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  • The eight traits successful people have in common.

  • Number one: passion.

  • Successful people love what they do.

  • When I asked Russell Crowe what led to his Academy Award for Best Actor,

  • he said, "The bottom line is I love the actual job of acting.

  • I have a great passion for it."

  • Successful people in all fields love what they do,

  • whether it's astrophysicist Jaymie Matthews, author J.K. Rowling

  • or athlete Michael Phelps.

  • And not just big names -- Margaret MacMillan, a history professor,

  • says, "I spent my life doing what I loved."

  • Carlos, a bus driver I sit with at Starbucks,

  • says, "I love what I do. I've only missed three days in four years."

  • And believe it or not, even successful dentists love what they do.

  • Izzy Novak says, "I love dentistry.

  • I can't imagine being anything else."

  • But what about business?

  • Many of you are in business,

  • and we tend to think that business is more about cold numbers than hot passion,

  • more about logic than love,

  • so what surprised me was how often successful business people

  • actually use the words "passion" or "love" when they talk about their work.

  • When Jack Welch was CEO of General Electric,

  • he was asked if he liked his job.

  • He said, "No, I don't like this job. I love this job."

  • We can have passion for a profession.

  • Kathleen Lane, chief strategist at WorkCar,

  • says, "I've found a profession I love."

  • She also says, "Stress isn't working 15 hours at a job you like,

  • stress is working 15 minutes at a job you dislike."

  • We can have a passion for people.

  • Nez Hallett III, CEO of Smart Wireless,

  • says, "I used to be in sales. Now I'm a CEO.

  • I just love being around people."

  • We can have passion for a product.

  • James Dyson, the vacuum cleaner guy, says,

  • "I love vacuum cleaners, and I will love them until the day I die."

  • (Laughter)

  • Yup, when he dies, they're just going to cremate him and suck up those ashes

  • with a Dyson vacuum, and place it on the shelf.

  • (Laughter)

  • We can have passion for a particular field.

  • Anita Roddick, the great founder of The Body Shop,

  • once said, "I love retailing.

  • I love buying and selling and making connections."

  • She also said, "I don't like systems, financial sheets or plans."

  • Yes, no matter how much we love what we do,

  • there's always going to be stuff we don't love.

  • The trick is to make sure the stuff you don't love only takes up 20 percent of your time,

  • and the stuff you do love takes up 80.

  • If it's the other way around, we're in the wrong job.

  • Passion is sometimes mistaken for ambition.

  • People call Donald Trump ambitious,

  • but he says, "I'm not ambitious. I just love what I do.

  • And if you love what you do, you do a lot of stuff.

  • And then people say, 'Oh, you're ambitious.'"

  • The cool thing about passion is it turns underachievers into superachievers.

  • I have a long list of famous underachievers --

  • like Albert Einstein -- who people said would go nowhere when they were young.

  • For instance, who said this, besides me?

  • "I was sitting in my room being a depressed guy,

  • trying to figure out what I was doing with my life."

  • Turns out it was Bill Gates.

  • Bill was such an underachiever,

  • his parents actually sent him to counseling.

  • Yeah, I can just hear the neighbors back then saying,

  • "Jeez, that Gates kid. What a loser.

  • He's never going to go anywhere." And he didn't,

  • until he discovered his passion for software.

  • The big problem is finding your passion.

  • Sure, there's the kid that knows they want to be an accountant or an architect

  • or an astronaut from the time they're 10,

  • but I found a much bigger group of successful people who,

  • when they were young, and even when they were older,

  • didn't have a clue what their passion was,

  • and it took them a long time to find it

  • or to fall into it.

  • Dawn Lepore, Chief Information Officer at Charles Schwab,

  • said to me, "I fell into what I do,

  • and I didn't know I loved it until I fell into it."

  • And I hear that a lot.

  • So how do people find their passion?

  • Well they just get out there and try a lot of stuff

  • and explore many paths.

  • Robert Munsch explored many paths.

  • He said to me, "I studied to be a priest

  • and that turned out to be a disaster.

  • I tried working on a farm. They didn't like me.

  • I worked on a boat. It sank.

  • I tried a lot of things that didn't work,

  • but I kept trying and then I tried something that did work."

  • And I'd say it worked; as a children's author, he's sold over 40 million books.

  • Yes, finding a job we love is like finding a person we love.

  • Sometimes we've just got to go on a lot of really bad dates

  • before we find the right one.

  • Now, I read a survey of 18- to 25-year-olds,

  • and 81 percent said their first or second life goal

  • was to get rich.

  • And I thought, boy, they've got it all wrong.

  • Because I've interviewed many millionaires and billionaires,

  • and guess how many of them said their life goal was to get rich?

  • Zero! They didn't do it for money,

  • they did it for love. They went for the zing,

  • not the ka-ching ka-ching.

  • When Bill Gates and Paul Allen started Microsoft,

  • they didn't do it for the money.

  • Bill says, "Paul and I never thought we'd make much money.

  • We just loved writing software."

  • And with that attitude, he became the richest man in the world.

  • J.K. Rowling didn't write Harry Potter books for the money.

  • She said, "I love writing these books.

  • I just wanted to make enough money to continue to write."

  • And with that attitude, she became a billionaire.

  • I became a millionaire by following my heart, not my wallet,

  • and a number of times I walked away from great-paying jobs

  • to do poor-paying jobs I loved better.

  • Once was when I had a great job, traveling the world, making a lot of money,

  • but I wasn't doing the one thing I loved at the time,

  • which was photography.

  • So I said, I think I'll leave and start my own little photo company.

  • My heart said, Yeah! Go for it.

  • My wallet, and all my friends, I might add,

  • said, Are you crazy? You can't walk away from all the money!

  • You'll starve.

  • I didn't listen to them. I walked away,

  • and yeah, at first there wasn't much money,

  • but it didn't matter, because I was having fun doing what I loved.

  • And eventually, the money came,

  • and much more than if I'd stayed in my old job.

  • So I learned it's true, what they say:

  • If you do what you love, the money comes anyway.

  • So I'd say if you really want to get rich,

  • put money at the bottom of your goals list and passion at the top.

  • And why does it work that way?

  • Because if you love what you do, you automatically do the other seven things

  • that lead to success and wealth.

  • You will work hard, you will push yourself, you will persist.

  • And what if you're in a job you don't love?

  • Well, just follow your passion on the side.

  • Remember, Albert Einstein was a patent clerk.

  • That was his job, but his passion was physics.

  • And he wrote four of his most important papers

  • in his spare time as a hobby, and became one of the world's greatest scientists.

  • So it's amazing what you can do

  • if you love what you do.

  • (Applause)

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A2 TED-Ed passion love job successful people loved

【TED-Ed】The power of passion - Richard St. John

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    VoiceTube posted on 2013/06/12
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