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  • Hi again. Adam here. www.engvid.com. I have another lesson for you today. This is actually

  • a request by Feresque -- Feresser? I hope I'm saying it right. Sorry about that. It

  • was in the comments section of www.engvid.com. Please leave questions and comments and requests

  • and we'll do our best to get them for you. So the request was: the difference between "all" and "whole".

  • Now, the reason I also chose this lesson is because this is a very

  • common mistake that students make. They mix these two up all the time. They have very

  • specific roles in situations. We're going to look at them today.

  • The first and most important thing to remember about "all" versus "whole" is where to put

  • the definite article "the". So it's always "all the" whatever you're talking about,

  • "the whole" whatever you're talking about, so always "the" after "all", "the" before "whole". Now,

  • they sound a little bit similar, "all", "whole", but not. Right? So be careful about pronunciation.

  • Sometimes people might think you're mixing them up just because of pronunciation:

  • "all", "whole". Make sure you get that "H" sound and that "O" sound together.

  • Now, what's the difference between "all" and "whole"? "All", you're talking about "everything".

  • Whatever it is you're talking about, you're talking about all of it, basically: everything,

  • one, etc. When you're talking about "whole", you're talking about a "complete" something:

  • a complete package, a complete group, a complete container of something, right? Whatever it

  • is you're talking about, it has to be complete, right? It has pieces inside, and then the

  • whole is the complete collection of whatever it is you're talking about, whereas "all"

  • is just everything that's involved with that noun, etc. So I'm going to give you a very

  • quick example: You're sitting -- your friend went on a trip out of town. He had to take

  • the bus for two hours to his friend's house in Montreal, let's say. He comes back. You

  • ask him "How was the trip?", and he goes, "Oh, my God, there was a baby on the bus,

  • and the baby cried all the time." But if he said, "The baby cried the whole time", do

  • you think that it's a different meaning? Usually people will understand the same thing, but

  • technically, "all the time" doesn't mean two hours crying. It means "cried, stopped, cried,

  • stopped, cried, stopped." It seemed like he was crying throughout the trip, okay? But

  • if somebody said, "The baby cried the whole time", I understand "two hours, baby crying,

  • wah, wah, wah, two hours." It could drive a person crazy. "All the time" -- he cried

  • enough times that it seemed like a long time. "The whole time" means for two hours straight,

  • non-stop. Okay. So that's a big difference between "all" and "whole", okay? "The whole

  • time", I'm talking about the specific duration, the complete journey, two hours. "All the

  • time" - always: always crying, stopping. Always crying, stopping, crying, stopping, crying,

  • stopping. Not very much fun. But, "I studied all day" -- I have a test tomorrow; I studied

  • all day. "I studied the whole day." In this case, I would understand the exact same thing

  • as well. You can switch these two. But "all day" means, "I studied. I took a break. I

  • studied. I didn't do anything else -- only studied today." But "I studied the whole day"

  • means "I sat at my desk, and I studied; I didn't stop." So that's one of the big differences

  • between "all" and "whole". "Whole" we're talking about time, non-stop, continuous. "All" means

  • in that day, many times, and that's basically -- you did -- that's the one activity that

  • you did, okay? So this is one aspect of "all" and "whole". "The" and duration, like, "always"

  • and the "complete" time of whatever it is you're talking about. We're going to look

  • at a couple of other differences that are very important that you need to keep in mind.

  • Okay, so now we're going to look at a few other differences that are sometimes very

  • small but important. So let's look at the two examples here first: "All my friends came."

  • "My whole group of friends came." What do you notice first about the differences between

  • these two? One, the possessive adjective -- my, his, your, etc. -- with "all" comes after

  • "all" -- comes before "whole": "My whole group of friends came." So I can say "all my friends",

  • all individual friends, right? But remember what I said about "whole". "Whole" means something

  • complete, a complete package of something. So I have "group of friends" came. The meaning

  • is more or less the same, okay? But here I talk about the group; here I talk about the

  • individuals. Very important to remember. But most important -- possessive, after "all",

  • before "whole", okay? That's one. Let's look at another thing. Sometimes you

  • can interchange the two words. The sentence looks exactly the same, but the meaning is

  • very different, okay? "All cities were destroyed." So let's say for example there was an earthquake

  • or a volcano eruption in Hawaii, okay? In Hawaii there's -- there are many cities. Volcano

  • erupted; lava flowed; earth shook; etc. "All cities were destroyed." But if I say, "Whole

  • cities were destroyed", the meaning is very different. Here, "All cities were destroyed"

  • means no more cities. Every city -- destroyed. But if I say "whole cities", it means some

  • cities were completely destroyed, okay? I put marker on myself, sorry. "Whole cities

  • destroyed" means "one city, completely destroyed, but there are other cities that are okay."

  • This one -- no more cities; all flat, all covered in lava. Okay, so that's one other

  • thing. With "all", when you're talking about non-countable nouns

  • -- money, water, air, sugar, milk, non-countable nouns -- you're usually going to use "all".

  • You're not going to say "whole the money" because it doesn't make any sense because

  • it's not a complete thing. It's a singular, non-countable. "All the money was stolen.

  • All the water was drunk", or spilled or whatever the thing is. And you're not going -- and

  • you're usually going to use "whole" with a singular, countable noun. You prefer to use

  • "whole" than "all" but it depends on the situation. Now, some people are going to ask me in the

  • comments section -- but now they won't because I'll give you the answer right now -- why

  • don't I say "all of my friends"? Why don't I say it? Because I don't need to, okay? This

  • is an extra word. You don't need to use it. The only time you need to use "all of" is

  • with an object pronoun -- all of them, all of it, all of us, all of whom -- with a clause,

  • etc. Otherwise, you just don't need "of". It's a useless word. It doesn't help. It doesn't

  • do anything. If I say "the whole of", it's also the exact same. I don't need to use it.

  • It means "the complete package". So that's another difference.

  • The last one, and this is very, very important especially for those of you who are going

  • to be taking tests and grammar is important: "All students need to come to class early

  • tomorrow." "The whole class needs to come early tomorrow." Can you see the difference?

  • Main thing to remember: with "all" and plural, you have the matching verb, students "need".

  • Remember with "whole" you have a complete package, one package. The whole class "needs

  • to", singular with the "S", plural without the "S", okay?

  • So now you see all the differences between "all" and "whole", and I know that students

  • are going to tell me, "I studied the whole time" or "I study all -- whole the time",

  • that's what I hear often, "I study whole the time, but I don't improve." Now you will improve.

  • I hope, anyway. Go to www.engvid.com. Take the quiz. Practice a little bit more. If you

  • have any questions or comments, write them in the comments. Also check out my video on

  • www.youtube.com. Subscribe to my channel. It would be very nice of you, and I will see

  • you again very soon. Thanks.

Hi again. Adam here. www.engvid.com. I have another lesson for you today. This is actually

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A2 complete studied destroyed cried talking countable

Learn English - ALL or WHOLE?

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    VoiceTube posted on 2013/06/05
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