has her part in a script.

  • And these are the lines they say.

  • This particular website has amazing amount...

  • An amazing amount of movies with scripts, so you can go and find any of the latest ones,

  • like of Jason Bourne, or I'm trying to think of something that came out.

  • I don't know when you're going to see this, so just say Harry Potter, maybe Ironman. Okay?

  • Go check it out, you'll see the scripts, you can go and look at it.

  • The reason why I asked you up here is to pick out scenes is you can go to the scene on the

  • script where it may say: "Car chase scene", "Gun scene", "Kissing scene", and you can

  • look at it, and all of the words the actors say are there.

  • Because I know sometimes you don't know what the actor is actually saying.

  • Sometimes we have what's called relaxed speech.

  • In relaxed speech, they might say: "What do you want?" and it comes out: "Whatda ya want?"

  • And you're like: "What?" It's English.

  • Now, we have a video on relaxed speech, you can go and check it out, and it will explain:

  • "Whatda ya want?" and other ones. Okay?

  • So, the lines that will be there, you might notice a big difference between what the actor

  • says and what is actually written for what you should explain or you should understand.

  • Okay?

  • This is good, it's going to help you with your ears as well.

  • There's a thing you can pick up from listening.

  • Okay? So we want to look at the scripts and then listen.

  • Now, watch the movie at your favourite part.

  • So now you've got the script in your hand, you're going to watch that part. Read.

  • Here's the funny thing, a lot of times people read when they're watching a movie, like they

  • read the subtitles-you know the little words?-and they think:

  • "My listening is good because I understand."

  • No, you're reading, but it does help because it helps you put a picture, a word picture

  • to the words you're hearing.

  • And we're much better with pictures.

  • Think of it this way: Have you ever walked up to someone and said: "I remember your name,

  • but I don't remember your face."

  • No, you don't do that.

  • We always remember faces and we forget names.

  • Those kind of words and sounds are hard to remember, but the picture we always keep.

  • Seeing a word picture or a word "dog" and then seeing a dog is easier to remember dog

  • and the picture of the dog together.

  • So now you get to look at the words, and see them, and see the person saying it.

  • It's easier for you to remember, or another word is recall.

  • Okay? So watch that a couple of times.

  • Watch how they say it, watch their mouths and read the words.

  • Try to get it at the same speed so as you're reading, they're talking.

  • Cool?

  • Now, here's the fun part.

  • I want you to repeat the script with the movie.

  • So if we were doing this now, if I were saying: "How are you, brown cow?"

  • You would be reading: "How are you, brown cow?" and you try and copy me.

  • So if I went: "How are you, brown cow?"

  • you'd have to say: "How are you, brown cow?

  • How are you, brown cow?

  • How are you, brown cow?"

  • And so you can match me.

  • The funny thing about trying to copy someone is that you stop thinking in your language,

  • and as you're trying to copy your accent will drop off, especially when you're trying to

  • match their speed.

  • And you'll notice that your accent is gone and you sound more like an American, or an

  • Englishman, or I don't know, a person from Vietnam.

  • Be careful which language you pick.

  • I might say: Pick American/British actors first.

  • You don't want to sound like a Russian.

  • Okay?

  • Russian is very good, I like them a lot, they're good people, but if you're trying to learn

  • English accent like American, it's not good way to start.

  • Okay?

  • So after you get good at the English and Americans, then pick your French accent.

  • Yes, you can be a lover.

  • Or an Italian accent.

  • But first, English and American.

  • Okay? So try and match the speed and the way that the other speaker

  • or the actor is speaking. Okay?

  • Now, copy the actor as much as possible, maybe even a gesture, because sometimes using your hands...

  • Like when some people, they talk like this, they start acting like...

  • And the accent comes out because they know it's a different culture.

  • I know it's crazy, but just try it.

  • It's fun. What's the worst that can happen?

  • You watch your favourite movie.

  • Now, there are a couple of things I want to talk about very quickly on this.

  • Number one, share the fun.

  • You can have a friend get another part of the movie and you can talk to each other.

  • -"Hey, Johnny, what's going on?"

  • -"Yeah, Beany, I haven't seen you in a while."

  • -"Johnny, I told you, don't call me B-..."

  • See? And you can have fun together.

  • Laugh, watch a movie, have some fun, work on your English, getting rid of that accent.

  • Okay? Cool?

  • And the second thing is: Look for language or I say sound patterns.

  • "Whatda ya" is "What do you?"

  • How we have some words that have certain patterns that are repeated again and again.

  • By watching the movie again and again, that part, you'll start learning these sound patterns

  • and you'll notice you don't have to say each word.

  • How do I know you're not a native English speaker?

  • You say to me: "What are you doing, teacher?"

  • instead of: "Whatda ya doing, teacher?"

  • See?

  • A sound pattern.

  • And you can take that: "Whatda ya" for many things.

  • Cool?

  • All right. I promised you one fun way, and I'm sure you're enjoying watching your movie.

  • You're looking forward to the second one?

  • Let's do it.

  • [Snaps]

  • All right, so we did movies and you were an actor, and I want to add on something a little

  • different now.

  • I want to sing.

  • Life is a mystery, you probably don't know what I'm doing.

  • It's my horrible Madonna rendition.

  • Madonna, don't be angry.

  • Okay, I just drop that.

  • Anyway, the second way to get really good at sounding like a native spinger...

  • Spinger?

  • Spinger.

  • Speaker is to sing.

  • Why?

  • With the acting, a lot of movies are based on everyday events.

  • I don't care if it's Star Wars or somewhere else, they still talk about eating, going

  • to the washroom, and problems and relationships.

  • So a lot of the normal vocabulary and verbiage we use, they use in the movies.

  • They have to.

  • If they started talking about exponential quantum...

  • And that's all, people would stop watching, they wouldn't understand it.

  • So that's a reason...

  • A good reason to go to movies.

  • It gives you a lot of useful everyday phrases that you can take and use.

  • Singing is different.

  • I want to do this for a different reason.

  • It's the difficulty with language.

  • Saying: "I love you" is easy, but: "I love you" is hard.

  • It makes you really, really take time to exaggerate the sound and learn the sound.

  • Because when I say: "learn", I have to shape my mouth.

  • I'm more conscious of what I'm doing or I know what I'm doing, and because of that I

  • can repeat it.

  • Ah, yeah. See?

  • When you go: "Ohhhh", then you can make a perfect "oh" any time.

  • Say: "Uh", and you have no idea what you just did.

  • So, let's go to the board.

  • Sing for your supper.

  • We like to say over here: "Sing for your supper" is if you want to eat, you got to do something,

  • you got to work.

  • And this one's going to be a bit more work.

  • Still going to be fun, though.

  • The first thing I want you to do is think about all...

  • Think about all of those songs, English songs you sing.

  • And I love it because I have a lot of students, and I find it amazing how someone who can

  • talk like this all the time suddenly when they get a song they sound like this:

  • "I'm singing in the rain".

  • You're like: "Where are you from, man?

  • You don't sound like..."

  • They drop their accent because they copy the singer.

  • And because it's difficult to sing what the singer is doing, they actually learn something

  • new, they change what they've been taking in.

  • They become much more flexible with language.

  • So get one of your favourite songs.

  • Right? Pick one or two you want to work with, because yes, as much as it's fun, it's going to be work.

  • Okay?

  • Now, you can go to www.YouTube.com.

  • There's a good chance you're watching this on YouTube right now if you're not watching

  • on engVid, so you can watch it on engVid-hi-and if not, you're going to have to get off and

  • go to YouTube.

  • And you can still see me, we can continue from there.

  • Okay?

  • Cool.

  • But go to www.YouTube.com.

  • I recommend it because I know a lot of them...

  • They have a lot of songs with lyrics.

  • Lyrics, they are the words in songs.

  • When I said scripts are the words in movies, well, the lyrics are the words in songs, all

  • those words you're singing.

  • So they have a lot of videos that will have the lyrics, so you can watch a video and see

  • the words come up.

  • Okay? Number three: Listen first.

  • Huh?

  • In the movie I said listen and read.

  • When it comes to music you have to listen because they really change the sounds of the

  • words and you kind of have to know what they are.

  • I'll give you a good example.

  • Have you ever heard or been to a bar, or what have you, and you hear your favourite song

  • and it's like: "Jump! Jump!

  • Everybody, jump!

  • [Makes noise] Jump!

  • Jump!"

  • You know that: "[Makes noise]" because you don't know the words.

  • It's in your own language and you have no idea what the guy said, so you're like: "Jump!

  • Jump! Yeah, [makes noise], yeah, yeah.

  • Jump! Jump!"

  • Hey, in English, I don't care what language, it's the same.

  • Okay? So you have to listen first to get the language.

  • Remember we talked about sound patterns?

  • You got to get that sound pattern so when you can see it on the paper you can say:

  • "Oh, jump up and do-" that's what they're saying.

  • Okay?

  • So listen first.

  • Okay? And as I said, singing is more difficult than talking.

  • Okay? And next I want you to read the lyrics, just like what we did with the movie.

  • Okay? So almost what we did with the movie before we're going to do after.

  • Listen to him, copy, or her, and then try to sing with them.

  • Okay?

  • And then karaoke time.

  • I don't think you know this, but YouTube has a karaoke version of songs.

  • That's right.

  • You can put the song up, just the music, and sing to it.