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  • Hey, welcome back to 8IELTS.

  • This is great! Thank you. Back to you.

  • We’d like to say a big thank you for everybody that’s following our show.

  • Thanks people think we are so educational that people love our show so much.

  • As people who work on the show are so happy about that, so thank you guys so much!

  • I wonder what the topic is today.

  • I see pencil case, laptop.

  • Thank you.

  • But I wonder what topic it’s really about today.

  • We have so many people requesting for different topic.

  • Thank you.

  • And now, I finally get to know, the topic today’s on university.

  • I know the perfect pair who’s going to give us some inside into university on the IELTS exam.

  • And they are people that have been very successful in the university application.

  • And these are two people and of course, before we meet them, I gonna prepare a little bit of the script.

  • We gonna meet them right now, ok?

  • Hey, youre back with us in the studio and right here we have two people that are going to talk to you about university.

  • Theyre quite experienced because they spend the majority of their time in the university environment.

  • So let’s welcome Phuong Mac Tri and Viet Nguyen to the studio.

  • Thanks guys for coming.

  • Thank you for having us.

  • Why did you spend so much time in school?

  • That’s an interesting question.

  • I think the quickest answer maybe I enjoy school and I find myself doing well in my study.

  • But part of the reason why I have spent so much time in school is because each of the stage of my education is around a different area.

  • So it keeps me interested in term of the research that I do and the kind of knowledge that I gain for my study.

  • What about you, Viet?

  • I think, for me, I generally say it’s because I always bad at making friends and I like being in the library a little bit more.

  • But also because, like Tri, I love learning. And the thing that I want to study is a little bit more long and involved.

  • Like the process of becoming a doctors is very long!

  • So it kept me about life in the libraries in schools.

  • A lot of people want to ask, youre both from prestigious institutions, “How do you get into those institutions?”

  • I actually have never thought about going to one of these schools.

  • I went to a state school for undergraduate, so it really wasn’t part of my directory, for saying.

  • It wasn’t like a dream that I dared to dream.

  • But it turns out that, I think, it was like life, sort of, brought me there in many ways.

  • Partially, I think the process was that it seemed like a good school for my professional development at that time.

  • For me, I’m about to fight for residency again.

  • So I’m diving into the letter of recommendations, personal statement, in the transcriptions, somethings like that.

  • And it makes me realize that preparing for these applications is the long process.

  • It’s been my entire life, it’s not the three months before that application is due.

  • So I think it’s a process of learning for myself, what I care about,

  • what matters, building relationships that can help me in that process of developing skills necessary to progress academically or professionally.

  • So the story of my part is a little funny, because I grew up in Central Square, Cambridge, which is about fifteen-minute walk from Harvard University.

  • But growing up and going to high school, we always start of Harvard yard, which is area where a lot of classes and the students living in dormitories.

  • We thought of Harvard yard is just a yard that we walk through to get to Harvard square to hang out and have fun.

  • Because in high school, we just hang out in Harvard square a lot.

  • But the short story is that after junior year, we have to take the PSAT back in my days.

  • After getting your score, you get a certain range; the school will send you a catalog.

  • I receive a catalogue that summer and Harvard surely looked really nice.

  • So I started having a different image of what Harvard yard stood for.

  • That inspired me to study hard for the test to able to prepare myself for application.

  • But what an honest truth about why to pursuit these school is that in America, at least, these are schools that have the most resources.

  • Harvard has a very good financial aid.

  • So if youre students who work hard to get yourself to the stage of being able to have good test score or good resume,

  • youre providing a opportunity for yourself to have a chance to get education for free.

  • That’s one of the, I think, great incentives for young people to think about.

  • I think one of the main goal that a lot of Vietnamese students right now, when it comes to choosing a new university,

  • it isWhat can I do or what can I study so I can be financially stable, I can make the most money”.

  • I think, on the one hand, that is the real thing they have to think about to sustain their family.

  • But on the other hand, I think there should be also room for us all to think about

  • what we’d like to do, what we passion about, where we see ourselves as people in the long term, not with what career but with what we gonna be doing.

  • I think it’s more important.

  • And I think you guys reflected that idea very very well in your decision to pick whatever to study in university.

  • I just gonna say I think I’m actually coming back here this time, I have a lot of hope that people can pursuit different interests, find a way to make it financially sustainable.

  • As were becoming much more like global world,

  • there’s a lot more investment for different ideas and different thoughts

  • that may not be so conventional and entrepreneurship seem to be like very quickly growing thing in Vietnam.

  • I think I’ll build on your last point and also try to connect that to reflection that in a rapidly developing economy, certain skill set or experiences that are valuable

  • and those people want to those skill set in order to get a job or provide for your family, their future, to plan for career advancement.

  • There’s a lot of valuable experience from observing how life works on the street.

  • Part of the community work I was going to do at that time was learning how to listen to people,

  • because people will have different pressure, stress and challenges that face them in their community, in their individual life or with their job.

  • One of the way that one can gain, sort of dispose intellectual,

  • the high level and analytical skill and also soft skills such as emotional intelligence or the ability to interact, make people feel comfortable when you meet someone new.

  • And a lot of the soft skills are actually not maybe stressed in the education system here in the sense

  • that actually one of the most successful I think, thing I was prepare myself for is coming to League university, you gonna meet a lot of people not from the same background as you.

  • You gonna meet people with very totally different, maybe ways to communicate, maybe different social economic background.

  • You gonna be in touch with them, you have to communicate with them to your four years.

  • So one way to solve is to prepare oneself to be able to listen, to be able to be at time to get conflict.

  • And maybe, in Vietnam sometimes, conflict is not so good.

  • Anyone wants to agree and just like have fun, and just take it easy.

  • But actually, conflict is something that in American university, is a growing process.

  • So I think conflict actually makes the leadership too.

  • And the ability to handle conflict, listen and also to still maintain a friendship or a relationship in conflict is something

  • that means that they have some experiences too in the past year.

  • When I talk on top idea about leadership, I think one of the values of taking leadership position

  • or trying to engage with the problem actually develop empathy, like an ability to recognise how difficult it is to live.

  • Regardless whether or not, you ultimately come to leader cooperation, you might be able to negotiate the difficult in a professional relationship a little bit more.

  • There’s an idea by an author, an anthropologist, I think, her name’s Anne Fadiman.

  • She writes about standing at the shoreline.

  • She wrote a pretty well-known book calledThe Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down”.

  • She mentioned how her role as a writer standing at the cast between the family’s loses and the doctor.

  • It was like the shoreline between the ocean and the sand.

  • And how theyre at those point of turbulence, is where you can see the most dynamic changes in the most movement.

  • There is where you can see both the ocean and the land.

  • So for me it’s been inspiring to not shy away from things that are difficult or uncomfortable.

  • Because they can be growing movements.

  • Absolutely!

  • What I want to highlight is built up with what youve just mentioned,

  • maybe useful for students in Vietnam wanting to have aspiration for studying overseas and on comparing themselves culturally for that transition.

  • One thing that Viet and I share in common is the experience from emigrant background.

  • Our parents emigrated from Vietnam to the United States when I was very young, before Viet were born.

  • When we grew up, the dynamic of conflict and change and empathy is extremely important for our life experience, for survival in some ways.

  • We grow up in an immigrant family and with parents.

  • When that’s beginning, a completely new cultural system tries to make a living where we were learning the language, requires a new tongue in some ways.

  • How does that language, how do we communicate back to our parents who are in some way,

  • from a different culture, a Vietnamese culture, where we are somewhat hybrid Vietnamese Americans.

  • When we get older and become more fluent, it’s like institutional working of a new country, we either have a translate or support a family in navigating that.

  • But we also have new aspirations, being raised in that system.

  • That also leads question to a lot of adaptation, flexibility and mainly to the experience coming back to Vietnam afterwards and how that plays out.

  • I think you guys touch on a lot of things that’s I think very important.

  • If youre watching at home, if you consider university, you also face a big questionWho you are? How you are academically compared to other”.

  • What university choice?

  • How is that going to influence your future?

  • But if you listen to our conversation, I think a lot of things that we will be really really focusing on

  • is who we are, how do we protect ourselves and what do we wanna do, not necessary to a career but

  • where do we see ourselves affecting the community and affecting other people.

  • I think those are some of the key points that we should also look at when we consider university options.

  • Nowadays, there’s a lot of information out there.

  • You can look up how to apply for US universities online.

  • You can look up how to apply for UK universities online.

  • And if youre considering Vietnamese education, focus well on your score in order to get into that school.

  • But at the end of the day, university’s a platform for us all to grow.

  • What we do with our university education and what we do after university is also really important as well.

  • So I think university is just really a starting point of everything.

  • Would you like to showcase each other and also us something that’s not academic,

  • that are fun, that are some of your talents?

  • So I can do something.

  • It’s a silly song I think, maybe reflected of… I actually attended kindergarten in Vietnam,

  • but then moved to the United States at the age of seven.

  • This is the song I’d like to do.

  • It’s a little silly, but hopefully it’s fun.

  • I will perform too, but excuse me, it’s very silly.

  • Provide more support.

  • Thank you Vit.

  • Viet, not Vit.

  • (The song is One duck).

  • One duck, alright.

  • If I say something wrong in Vietnamese, excuse me, but it’s been a long time since kindergarten.

  • But I want to perform something, just for fun.

  • You know what I realize in that performance, you made one little mistake.

  • At the end, it’s “vay cai canh cho kho” (flapping to dry the wings), you weren’t shaking the wings, you were shaking something else.

  • Sorry, maybe I was thinkingDui” (thigh)

  • So maybe tell wings.

  • Maybe Viet could do it correctly.

  • No, she followed you.

  • Tri was calling the mother duck.

  • Maybe yes.

  • Ok, Viet what are you gonna do for us?

  • Part of my year hood, I didn’t grow up in Vietnam.

  • I never heard any Vietnamese folk songs or childhood songs.

  • Throughout this year and though my travel and interview, I actually got the chance to learn a lot of these classic Vietnamese childhood songs.

  • And I was touched, because there’s so much more emotional and so much more authentic, in some ways, likeThe wheel on the bus”.

  • I’m just gonna sing a little bit.

  • Then I share a bit about my mom, so I think therere ....to it too.

  • How did you learn about this song?

  • And how’s that related to you and your mother?

  • I have the privilege of going on the trip throughout Vietnam and I was connected with a lot of different elements of promoting education as well as providing musical inspiration and part of public health.

  • I was very fortunate to be able to share about a lot of different topics that are important to me, whether it’s like hygiene or importantly sexually productive health to young girls.

  • And Q&A consultation about general health issues like high blood pressure, joint-pain problems.

  • Through that process, I was introduced to a bunch of Vietnamese folk songs.

  • Among them, there was thisEm di dua com” (I deliver lunch to my mom).

  • The obvious things that it was tinned with idyllic childhood in the world landscape that I have never experience when I think I, sort of, always yearn for.

  • A lot of the symmetries in that songs speaks to my experience about what my mother was too.

  • Like someone who’s always hardworking, who’s always make sure that people at first to always stay up late.

  • Absolutely.

  • Next up is the IELTS MARATHON.

  • So let’s go.

  • Hey, youre back on 8IELTS and this is the 8IELTS MARATHON CHALLENGE.

  • We have two contenders today, not just one and they are Tri and Viet.

  • Welcome them.

  • You guysve been so educated, youve been in school for so long, I assume this probably gonna be an easy challenge.

  • Well see how it goes, looking forward to it.

  • First up, we have a blindfold for you.

  • And Tri, you gonna blindfold yourself.

  • Ok.

  • Right now, both of you will have to close your eyes.

  • One, two, three close your eyes.

  • Both of you can open your eyes, but I know only one person can see.

  • Viet, you can direct Tri now to find the information letter, a passport as well as a set of key.

  • Alright my friend, I think that you should squat down, and put your hand straight down.

  • Ok.

  • Go to your side, go to the right.

  • Yeah.

  • Pick it up and see if it has anything.

  • Confirmation letter.

  • Reach out in front of you, with your right hand.

  • Yeah, I know, something.

  • Good.

  • There might be a problem. The confirmation letter need to be detached.

  • Ok, so I take this off.

  • Yeah, good, ok.

  • So we have one more thing.

  • Ok.

  • I think it’s a passport, so it’s possibly in a little container thing.

  • Maybe you can move to your left.

  • Your feet have a bunch of things underneath them.

  • So if I were you, I would stand up.

  • Ok.

  • Take step back.

  • It looks like a wallet, but there’s a zipper.

  • Good teamwork!

  • Is it?

  • You got all three things.

  • Now you got to direct him to come to me.

  • Alright.

  • Rotate.

  • Turn another 90 degree to your right.

  • Ok.

  • Good. Stop.

  • Turn to your left.

  • How many degrees?

  • Walk straight.

  • Take slow steps, because you will come to a platform.

  • Hi that.

  • Now hand it to her, she’s to your right.

  • Ok. Hi Phoebe.

  • Here’s the key, and passport and my invitation letter.

  • Now I need your mask also.

  • Ok, thank you, let me see.

  • You guys pass the challenge.

  • Youre off to the next challenge.

  • Ok.